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I am buying a new PC and wuld be getting a 64-bit Windows 7 OS in it (with 16gigs of RAM). I was wondering if it will be OK to develop WPF, Silverlight and Windows Phone custom applications/controls in the 64-bit environment.

I know i can set the AnyCpu setting to get the project built, but would it work well if someone were to use my say WPF or Silverlight control in their WPF application that was being built in 32bit windows environment or run in that environment?

Any caveats, issues or limitations? Would it work well at all or should i have to get the machine with 32-bit windows just to develop, and forgo the 13GB odd RAM :( because 32 bits cannot access it?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Go for the 64 Bit for christs sake. There are only a hand fulll of Windows developers who still run on 32bit! I have been developing in .Net for 4 years on a 64Bit machine! One drawback is that the edit and continue Feature doesnt work on 64Bit. But I couldnt live with 3GB RAM anymore...

If needed you can still work on a virtual 32bit pc inside your 64Bit...

See http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtual-pc/

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Thanks. If i had some WinForms projects as well (that uses unmanaged code) would i still be able to simply set the AnyCpu flag and build the project and be able to let others use the dll in their 32bit systems or would i have to build a separate 32bit dll for that purpose if my main machine was 64bits OS? –  CoolApp Mar 8 '12 at 8:50
    
You would have choose your target environment when you build. 32bit will work on 64bit but not vice versa. see stackoverflow.com/questions/5229768/… –  Elementenfresser Mar 8 '12 at 9:24

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