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In the socket.io acknowledgement example we see a client's send/emit being called back with the server's response. Is the same functionality available in the reverse direction - i.e. how does the server confirm client reception for a send/emit from the server? It would be nice to have a send/emit callback even just to indicate reception success. Didn't see this functionality documented anywhere... Thanks!

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OK, tested it and it appears to be symmetrical.... (too bad docs are unclear on this). However, while testing I hit another issue: if client disconnects prior to sending a response, the emit/send callback on the sender never gets fired. Seems to me that the API may be improved if the callback mechanism be modified to include an error parameter, e.g.: socket.emit('ferret', 'tobi', function (err, data) {....... –  Mark Mar 5 '12 at 17:30
    
I posted a direct question regarding my latest issue here: link, please disregard this previous Q, thanks. –  Mark Mar 6 '12 at 5:03
    
If you found the answer yourself there is nothing wrong with answering your own question and accepting the answer - stackoverflow.com/help/self-answer This question comes up on Google so it would be a good thing to answer it. –  Killah May 8 at 13:44

1 Answer 1

Looking in the socket.io source I found that indeed ACKs are supported for server-sent messages (but not in broadcasts!) (lines 115-123 of socket.io/lib/socket.js):

if ('function' == typeof args[args.length - 1]) {
    if (this._rooms || (this.flags && this.flags.broadcast)) {
        throw new Error('Callbacks are not supported when broadcasting');
    }

    debug('emitting packet with ack id %d', this.nsp.ids);
    this.acks[this.nsp.ids] = args.pop();
    packet.id = this.nsp.ids++;
}
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