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I read few questions here on SO about this topic which seems yet confusing to me. I've just begun to learn C++ and I haven't studied templates yet or operator overloading and such.

Now is there a simple way to overload

class My {
public:
    int get(int);
    char get(int);
}

without templates or strange behavior? or should I just

class My {
public:
    int get_int(int);
    char get_char(int);
}

?

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6  
Imagine if you could do this - you're not required to use the return type at all, so which method would get(int); on its own line call? –  Adam V Mar 5 '12 at 22:35
2  
possible duplicate of Function overloading by return type? –  user195488 May 29 '13 at 13:52
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7 Answers

up vote 32 down vote accepted

No there isn't. You can't overload methods based on return type.

Overload resolution takes into account the function signature. A function signature is made up of:

  • function name
  • cv-qualifiers
  • parameter types

And here's the quote:

1.3.11 signature

the information about a function that participates in overload resolution (13.3): its parameter-type-list (8.3.5) and, if the function is a class member, the cv-qualifiers (if any) on the function itself and the class in which the member function is declared. [...]

Options:

1) change the method name:

class My {
public:
    int getInt(int);
    char getChar(int);
};

2) out parameter:

class My {
public:
    void get(int, int&);
    void get(int, char&);
}

3) templates... overkill in this case.

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6  
You can't overload a normal function on return type, but the compiler will choose between conversion operators based on the resulting type; you can leverage off this to create a proxy which effectively acts as if you'd overloaded on return type. –  James Kanze Mar 5 '12 at 15:32
    
I'm now reading about templates. Could you please make an example of it here? Doesn't My<char> var; var.get(3); work in this case? –  Jefffrey Mar 5 '12 at 15:33
1  
@JeffPigarelli The template solution means member templates: My::get<T>(int). It's a valid alternative _if 1) you have to handle a lot of different types, all with the same basic code (e.g. boost::lexical_cast<T>( someStringValue ), or you have to be able to call these functions from some other template (myMy.get<T>( i ), where T is an argument of this other template. Otherwise, as Luchian says, they're overkill. –  James Kanze Mar 5 '12 at 16:27
13  
Note that the reason you can't overload based on return type is that C++ lets you discard the value of a function call. So if you simply called my.get(0); the compiler would have no way to decide which piece of code to execute. –  benzado Mar 5 '12 at 17:12
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It's possible, but I'm not sure that it's a technique I'd recommend for beginners. As in other cases, when you want the choice of functions to depend on how the return value is used, you use a proxy; first define functions like getChar and getInt, then a generic get() which returns a Proxy like this:

class Proxy
{
    My const* myOwner;
public:
    Proxy( My const* owner ) : myOwner( owner ) {}
    operator int() const
    {
        return myOwner->getInt();
    }
    operator char() const
    {
        return myOwner->getChar();
    }
};

Extend it to as many types as you need.

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4  
+1, although a corner case, the conversion operator is actually overloaded on return type, and can be leveraged to get this feature about everywhere. –  Matthieu M. Mar 5 '12 at 16:03
1  
@MatthieuM. About everywhere, but with the usual caveats concerning implicit conversions. You do run the risk of introducing ambiguities that wouldn't otherwise be there. In the case of a Proxy, however, I think the risk is minor---you're not going to have instances of the Proxy type other than in the case where you want the implicit conversion. Note too that the conversion in the proxy counts as one user defined conversion. If you need std::string, and the proxy only offers operator char const*(), it's not going to work. –  James Kanze Mar 5 '12 at 16:30
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No, you can't overload by return type; only by parameter types, and const/volatile qualifiers.

One alternative would be to "return" using a reference argument:

void get(int, int&);
void get(int, char&);

although I would probably either use a template, or differently-named functions like your second example.

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There is no way to overload by return type in C++. Without using templates, using get_int and get_char will be the best you can do.

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Just to be sure: Something like template <class T> T get(int) would work? –  Niklas B. Mar 5 '12 at 15:09
4  
Yes, @Niklas, but you'd have to call it as get<int> or get<char>, which doesn't really gain you much over get_int and get_char if you're not also using other template features. –  Rob Kennedy Mar 5 '12 at 15:13
    
@Rob: That's what I thought. Thanks :) –  Niklas B. Mar 5 '12 at 15:14
    
Could you be a little more specific, please, @Netcoder? –  Rob Kennedy Mar 5 '12 at 15:24
1  
That's perfectly standard, @Netcoder, but it's not a case of the compiler deducing just the return type, which you suggested was possible. In your example, the compiler deduces the argument type, and once it knows that, it fills in the value of T everywhere else, including the return type. I expected you to give an example of the compiler deducing T for the function in Niklas's first comment. –  Rob Kennedy Mar 5 '12 at 16:25
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You can't overload methods based on return types. Your best bet is to create two functions with slightly different syntax, such as in your second code snippet.

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you can't overload a function based on the return type of the function. you can overlead based on the type and number of arguments that this function takes.

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You can think this way:

You have:

  int get(int);
  char get(int);

And, it is not mandatory to collect the return value of the function while invoking.

Now, You invoke

  get(10);  -> there is an ambiguity here which function to invoke. 

So, No meaning if overloading is allowed based on the return type.

Happy if it helps somehow!.

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