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I'm working on a responsive design where the logo needs to be positioned top/center of the page and overlaying the content beneath it.... http://reversl.net/demo/ I can get this desired layout by giving the logo an absolute position

position: absolute;
top: 0;
left: 50%;
margin-left: -98px; /*--half the width of the logo--*/

For best standards....is there any reason why I shouldn't take this approach? From looking around folks tend not to favor using absolute positioning. Would it be better to give the logo a negative top margin and auto left/right margin? The main thing is that the logo remains top center when the media query breakpoints kick in..

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

Whether absolute positioning is appropriate depends on whether the positioned element should affect positions of other elements (or to be affected by them). If not, absolute positioning is perfectly OK.

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Absolute positioning is absolutely acceptable.

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Absolute Positioning is cool. forever people were using a 960px width layout and absolutely positioning everything in a relative wrapper... this worked well back then. But that was before we started designing responsively. When people say "AHHH NO absolute positioning," this is what they are talking about. But absolute positioning is great for all sorts of rad stuff... like what you are doing. that is the way to go about it... I am also a really big fan of fixed positioning... and it seems so be all working on ioS devices now !!! YAY !!!

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