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(In this post, let np be shorthand for numpy.)

Suppose a is a (n + k)‑dimensional np.ndarray object, for some integers n > 1 and k > 1. (IOW, n + k > 3 is the value of a.ndim). I want to enumerate a over its first n dimensions; this means that, at each iteration, the enumerator/iterator produces a pair whose first element is a tuple ii of n indices, and second element is the k‑dimensional sub-ndarray at a[ii] .

Granted, it is not difficult to code a function to do this (in fact, I give an example of such a function below), but I want to know this:

does numpy provide any special syntax or functions for carrying out this type of "partial" enumeration?

(Normally, when I want to iterate over an multidimensional np.ndarray object, I use np.ndenumerate, but it wouldn't help here, because (as far as I can tell) np.ndenumerate would iterate over all n + k dimensions.)

Assuming that the answer to the question above is yes, then there's this follow-up:

what about the case where the n dimensions to iterate over are not contiguous?

(In this case, the first element of the pair returned at each iteration by the enumerator/iterator would be a tuple of r > n elements, some of which would be a special value denoting "all", e.g. slice(None); the second element of this pair would still be an ndarray of length k.)

Thanks!


The code below hopefully clarifies the problem specification. The function partial_enumerate does what I would like to do using any special numpy constructs available for the purpose. Following the definition of partial_enumerate is a simple example for the case n = k = 2.

import numpy as np
import itertools as it
def partial_enumerate(nda, n):
  """Enumerate over the first N dimensions of the numpy.ndarray NDA.

  Returns an iterator of pairs.  The first element of each pair is a tuple 
  of N integers, corresponding to a partial index I into NDA; the second element
  is the subarray of NDA at I.
  """

  # ERROR CHECKING & HANDLING OMITTED
  for ii in it.product(*[range(d) for d in nda.shape[:n]]):
    yield ii, nda[ii]

a = np.zeros((2, 3, 4, 5))
for ii, vv in partial_enumerate(a, 2):
    print ii, vv.shape

Each line of the output is a "pair of tuples", where the first tuple represents a partial set of n coordinates in a, and the second one represents the shape of the k‑dimensional subarray of a at those partial coordinates; (the value of this second pair is the same for all lines, as expected from the regularity of the array):

(0, 0) (4, 5)
(0, 1) (4, 5)
(0, 2) (4, 5)
(1, 0) (4, 5)
(1, 1) (4, 5)
(1, 2) (4, 5)

In contrast, iterating over np.ndenumerate(a) in this case would result in a.size iterations, each visiting an individual cell of a.

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1  
"what about the case where the dimensions to iterate over are not contiguous?" I'm not sure that is possible with a pure numpy array. The entire array is stored in a contiguous block of memory, unlike a standard python list. As an example, do you mean a 2D array with the result of [row.shape for row in a] = [1,2,1,3, ...]? –  Hooked Mar 5 '12 at 16:29
    
"In this case, the first element of the pair returned at each iteration by the enumerator/iterator would be a tuple of r > n elements, some of which would be a special value denoting "all", e.g. slice(None); the second element of this pair would still be an ndarray of length k." This doesn't make sense to me, because it creates an inconsistent idiom. Instead of consisting of single item indices only, it would consist of a mix of single item indices and sequences of indices. It would therefore cease to be a bijection between indices and sub-arrays; one index could refer to many sub-arrays. –  senderle Mar 7 '12 at 17:38
    
I believe this would result in an ndarray of length k + j where j is the number of sequences (i.e. non-single-item-indices) in the indexing tuple. –  senderle Mar 7 '12 at 17:38

2 Answers 2

I think you're looking for the function ndindex in numpy. Just take a slice of the subarray that you want:

from numpy import *

# Create the array
A = zeros((2,3,4,5))

# Identify the subindex you're looking for
idx = ndindex(A.shape[:2])

# Iterate through the array
[(x, A[x].shape) for x in idx]

This gives the expected result:

[((0, 0), (4, 5)), ((0, 1), (4, 5)), ((0, 2), (4, 5)), ((1, 0), (4, 5)), ((1, 1), (4, 5)), ((1, 2), (4, 5))]
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You can use the numpy broadcasting rules to generate a cartesian product. The numpy.ix_ function creates a list of the appropriate arrays. It's equivalent to the below:

