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In ASP.NET there is a System.Web.HttpRequest class, which contains ServerVariables property which can provide us the IP address from REMOTE_ADDR property value.

However, I could not find a similar way to get the IP address of the remote host from ASP.NET Web API.

How can I get the IP address of the remote host that is making the request?

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4 Answers

up vote 80 down vote accepted

It's possible to do that, but not very discoverable - you need to use the property bag from the incoming request, and the property you need to access depends on whether you're using the Web API under IIS (webhosted) or self-hosted. The code below shows how this can be done.

private string GetClientIp(HttpRequestMessage request)
{
    if (request.Properties.ContainsKey("MS_HttpContext"))
    {
        return ((HttpContextWrapper)request.Properties["MS_HttpContext"]).Request.UserHostAddress;
    }
    else if (request.Properties.ContainsKey(RemoteEndpointMessageProperty.Name))
    {
        RemoteEndpointMessageProperty prop;
        prop = (RemoteEndpointMessageProperty)request.Properties[RemoteEndpointMessageProperty.Name];
        return prop.Address;
    }
    else
    {
        return null;
    }
}
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Thank you! Just a small fix - HttpContextWrapper must be used instead of HttpContext. –  paulius_l Mar 6 '12 at 10:23
    
Thanks, fixed it. –  carlosfigueira Mar 6 '12 at 14:51
2  
Thanks, I was looking for this too. Minor improvement = extension class: gist.github.com/2653453 –  MikeJansen May 10 '12 at 14:35
5  
The WebAPI is for the most part very clean. It's a shame that code like this is needed for something trivial as an IP. –  Toad Aug 17 '12 at 13:38
2  
@Slauma, yes, they are. ASP.NET Web API is (currently) implemented in two "flavors", self-hosted and web-hosted. The web-hosted version is implemented on top of ASP.NET, while the self-hosted one on top of a WCF listener. Notice that the platform (ASP.NET Web API) itself is hosting-agnostic, so it's possible that someone will implement a different hosting in the future and the host will surface that property (remote endpoint) differently. –  carlosfigueira Aug 23 '12 at 18:24
show 6 more comments

If you really want a one-liner and don't plan to self-host Web API:

((System.Web.HttpContextWrapper)Request.Properties["MS_HttpContext"]).Request.UserHostAddress;
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This solution also covers Web API self-hosted using Owin. Partially from here.

You can create a private method in you ApiController that will return remote IP address no matter how you host your Web API:

 private const string HttpContext = "MS_HttpContext";
 private const string RemoteEndpointMessage =
     "System.ServiceModel.Channels.RemoteEndpointMessageProperty";
 private const string OwinContext = "MS_OwinContext";

 private string GetClientIp(HttpRequestMessage request)
 {
       // Web-hosting
       if (request.Properties.ContainsKey(HttpContext ))
       {
            HttpContextWrapper ctx = 
                (HttpContextWrapper)request.Properties[HttpContext];
            if (ctx != null)
            {
                return ctx.Request.UserHostAddress;
            }
       }

       // Self-hosting
       if (request.Properties.ContainsKey(RemoteEndpointMessage))
       {
            RemoteEndpointMessageProperty remoteEndpoint =
                (RemoteEndpointMessageProperty)request.Properties[RemoteEndpointMessage];
            if (remoteEndpoint != null)
            {
                return remoteEndpoint.Address;
            }
        }

       // Self-hosting using Owin
       if (request.Properties.ContainsKey(OwinContext))
       {
           OwinContext owinContext = (OwinContext)request.Properties[OwinContext];
           if (owinContext != null)
           {
               return owinContext.Request.RemoteIpAddress;
           }
       }

        return null;
 }

References required:

  • HttpContextWrapper - System.Web.dll
  • RemoteEndpointMessageProperty - System.ServiceModel.dll
  • OwinContext - Microsoft.Owin.dll (you will have it already if you use Owin package)

A little problem with this solution is that you have to load libraries for all 3 cases when you will actually be using only one of them during runtime. As suggested here, this can be overcome by using dynamic variables. You can also write GetClientIpAddress method as an extension for HttpRequestMethod.

public static class HttpRequestMessageExtensions
{
    private const string HttpContext = "MS_HttpContext";
    private const string RemoteEndpointMessage =
        "System.ServiceModel.Channels.RemoteEndpointMessageProperty";
    private const string OwinContext = "MS_OwinContext";

    public static string GetClientIpAddress(this HttpRequestMessage request)
    {
       // Web-hosting. Needs reference to System.Web.dll
       if (request.Properties.ContainsKey(HttpContext))
       {
           dynamic ctx = request.Properties[HttpContext];
           if (ctx != null)
           {
               return ctx.Request.UserHostAddress;
           }
       }

       // Self-hosting. Needs reference to System.ServiceModel.dll. 
       if (request.Properties.ContainsKey(RemoteEndpointMessage))
       {
            dynamic remoteEndpoint = request.Properties[RemoteEndpointMessage];
            if (remoteEndpoint != null)
            {
                return remoteEndpoint.Address;
            }
        }

       // Self-hosting using Owin. Needs reference to Microsoft.Owin.dll. 
       if (request.Properties.ContainsKey(OwinContext))
       {
           dynamic owinContext = request.Properties[OwinContext];
           if (owinContext != null)
           {
               return owinContext.Request.RemoteIpAddress;
           }
       }

        return null;
    }
}

Now you can use it like this:

public class TestController : ApiController
{
    [HttpPost]
    [ActionName("TestRemoteIp")]
    public string TestRemoteIp()
    {
        return Request.GetClientIpAddress();
    }
}
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The solution provided by carlosfigueira works, but type-safe one-liners are better: Add a using System.Web then access HttpContext.Current.Request.UserHostAddress in your action method.

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17  
-1 this can't be trusted in web api because HttpContext.Current is not persisted correctly throughout the task pipeline; since all request handling is asynchronous. HttpContext.Current should almost always be avoided when writing Web API code. –  Andras Zoltan Jul 4 '12 at 23:32
    
@Andras, I would like to know more detail why using HttpContext.Current is bad, do you know any valuable resource for this? –  Cuong Le Jul 31 '12 at 17:30
10  
Hi @CuongLe; in fact - whilst the threading issue can be a problem (although not always directly if the SynchronizationContext is flowed correctly between tasks); the biggest issue with this is if your service code is ever likely to be self-hosted (testing, for example) - HttpContext.Current is a purely Asp.Net construct and doesn't exist when you self-host. –  Andras Zoltan Jul 31 '12 at 22:29
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