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MYSQL Left join A.table and b.table while retaining a.table id when there is no b.table match.

SELECT * FROM sales_customer a LEFT JOIN sales_contact b
ON a.customer_id = b.customer_id
ORDER BY CASE WHEN company_name = '' THEN lname ELSE company_name END ASC

Gets me this:

Array (
  [0] => 54
  [customer_id] => 
)

When there is no b.table match.

I need this:

Array (
  [0] => 54
  [customer_id] => 29 
)

Any suggestions?

The solution below worked. Thanks for your help.

SELECT *, COALESCE(a.customer_id, 0) AS customer_id FROM sales_customer a LEFT OUTER JOIN sales_contact b ON a.customer_id = b.customer_id ORDER BY CASE WHEN company_name = '' THEN lname ELSE company_name END ASC

share|improve this question
    
Do SELECT [0], [a.customer_id] – ScottJShea Mar 5 '12 at 14:48
    
That statement seems 100% logical however I cant seem to get the syntax to work correctly. Replace the SELECT * with your suggestion? – Lawrence Gadette Mar 5 '12 at 15:08
    
@ruakh covered it better than I – ScottJShea Mar 5 '12 at 15:23
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use it like this:

SELECT 
    *,
    COALESCE(b.customer_id, 0) AS customer_id
FROM sales_customer a 
LEFT JOIN sales_contact b ON a.customer_id = b.customer_id
ORDER BY 
    CASE WHEN company_name = '' THEN lname ELSE company_name END ASC
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, first i would like to thank everyone for their help. Second the answer that worked best for me was actually a variation of this one. Ill post the solution above. Thanks again. – Lawrence Gadette Mar 5 '12 at 15:22

Try using COALESCE(). It will return the first non-NULL value.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you're misunderstanding the OP's problem. a.customer_id will never be NULL. – ruakh Mar 5 '12 at 15:08

Instead of writing SELECT * ("select all fields"), you should specify the fields you actually want: SELECT 54 AS `0`, a.customer_id, ... FROM .... That's better practice in general, not just for this.

If you really want to write SELECT * to select all fields, you can still add additional fields to the end, which in PHP will overwrite earlier like-named fields: SELECT *, a.customer_id FROM ....

share|improve this answer
    
Got it, and I should have known this. Practice makes perfect. Thanks for your help. – Lawrence Gadette Mar 5 '12 at 15:09
    
@LawrenceGadette: You're welcome. – ruakh Mar 5 '12 at 15:09

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