Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to convert the os.cpus() info to percentage? Just like the output of iostat (on the CPU section).

My code:

var os = require('os');
console.log(os.cpus());

The output:

[ { model: 'MacBookAir4,2',
    speed: 1800,
    times: 
     { user: 5264280,
       nice: 0,
       sys: 4001110,
       idle: 58703910,
       irq: 0 } },
  { model: 'MacBookAir4,2',
    speed: 1800,
    times: 
     { user: 2215030,
       nice: 0,
       sys: 1072600,
       idle: 64657440,
       irq: 0 } },
  { model: 'MacBookAir4,2',
    speed: 1800,
    times: 
     { user: 5973360,
       nice: 0,
       sys: 3197990,
       idle: 58773760,
       irq: 0 } },
  { model: 'MacBookAir4,2',
    speed: 1800,
    times: 
     { user: 2187650,
       nice: 0,
       sys: 1042550,
       idle: 64714820,
       irq: 0 } } ]

I would like to have the "times" metric converted to percentage, just like is show on the iostat command:

  cpu
us sy id
6  3 91

I understand that the values in the nodejs function are in CPU ticks, but I have no idea what formula should I use to convert them to percentage :)

Thanks.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

According to the docs, times is

an object containing the number of CPU ticks spent in: user, nice, sys, idle, and irq

So you should just be able to sum the times and calculate the percentage, like below:

var os = require("os"),
    cpus = os.cpus();

for(var i = 0, len = cpus.length; i < len; i++) {
    console.log("CPU %s:", i);
    var cpu = cpus[i], total = 0;
    for(type in cpu.times)
        total += cpu.times[type];

    for(type in cpu.times)
        console.log("\t", type, Math.round(100 * cpu.times[type] / total));
}

EDIT: As Tom Frost says in the comments, this is the average usage since system boot. This is consistent with the question, since the same is true of iostat. However, iostat has the option of doing regular updates, showing the average usage since the last update. Tom's method would work well for implementing that.

share|improve this answer
    
That's it! That was the formula I was looking for. Thanks :) –  rogeriopvl Mar 5 '12 at 14:20
    
Can't believe I missed the os.* API when looking :-/ There you go that should be all you need. –  w00t Apr 26 '12 at 13:08
7  
It's worth noting that this only gives you the usage averaged over time since the machine was last booted. If you run idle for a week and spike to 100% CPU usage, this script will still show the machine as nearly idle. A better approach might be to use setTimeout to measure the stats before and after a second or two wait, subtract the start ticks from the end ticks, and do the calculations on that. –  Tom Frost Jul 10 '12 at 19:29

This module, that caN be installed using NPM provides what you need:

https://github.com/oscmejia/os-utils

calle the cpuUsage(callback) method and you will get what you need.

share|improve this answer

If you are looking at the CPU Usage per process try node-usage

share|improve this answer

a simple hack:

var os = require('os')
var samples = []
var prevCpus = os.cpus()

setInterval(sample,100)
setInterval(print,1000)

function print() {
  var result = {last10:null, last50:null, last100:null}
  var percent = 0
  var i = samples.length
  var j = 0
  while (i--) {
    j++
    if (samples[i].total > 0)
      percent += (100 - Math.round(100 * samples[i].idle / samples[i].total))
    if (j == 10)       result.last10  = percent/j   
    else if (j == 50)  result.last50  = percent/j    
    else if (j == 100) result.last100 = percent/j
  }
  console.log(result)
}

function sample() {
  currCpus = os.cpus()
  for (var i=0,len=currCpus.length;i<len;i++) {
    var prevCpu = prevCpus[i]
    var currCpu = currCpus[i]
    var deltas = {total:0}
    for (var t in prevCpu.times) 
      deltas.total += currCpu.times[t] - prevCpu.times[t]
    for (var t in prevCpu.times) 
      deltas[t] = currCpu.times[t] - prevCpu.times[t]
  }
  prevCpus = currCpus
  samples.push(deltas)
  if (samples.length>100) samples.shift()
}

you could use a metrics-lib like https://github.com/felixge/node-measured to plumb something more prolific

share|improve this answer

i'm using this code:

var cpu_used = function(){
var cpu = os.cpus();

var counter = 0;
var total=0;

var free=0;
var sys=0;
var user=0;

for (var i = 0; i<cpu.length ; i++) {

    counter++;
    total=parseFloat(cpu[i].times.idle)+parseFloat(cpu[i].times.sys)+parseFloat(cpu[i].times.user)+parseFloat(cpu[i].times.irq)+parseFloat(cpu[i].times.nice);

    free+=100*(parseFloat(cpu[i].times.idle)/total);
    sys+=100*(parseFloat(cpu[i].times.sys)/total);
    user+=100*(parseFloat(cpu[i].times.user)/total);
};

console.log('CPU %s : %s + %s + %s',i,(free/counter),(user/counter),(sys/counter));

}
share|improve this answer

This is my Solution

Interval is in Seconds.

10 will calculate load over the last 10 seconds!

var _  = require("underscore");
var os = require("os"); 
var interval = 1;
var old = _.map(os.cpus(),function(cpu){ return cpu.times;})

setInterval(function() {
    var result = [];
    var current = _.map(os.cpus(),function(cpu){ return cpu.times; })
    _.each(current, function(item,cpuKey){
        result[cpuKey]={}

        var oldVal = old[cpuKey];
        _.each(_.keys(item),function(timeKey){
            var diff = (  parseFloat((item[timeKey]) - parseFloat(oldVal[timeKey])) / parseFloat((interval*100)));
            var name = timeKey;
            if(timeKey == "idle"){
                name = "CPU"        
                diff = 100 - diff;
            }
            //console.log(timeKey + ":\t" + oldVal[timeKey] + "\t\t" + item[timeKey] + "\t\t" + diff);  
            result[cpuKey][name]=diff.toFixed(0);
        });
    });
    console.log(result);
    old=current;
}, (interval * 1000));

Outputs something like this on my 8-core every n-seconds

[ { user: '82', nice: '0', sys: '18', CPU: '100', irq: '0' },
  { user: '1', nice: '0', sys: '1', CPU: '3', irq: '0' },
  { user: '1', nice: '0', sys: '1', CPU: '3', irq: '0' },
  { user: '9', nice: '0', sys: '2', CPU: '11', irq: '0' },
  { user: '1', nice: '0', sys: '0', CPU: '1', irq: '0' },
  { user: '1', nice: '0', sys: '1', CPU: '2', irq: '0' },
  { user: '1', nice: '0', sys: '2', CPU: '2', irq: '0' },
  { user: '1', nice: '0', sys: '2', CPU: '3', irq: '0' } ]

Pushing this via socket.io into my Flow-Charts ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Note: I changed "idle" to "CPU" and substracted it from 100. So you have 80% cpu usage. Which i prefer to 20% idle –  user3575777 Jun 4 at 17:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.