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When using an IE specific font-face declaration like below:

@font-face{
    font-family:'Arial Narrow';
    font-style:normal;
    font-weight:normal;
    src:url('../fonts/ArialNarrow.eot');
    src:local('Arial Narrow'),
    local('ArialNarrow'),
    url('../fonts/ArialNarrow.eot') format('embedded-opentype'),
    url('../fonts/ArialNarrow.woff') format('woff');
}

From what I can see, even though the font exists as a system font, it insists on downloading the font that my sheet suggests every time. In order to be more efficient, is there a way to only download the font in IE if it's necessary?

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2 Answers

If you're specifying "Arial Narrow" I would suggest not using @font-face altogether. It's a very, very common font, and the vast majority of users (Windows & Mac) will have it installed. I would simply specify a fallback font in your normal font-stack:

body {
 font-family: "Arial Narrow", Arial, Helvetica, "sans-serif";
}

If you're using a less-common (i.e. 'non-web-safe') font, then your @font-face is set up exactly how it should be.

Here is a great resource on how common particular fonts are on the web:

http://www.speaking-in-styles.com/web-typography/Web-Safe-Fonts/

Arial Narrow gets a 'likely'.

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Normally I would like to avoid this, but I realized anyone who doesn't have Office 2007 or later on Windows XP does not have the Arial Narrow font. I use this font in a very specific way to show pricing on my company's site and the boss likes it. Unfortunately, with 100k+ visitors a month, I have to be very careful. Is it just a quirk of IE that it downloads every time? Great link, btw! –  justiceorjustus Mar 5 '12 at 15:23
    
Does your layout totally break if someone only has Arial (regular)? Can it be made more flexible so that if Arial loads, the layout at least holds together? Trying to get one, and only one, font to load for a visitor kinda fights the way the web is designed. It's really a different facet to 'graceful degradation' - you provide an optimal experience for someone who has the font installed (which is the vast majority of users), but a not-broken experience for someone who doesn't. As for it downloading, I think any browser will do that if you've called out a file in @font-face. –  chipcullen Mar 5 '12 at 15:31
    
Actually, only IE. I've experimented with FF, Chrome, Opera and Safari with font-face declarations and drastically different fonts such as Times New Roman for Arial Narrow. Example: I have Narrow as a system font, load the page and it shows Arial Narrow. Delete it as a system font and it shows Times New Roman. TLDR: IE is stupid. It wouldn't be inefficient if it utilized the localname property. –  justiceorjustus Mar 5 '12 at 15:38
    
Interesting - yeah, I've given up looking for reason and logic in IE. Thanks for the info - it's good to keep that behavior in mind. Are the majority of your users using IE (I'm guessing so)? I guess it's a judgement call, then - do you force every IE user to download the font and ensure they see Arial Narrow, or not take the performance hit and rely on what they have installed? I personally would favor the later approach. –  chipcullen Mar 5 '12 at 15:42
    
~61% with 60% of those using IE8 or lower. I've done some extensive testing and I'll post my conclusions as an answer. –  justiceorjustus Mar 5 '12 at 17:44
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With this declaration for IE6+:

@font-face{
    font-family:'Arial Narrow';
    font-style:normal;
    font-weight:normal;
    src:url('../fonts/ArialNarrow.eot');
    src:local('Arial Narrow'),
    local('ArialNarrow'),
    url('../fonts/ArialNarrow.eot') format('embedded-opentype'),
    url('../fonts/ArialNarrow.woff') format('woff');
}

This declaration for FF/Opera/Chrome/Safari:

@font-face{
    font-family:'Arial Narrow';
    font-style:normal;
    font-weight:normal;
    src:local('Arial Narrow'),
    local('ArialNarrow'),
    url('../fonts/ArialNarrow.ttf') format('truetype');
}

IE 6/7/8 and lower/IE9+ WITH compatibility mode on: Downloads the linked font no matter what.

Firefox/Opera/Chrome/Safari/IE9+ WITH compatibility mode off: Uses system font when available. Downloads the linked font when system font is unavailable.

Compatibility mode is forced off with:

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge" />

Good news: Fonts are cached in all browsers. They only have to be downloaded once.

Final Answer: There is no way to avoid an @font-face file download in IE 6/7/8 and IE 9+ with compatibility mode on.

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