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I'd like to use a "compiled regex" (I mean: an expression in the form qr/../) as a key for an hash structure.

To discern between constant strings and these regexes when iterating over the hash keyes, I was trying to use ref(), or is_regexp(), but the former returns a null string, and the latter doesn't work. I'm afraid I'm missing something fundamental about Perl refs vs. scalars.

Apart from that, my solution seems to work. Is it too ugly anyway? Any alternate proposal is welcome.

Some code to understand ref() function:

my $regex = qr/foo/;
printf "ref(\$regex): %s \n", ref($regex);
printf "is_regexp(\$regex): %d \n", is_regexp($regex);
# ref($regex): Regexp
# is_regexp($regex): 1

my $scalar = 3;
printf "ref(\$scalar): [%s] \n", ref($scalar);
# ref($scalar): []

my %my_hash = ('name', 'Becky', 'age', 23);
for my $k (keys %my_hash) {
    printf "%s [%s] -> %s [%s] \n", $k, ref($k), $my_hash{$k}, ref($my_hash{$k});
}
# name [] -> Becky []
# age [] -> 23 []
share|improve this question
5  
Keys in a hash are strings. ref will always return undef for those. If you use anything as a key that is not a string, it gets converted to string. –  Qtax Mar 5 '12 at 12:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

As Qtax notes in the comments, Perl hash keys are always strings: if you use something other than a string as a hash key, it's first converted to a string.

In another comment you write:

"I read counter definitions from a config file; I want to be able to support some pattern syntax, for example: McDouglas, McDonald, /Mc[A-Za-z]*/. I then read counter values from text files, and I update relevant counterS accordingly: McDonald 23 McIntosh 11"

If I understand this right, one simple solution might be to to store the compiled regexps in another hash, keyed on their string representation:

my @patterns = (
    'McDouglas',
    'McDonald',
    'Mc[A-Za-z]*',
);

my %regexps = map +($_ => qr/^$_$/), @patterns;
my %counters;

while (<>) {
    while (my ($pat, $re) = each %regexps) {
        $counters{$pat}++  if /$re/;
    }
}

foreach my $pat (@patterns) {
    print "$pat: ", ($counters{$pat} || 0), "\n";
}
share|improve this answer

Is there anything wrong with using Tie::RegexpHash? It saves you from having to reinvent the wheel :)

use Tie::RegexpHash;

my %hash;

tie %hash, 'Tie::RegexpHash';

$hash{ qr/^5(\s+|-)?gal(\.|lons?)?/i } = '5-GAL';

$hash{'5 gal'};     # returns "5-GAL"
$hash{'5GAL'};      # returns "5-GAL"
$hash{'5  gallon'}; # also returns "5-GAL"
share|improve this answer
    
While the package you suggest is quite interesting, it performs something different from what I need. In my case, I might as well store the plain strings defining the regexes (but I would lose the regex pre-compilation). One case where the trwo approaches clash is when one needs to store regexes partially overlapping each other. –  AndreaG Mar 5 '12 at 12:44
    
@AndreaG : Please provide an example of what you mean. –  Zaid Mar 5 '12 at 13:01
    
I read counter definitions from a config file; I want to be able to support some pattern syntax, for example: McDouglas, McDonald, /Mc[A-Za-z]*/. I then read counter values from text files, and I update relevant counterS accordingly: McDonald 23 McIntosh 11 –  AndreaG Mar 5 '12 at 13:19

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