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What is the best way to remove a set from a collection, but still keep the items that were removed in a separate collection?

I have written an extension method that does that, but I think there must be a better way. Here is my function:

public static List<T> FindAndRemove<T>(this List<T> lst, Predicate<T> match)
{
    List<T> ret = lst.FindAll(match);
    lst.RemoveAll(match);
    return ret;
}

And you would use it like this:

List<String> myList = new List<String>();
myList.Add("ABC");
myList.Add("DEF");
myList.Add("ABC");
List<String> removed = myList.FindAndRemove(x => x == "ABC");
// myList now contains 1 item (DEF)
// removed now contains 2 items (ABC, ABC)

I'm not 100% sure what goes on behind the scenes in the FindAll and RemoveAll methods, but I imagine a better way would be to somehow "transfer" items from one list to the other.

share|improve this question
1  
Your solution is the most efficient. – Kirill Polishchuk Mar 5 '12 at 15:31
2  
You implementation looks fine to me. Copy is a cheap operation in .Net so there is no reason for "transfer" (unless you need some thread/exception safety that an object is never in more than one collection at a time) – adrianm Mar 5 '12 at 15:43
    
I agreee. Using the built in LINQ is the purpose to make life easier.. what goes on behine the scenes will be the best solution chosen by MS. Because you are in C# that is fine to the eye, but VB you would daisy chain your query return = lst.FindAll(match).RemoveAll(match) to keep in-line with read the code style. – ppumkin Mar 5 '12 at 16:26
1  
@ppumkin The custom extension method isn't necessary though. You can just use a .Where() and make it not equal to what you want and then ToList it and BAM. – Jetti Mar 5 '12 at 16:31

Op's answer is the best out of the proposed and suggested solutions so far. Here are timings on my machine:

public static class Class1
{
    // 21ms on my machine
    public static List<T> FindAndRemove<T>(this List<T> lst, Predicate<T> match)
    {
        List<T> ret = lst.FindAll(match);
        lst.RemoveAll(match);
        return ret;
    }

    // 538ms on my machine
    public static List<T> MimoAnswer<T>(this List<T> lst, Predicate<T> match)
    {
        var ret = new List<T>();
        int i = 0;
        while (i < lst.Count)
        {
            T t = lst[i];
            if (!match(t))
            {
                i++;
            }
            else
            {
                lst.RemoveAt(i);
                ret.Add(t);
            }
        }
        return ret;
    }

    // 40ms on my machine
    public static IEnumerable<T> GuvanteSuggestion<T>(this IList<T> list, Func<T, bool> predicate)
    {
        var removals = new List<Action>();

        foreach (T item in list.Where(predicate))
        {
            T copy = item;
            yield return copy;
            removals.Add(() => list.Remove(copy));
        }

        // this hides the cost of processing though the work is still expensive
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Parallel.ForEach(removals, remove => remove()));
    }
}

[TestFixture]
public class Tester : PerformanceTester
{
    [Test]
    public void Test()
    {
        List<int> ints = Enumerable.Range(1, 100000).ToList();
        IEnumerable<int> enumerable = ints.GuvanteSuggestion(i => i % 2 == 0);
        Assert.That(enumerable.Count(), Is.EqualTo(50000));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for providing the timings – Valamas - AUS May 24 '12 at 21:58

I don't agree that it is the most efficient - you are calling the predicate match twice on each element of the list.

I'd do it like this:

    var ret = new List<T>(); 
    var remaining = new List<T>(); 
    foreach (T t in lst) {
        if (match(t)) 
        { 
            ret.Add(t); 
        } 
        else 
        { 
            remaining.Add(t); 
        } 
    }
    lst.Clear();
    lst.AddRange(remaining);
    return ret; 
share|improve this answer
    
OMG So c++ days.. iterating through a list.. not .NET'ish at all. – ppumkin Mar 5 '12 at 16:22
    
Iterating through a list once, and doing the least work to achieve the required result. What's not to like? – Neil Moss Mar 5 '12 at 16:26
1  
@ppumkin: The alternative is to create a list to hold the found results and iterate through it afterwards, since you cannot mutate a list in a foreach. – Guvante Mar 5 '12 at 16:31
    
@Neil Moss - I never said its wrong.. I tried to imply its old.. yes. But mostly It not .NET structure. That is all :) -PS Looks like JAVA or C . In any MS.NET Exam this answer is WRONG WRONG WRONG.. not my fault. – ppumkin Mar 5 '12 at 16:46
1  
The worst performance... – Kirill Polishchuk Mar 5 '12 at 17:21

Depending upon the size of your collection, you might want to implement it as a HashSet rather than a List. In sufficiently large collections (how large is "sufficient" has been somewhat dependent on what is in the collection, in my experience), HashSets can be much, much faster at finding items within themselves than Lists.

share|improve this answer

What you should be trying to do is partition your original list into two new lists. The implementation should work on any IEnumerable, not just lists, and should assume that the source is immutable. See this post on partitioning: LINQ Partition List into Lists of 8 members. I think MoreLinq has it covered already.

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