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I have a set of binary records packed into a file and I am reading them using Data.ByteString.Lazy and Data.Binary.Get. With my current implementation an 8Mb file takes 6 seconds to parse.

import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy as BL
import Data.Binary.Get

data Trade = Trade { timestamp :: Int, price :: Int ,  qty :: Int } deriving (Show)

getTrades = do
  empty <- isEmpty
  if empty
    then return []
    else do
      timestamp <- getWord32le          
      price <- getWord32le
      qty <- getWord16le          
      rest <- getTrades
      let trade = Trade (fromIntegral timestamp) (fromIntegral price) (fromIntegral qty)
      return (trade : rest)

main :: IO()
main = do
  input <- BL.readFile "trades.bin" 
  let trades = runGet getTrades input
  print $ length trades

What can I do to make this faster?

share|improve this question
    
there is a chapter in real world haskell about profiling, and a few questions tagged [haskell] + [performance] on so.com - maybe this is of help for you. – epsilonhalbe Mar 5 '12 at 13:16
    
@epsilonhalbe Thanks, I did have a good search and this pattern is the one in the docs for Data.Binary.Get. I suspect it's an 'almost trail recursion' problem but it's a little bit beyond me to figure it out. – Dave Anderson Mar 5 '12 at 13:32
    
This is tricky as Data.Binary.Get appears strict - I made a previous comment about trying to get better lazyness, but I've deleted it as it was not applicable. Daniel Fischer's answer show you how to do a better job of being strict. – stephen tetley Mar 5 '12 at 15:30
up vote 17 down vote accepted

Your code decodes an 8MB file in less than one second here (ghc-7.4.1) - of course I compiled with -O2.

However, it needed an inordinate amount of stack space. You can reduce

  • the time
  • the stack space
  • the heap space

needed by adding more strictness in the appropriate places, and using an accumulator to collect the parsed-so-far trades.

{-# LANGUAGE BangPatterns #-}
module Main (main) where

import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy as BL
import Data.Binary.Get

data Trade = Trade { timestamp :: {-# UNPACK #-} !Int
                   , price :: {-# UNPACK #-} !Int 
                   , qty :: {-# UNPACK #-} !Int
                   } deriving (Show)

getTrades :: Get [Trade]
getTrades = go []
  where
    go !acc = do
      empty <- isEmpty
      if empty
        then return $! reverse acc
        else do
          !timestamp <- getWord32le
          !price <- getWord32le
          !qty <- getWord16le
          let !trade = Trade (fromIntegral timestamp) (fromIntegral price) (fromIntegral qty)
          go (trade : acc)

main :: IO()
main = do
  input <- BL.readFile "trades.bin"
  let trades = runGet getTrades input
  print $ length trades

The strictness and unpacking makes sure that no work is left undone to come back to bite you later by referencing a part of the ByteString that should already have been forgotten.

If you need Trade to have lazy fields, you can still decode through a type with strict fields and map the conversion over the result list to benefit from the stricter decoding.

However, the code still spends a lot of time garbage-collecting, so further improvements may still be necessary.

share|improve this answer
3  
Thank you very much for a great answer! You've helped a noob level up a little. – Dave Anderson Mar 5 '12 at 15:21

Refactoring it slightly (basically a left-fold) gives much better performance and lowers GC overhead quite a bit parsing a 8388600 byte file.

{-# LANGUAGE BangPatterns #-}
module Main (main) where

import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy as BL
import Data.Binary.Get

data Trade = Trade
  { timestamp :: {-# UNPACK #-} !Int
  , price     :: {-# UNPACK #-} !Int 
  , qty       :: {-# UNPACK #-} !Int
  } deriving (Show)

getTrade :: Get Trade
getTrade = do
  timestamp <- getWord32le
  price     <- getWord32le
  qty       <- getWord16le
  return $! Trade (fromIntegral timestamp) (fromIntegral price) (fromIntegral qty)

countTrades :: BL.ByteString -> Int
countTrades input = stepper (0, input) where
  stepper (!count, !buffer)
    | BL.null buffer = count
    | otherwise      =
        let (trade, rest, _) = runGetState getTrade buffer 0
        in stepper (count+1, rest)

main :: IO()
main = do
  input <- BL.readFile "trades.bin"
  let trades = countTrades input
  print trades

And the related runtime stats. Even though the allocation numbers are close, the GC and max heap size are quite a bit different between revisions.

All examples here were built with GHC 7.4.1 -O2.

The original source, run with +RTS -K1G -RTS due to excessive stack space usage:

     426,003,680 bytes allocated in the heap
     443,141,672 bytes copied during GC
      99,305,920 bytes maximum residency (9 sample(s))
             203 MB total memory in use (0 MB lost due to fragmentation)

  Total   time    0.62s  (  0.81s elapsed)

  %GC     time      83.3%  (86.4% elapsed)

Daniel's revision:

     357,851,536 bytes allocated in the heap
     220,009,088 bytes copied during GC
      40,846,168 bytes maximum residency (8 sample(s))
              85 MB total memory in use (0 MB lost due to fragmentation)

  Total   time    0.24s  (  0.28s elapsed)

  %GC     time      69.1%  (71.4% elapsed)

And this post:

     290,725,952 bytes allocated in the heap
         109,592 bytes copied during GC
          78,704 bytes maximum residency (10 sample(s))
               2 MB total memory in use (0 MB lost due to fragmentation)

  Total   time    0.06s  (  0.07s elapsed)

  %GC     time       5.0%  (6.0% elapsed)
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks nice improvement! – Dave Anderson Mar 7 '12 at 15:13

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