>>> def pseudo_ix_gen(*arrays):
...     base_shape = [1 for arr in arrays]
...     for dim, arr in enumerate(arrays):
...         shape = base_shape[:]
...         shape[dim] = len(arr)
...         yield numpy.array(arr).reshape(shape)
... 
>>> def pseudo_ix_(*arrays):
...     return list(pseudo_ix_gen(*arrays))

Or, more concisely:

>>> def pseudo_ix_(*arrays):
...     shapes = numpy.diagflat([len(a) - 1 for a in arrays]) + 1
...     return [numpy.array(a).reshape(s) for a, s in zip(arrays, shapes)]

The result is a list of broadcastable arrays:

>>> numpy.ix_(*[[2, 4], [1, 3], [0, 2]])
[array([[[2]],

       [[4]]]), array([[[1],
        [3]]]), array([[[0, 2]]])]

Compare this to the result of numpy.ogrid:

>>> numpy.ogrid[0:2, 0:2, 0:2]
[array([[[0]],

       [[1]]]), array([[[0],
        [1]]]), array([[[0, 1]]])]

As you can see, it's the same, but numpy.ix_ allows you to use non-consecutive indices. Now when we apply the numpy broadcasting rules, we get a cartesian product:

>>> list(numpy.broadcast(*numpy.ix_(*[[2, 4], [1, 3], [0, 2]])))
[(2, 1, 0), (2, 1, 2), (2, 3, 0), (2, 3, 2), 
 (4, 1, 0), (4, 1, 2), (4, 3, 0), (4, 3, 2)]

If, instead of passing the result of numpy.ix_ to numpy.broadcast, we use it to index an array, we get this:

>>> a = numpy.arange(6 ** 4).reshape((6, 6, 6, 6))
>>> a[numpy.ix_(*[[2, 4], [1, 3], [0, 2]])]
array([[[[468, 469, 470, 471, 472, 473],
         [480, 481, 482, 483, 484, 485]],

        [[540, 541, 542, 543, 544, 545],
         [552, 553, 554, 555, 556, 557]]],


       [[[900, 901, 902, 903, 904, 905],
         [912, 913, 914, 915, 916, 917]],

        [[972, 973, 974, 975, 976, 977],
         [984, 985, 986, 987, 988, 989]]]])

However, caveat emptor. Broadcastable arrays are useful for indexing, but if you literally want to enumerate the values, you might be better off using itertools.product:

>>> %timeit list(itertools.product(range(5), repeat=5))
10000 loops, best of 3: 196 us per loop
>>> %timeit list(numpy.broadcast(*numpy.ix_(*([range(5)] * 5))))
100 loops, best of 3: 2.74 ms per loop

So if you're incorporating a for loop anyway, then itertools.product will likely be faster. Still, you can use the above methods to get some similar data structures in pure numpy:

>> pgrid_idx = numpy.ix_(*[[2, 4], [1, 3], [0, 2]])
>>> sub_indices = numpy.rec.fromarrays(numpy.indices((6, 6, 6)))
>>> a[pgrid_idx].reshape((8, 6))
array([[468, 469, 470, 471, 472, 473],
       [480, 481, 482, 483, 484, 485],
       [540, 541, 542, 543, 544, 545],
       [552, 553, 554, 555, 556, 557],
       [900, 901, 902, 903, 904, 905],
       [912, 913, 914, 915, 916, 917],
       [972, 973, 974, 975, 976, 977],
       [984, 985, 986, 987, 988, 989]])
>>> sub_indices[pgrid_idx].reshape((8,))
rec.array([(2, 1, 0), (2, 1, 2), (2, 3, 0), (2, 3, 2), 
           (4, 1, 0), (4, 1, 2), (4, 3, 0), (4, 3, 2)], 
          dtype=[('f0', '<i8'), ('f1', '<i8'), ('f2', '<i8')])
share|improve this answer
2  
I believe your product_grid is the same as numpy.ix_. –  Bi Rico Mar 6 '12 at 21:32
1  
@Bago, nothing like reinventing the wheel, is there? –  senderle Mar 6 '12 at 22:27

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