Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is my sample code:

<?php

$t = 0;

switch( $t )
{
    case 'add':
        echo 'add';
        break;
    default:
        echo 'default';
        break;
}

echo "<br/>";

echo system('php --version');

This is the output (tested on codepad.org - result is the same):

add
PHP 5.3.6-13ubuntu3.6 with Suhosin-Patch (cli) (built: Feb 11 2012 03:26:01) Copyright (c) 1997-2011 The PHP Group Zend Engine v2.3.0, Copyright (c) 1998-2011 Zend Technologies Zend Engine v2.3.0, Copyright (c) 1998-2011 Zend Technologies

What is wrong here?

share|improve this question
    
great question. –  jere Mar 5 '12 at 13:49
    
I know, it looks stupid, but this situation happened in my ZF app. That $t variable was actually $this->id property which has its parameter from the $_REQUEST array (from url). And this in my case was always string and now I know, that if required param is missed then instead of setting it to an empty string it sets this property to an integer(0).. –  Vitaly Dyatlov Mar 5 '12 at 13:56
1  
it wasn't sarcasm! i really meant to say it was a good question :) –  jere Mar 5 '12 at 14:08
    
It's not. You forgot to describe what you expect to happen instead of what does happen. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 5 '12 at 14:36
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your variable $t has the integer value 0. With the switch statement you tell PHP to compare it first with the value 'add' (a string). PHP does this by converting 'add' to an integer, and due to the rules of the conversion the result turns out to be 0.

As a result, the first branch is taken -- which may be surprising, but it's also expected.

You would see the expected behavior if you did

$t = "0";

Now, both $t and 'add' are strings so there is no magic conversion going on and of course they compare unequal.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Yes, forcing a value to be string solves the issue! –  Vitaly Dyatlov Mar 5 '12 at 13:49
add comment

that's because you are comparing an int with an string.. if you force the conversion of 'add' to int it will be 0.. to "fix" your switch statement you can replace

switch( $t )

to

switch( $t . '' )

this way telling the server he should use the string value of t (or any other way to achieve this)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.