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I want to have a regex that test whether a phrase is a correct name or not. It should be something like: /^[\w\s\.]+$/

The problem is that the regex above won't match against name like "Noël Burch", since it contains 'ë' character. On other hand, I can't use /^[\D]+$/ because it will match against phrase like "This is %not a *name".

Is there a simple regex that can match against common European name?

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4  
What about "Fingal O'Flaherty-Smith"? –  Johnsyweb Mar 5 '12 at 16:32
3  
or Adélaïde or Aimée or... anyway, what exactly is a european name? –  Simon Woker Mar 5 '12 at 16:42
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You should probably read this article first. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Mar 5 '12 at 16:56
2  
Icelanders must face regexp discrimination constantly with names like Hreiðar. I don't know that there's a list of accented characters that's easily put into a regexp. Your username alone would fail nearly every test. –  tadman Mar 5 '12 at 16:58
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To elaborate on what @Catcall said, the likely real solution is to not try and "verify" what is/isn't a name because you'll almost always still have someone's name fail to match. –  Andrew Marshall Mar 5 '12 at 17:29

3 Answers 3

You could check for generic words that begin with an uppercase letter. So for the name

someName = "Nicklos Frappapapopadopolos";

you could use the regex ^\p{Lu}{1}\p{Ll}+\s+\p{Lu}{1}\p{Ll}+$ which assumes there is only a first and second name and that each name begins with an uppercase letter.

However, I am not sure if \p{Ll} will work with European characters.

Edit: Having worked out that the regex section \p{Ll} matches European you can now extend the regex for arbitrary long names like

someOtherNameI = "Victor PickPockaDopolas The Third"

the ragex to match this would be something like ^(\s?\p{Lu}\p{Ll}+\s?)+$. This matches the above but not

someOtherNameII = "Victor PickPockaDopolas The third"

This may-or-may-not be another problem.

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Yes \p{Ll} works with European character in Ruby (1.9). –  Aleksander Pohl Mar 5 '12 at 17:18

Try doing the following:

^[\w{list of characters}\s.]+$

So basically, if you have something like Emily Brontë it should be returned with just the following modification.

^[\w{ë}\s.]+$

If you know of the specific locales, and your regex supports locales, you should be able to pass these in. Usually passing in the UNICODE directive is something like this:

^[\w{L}\s.]+$

or

^[\w{UNICODE}\s.]+$

That being said, using \w is still going to allow numbers to be passed in. Is that acceptable for your case? I mean even Chad 85, spells his name Chad Ochocinco.

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Considering all the special letters involved in names, you are probably better off checking for characters that should NOT appear and that people might use if they're misunderstanding the form. These would be:
- numbers
- common punctuation: _ @ , ; : < > | + * / ( ) [ ] ! ? " #

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