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I'm trying to speed up the boot of my app, and one of the ideas i had for that was to use asynchronous dispatch queues. I have 2 tasks that can be run next to each other at startup (quite big tasks actually). However, both of them have a significant part that runs on the main thread (UI code mainly).

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue, ^{
    [self doTask1];
});

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue, ^{
    [self doTask2];
    //Will task 2 take turns with task 1, or will task 2 start after 1 is finished?
});

My question is this: If i call 2 dispatch_async's at boot like in this example, will they take turns in executing, or will the complete first block execute first, then the 2nd block?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

the main queue is a serial queue. blocks added to serial queues are executed in the order they are added and only one at a time (serially). in your example, task2 will not start until task1 has finished.

if you want them to run concurrently you'll need to dispatch them to one of the global concurrent queues.

dispatch_queue_t q = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0);
dispatch_async(q, ^{/* this work may finish before other work added to this queue later */});
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If it's a serial queue, then why can i call asynchronous dispatches to it? –  Erik Dolor Mar 5 '12 at 15:44
1  
I don't understand your question, why wouldn't you be able to? async just means you want to enqueue a block but don't necessarily need the result right now or want it to block the current operation you enqueued it from. it doesn't require that it happen on a different thread or start immediately. –  Ashley Clark Mar 5 '12 at 15:51
3  
There seems to be a common misconception that "asynchronous" and "concurrent" are synonyms. I'm not sure where it came from, but I see it all over stack overflow. –  Catfish_Man Mar 5 '12 at 16:56
    
That is indeed the idea i had, but now that you mention it i see the difference. Thanks for the good point! –  Erik Dolor Mar 5 '12 at 18:38

One will be executed after the other, but they will execute concurrently, meaning you can execute task2 before task1 has finished.

Check the alternative:

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue, ^{
    [self doTask1];
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue, ^{
        [self doTask2];
        //Now task2 will execute after task1
    });
});
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So the alternative assures they will execute in that order, and my example may let task2 finish before task1? Note: I'm looking for that last behaviour. –  Erik Dolor Mar 5 '12 at 12:51
    
Yes, my alternative will assure one task starts after the other. –  fbernardo Mar 5 '12 at 13:31
3  
the main queue does not execute tasks concurrently –  Ashley Clark Mar 5 '12 at 14:06
    
@AshleyClark true, so they will execute one after the other in the main thread? –  fbernardo Mar 5 '12 at 14:10
3  
not necessarily immediately after the other since the main queue also processes user events, but the second enqueued task definitely won't start until the first one finishes. –  Ashley Clark Mar 5 '12 at 15:32

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