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I have an URL like this:

http://site.com/galleries/galleryname/imageID123/lightbox/

and using a script to replace the lightbox URL with nothing (when lightbox overlay is closed):

document.URL.replace('lightbox/', '')

Things get messy when user has a gallery also named "lightbox", then the URL is:

http://site.com/galleries/lightbox/imageID123/lightbox/

I need to make sure that docment.URL.replace will replace only the last occurrence of the word.

share|improve this question
1  
What about http://site.com/galleries/galleryname/imageID123/lightbox/test/ - should this also match? – Tim Pietzcker Mar 5 '12 at 15:24
    
Such URL pattern will never exist (code status 404), so I'm not worried about it. – DominiqueBal Mar 5 '12 at 15:27
up vote 4 down vote accepted

try this

document.URL.replace(/lightbox\/$/, '')

Im talking as the parser :

document.URL.replace('lightbox/', '')

Ok , whenever i find lightbox/ i will replace it with "empty" but wait ! there's more than 1 . so I'll do it .

but wait ! since you didnt supply the g flag - i will do it only to the first. (if you did supply the g flag it will replace ALL occurrences !)

any way -

we dont want that.

so how do we tell him only the last ?

well use the $ sign. which represent the end of the string.

so i want you to replace only lightbox which has / after and the / is the END OF THE WORD.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1, but you should also explain what that means. – ruakh Mar 5 '12 at 15:19
    
Thanks, explanation please? – DominiqueBal Mar 5 '12 at 15:20
    
@DominiqueBal see my edit – Royi Namir Mar 5 '12 at 15:24
    
He's looking for "lightbox/" at the end of the line. The "$" tells it to look for the end of the line. And since "/" is a special character, it gets escaped like so: "\/". – SDGator Mar 5 '12 at 15:26

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