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I am new to oop in Javascript and just need to get to grips with this.

If I have a class with properties

function myClass(){
this.foo=null;
}

I then use inheritance to create a child class

myChild.prototype = new myClass(); 

function myChild(){
alert(this.foo);
}

How do I set the property of foo when instantiating the child class e.g I want to alert 'bar'. I don't want to simply pass 'bar' to myChild as I have a list of properties to set that are relevant to a method in myClass and not myChild.

var newChild = new myChild();
share|improve this question
    
Your first snippet is missing (), and if you want the string bar then you need to quote it. –  pimvdb Mar 5 '12 at 14:25
    
edited to fix typos –  user1209203 Mar 5 '12 at 14:26
    
I'm not sure where you want to pass "bar". Which function should accept it and set it? The child class should set it but you don't want to pass it to the child class - could you elaborate please? –  pimvdb Mar 5 '12 at 14:28
    
I want to set foo as bar on instantiation but not inside myChild, on the instantiation line. –  user1209203 Mar 5 '12 at 14:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can actually find the answer to this question also in my answer to previous question and it is similar to inheritance in other languages.

If you extend a class, the constructor function of the child class has to accept its own arguments and the one for the parent class. So assuming you have:

function Parent(a) {
    this.foo = a;
};

// and 

function Child(b, a) {
    Parent.call(this, a); // executes the parent constructor for this instance
    this.bar = b;
    alert(this.foo);
};

inherits(Parent, Child);

(the implementation of inherits can be found in this answer).

Inside Child you have to call the construtor of the parent class and pass the parameters, similar how you do it in Java or Python.

If you have many parameters, then you can make use of the arguments object, to make things a bit easier:

function Parent(a, b, c, d) {...};

function Child(e, f) {
   // c and d are parameters for `Child`
   // arguments[0] == e
   // arguments[1] == f
   // all other arguments are passed to Parent, the following
   // creates a sub array arguments[2..n]
   Parent.apply(this, [].slice.call(arguments, 2); 
   /...
}

// later

var child = new Child(e, f, a, b, c, d);

In general, myChild.prototype = new myClass(); is not a good inheritance pattern as most of the time, classes expect some arguments. This won't execute the parent constructor for each instance but only once for all instances.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks felix answer accepted as it does answer my question but I have realised I can do this more simply by instantiating the object with some parameters then calling a method with the extra parameters on a new line instead of trying to do it all in one go. –  user1209203 Mar 5 '12 at 17:32

You could just set the property in the child's constructor like so:

myChild.prototype = new myClass(); 

function myChild(){
   this.foo = "bar";
}

Is that what you want?

Or if you want to be flexible about what foo contains in each instance you could just set it right after instantiation of the child class:

 var child = new myChild();
 child.foo = "bar";
share|improve this answer

Parameterize your construction method.

function myClass(foo){
    this.foo=foo;
}
myChild.prototype = new myClass('bar'); 

function myChild(){
    alert(this.foo);
}
var newChild = new myChild();

or:

 function myClass(){
        this.foo=null;
    }
    myChild.prototype = new myClass(); 
    myChild.prototype.foo = 'bar';
    function myChild(){
        alert(this.foo);
    }
    var newChild = new myChild();
share|improve this answer
    
I can't do that as each object will be getting passed different values –  user1209203 Mar 5 '12 at 14:38
    
This is what you want? myChild.prototype.foo = 'bar'; –  Mike Lin Mar 5 '12 at 14:43

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