Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code for a fade animation in Javascript:

var ticks = 20;
function fadein(tick,element){
    if(element == null)
        return;

    element.style.opacity = tick/ticks;
    if(tick < ticks) {
        var s = "fadein(" + (tick+1) + "," + element + ")";
        setTimeout(s, 500/ticks);
    }
}

The problem is this line:

var s = "fadein(" + (tick+1) + "," + element + ")";

Element is turned into its string representation and causes an error on the next iteration. I know I could do this if all my elements had IDs by passing the eid, but I want to fade in a lot of different things (at different times) and don't want to have to name each one. Is there a way to do this in js?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use an anonymous function instead of the string to call setTimeout. That way you have easy access to all variables inside the fadein function.

Besides this it is considered bad practise to use setTimeoutor setInterval with a string parameter.

var ticks = 20;
function fadein(tick,element){
    if(element == null)
        return;

    element.style.opacity = tick/ticks;
    if(tick < ticks) {
        setTimeout( function() { fadein( tick+1, element ); }, 500/ticks);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
it is considered bad practise to use setTimeout or setInterval with a string parameter. Why? –  RobG Mar 5 '12 at 13:37
1  
@RobG To cite MDN: "Using this syntax is not recommended for the same reasons as using eval()" with a link to Don't use eval! –  Sirko Mar 5 '12 at 13:48
    
Cool. Wherever you write the phrase "bad practice" or "best practice" or similar, always explain why. –  RobG Mar 5 '12 at 23:21

Use a function instead of a string:

var f = function () { fadein(tick+1, element) };
window.setTimeout(f, 500/ticks);

This way you can send the element as a parameter without having to turn it into a string representation.

Using a string in the setTimeout method was once the only way, but nowadays it's considered better practice to use a function.

share|improve this answer

you can pass a function instead of your string... pure js

setTimeout(function(){.....}, 500/ticks);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.