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I'm developing a simple application in Windows 8 metro applications and I m trying to retrieve files from PicturesLibrary, the code I put is the following :

public async void Initialize()
{
    IReadOnlyList<StorageFile> storageFiles = await KnownFolders.PicturesLibrary.GetFilesAsync();              
    foreach (var storageFile in storageFiles)
    {   
        BitmapImage bitmapImage = new BitmapImage();
        FileRandomAccessStream stream = (FileRandomAccessStream)await storageFile.OpenAsync(FileAccessMode.Read);
        bitmapImage.SetSource(stream);
        Image image = new Image();
        image.Source = bitmapImage;
        Images.Add(image);
    }
}

then I show these images using their ImageSource. The problem that I am meeting is that sometimes it shows them all, somethimes one or two , sometimes it deosn't show any image, I don't understand if this is because of the awaitable method GetFileAsync() or other things I may be missing.

Thanks in advance :)

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why not try the NON-async method and see if you consistently get all files? –  jberger Mar 5 '12 at 18:10
    
@jberger - no such API available, Metro has lots of async-only like Silverlight did before. –  James Manning Mar 5 '12 at 18:35
    
I'm not familiar with async/await yet, but it appears StorageFolder.GetFilesAsync() returns an IAsyncOperation<IReadOnlyList> which in turn has a Completed event.. –  jberger Mar 5 '12 at 18:43
    
What exactly happens? Are the images in storageFiles, but they are not shown? Or are they missing from storageFiles? Also, you should not write async void methods if you don't have to. –  svick Mar 5 '12 at 20:08
    
Hows your memory usage? Kind of looks like you are reading all images into memory. –  Tristan Aug 9 '13 at 19:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would guess it's just a timing issue, but doing a breakpoint or trace point in the foreach would tell for sure.

Try changing this to return Task and then await it in the caller of you can

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thanks @James, Yeah I think It's a timing issue as you said, I tried some break points within that foreach loop and it worked better , but as I am not really familiar with async operations I am not really sure how implement your solution, I will be very thankful if you give me some links for that, thanks again . –  user1038031 Mar 5 '12 at 18:58
    
Just change the void to Task in the method declaration then have the caller await or .Wait() depending on whether the caller could/should be async as well –  James Manning Mar 5 '12 at 20:26
    
Thank you very much @James, I resolved it and it works perfectly now , thanks thanks thanks :) –  user1038031 Mar 6 '12 at 14:11
    
My guess would be that the view that uses Images is getting the contents of Images while this function is still putting bitmaps into Images. That would be OK, and the view could update as images were added, if Images was a ObservableCollection<>. –  Tristan Aug 9 '13 at 19:17

I think your problem will be this line.

FileRandomAccessStream stream = (FileRandomAccessStream)await storageFile.OpenAsync(FileAccessMode.Read);

Awaiting inside a loop is likely going to give you some odd scope issues.
The first thing I would try is switching the first two lines of this loop around.

FileRandomAccessStream stream = (FileRandomAccessStream)await storageFile.OpenAsync(FileAccessMode.Read);
BitmapImage bitmapImage = new BitmapImage();

It could be that the bitmapImage reference is being repointed on you. If this doesn't help though, you might need to look at the .ContinueWith method.

storageFile.OpenAsync(FileAccessMode.Read).ContinueWith(task => {
  FileRandomAccessStream stream = (FileRandomAccessStream)task.Result;
  BitmapImage bitmapImage = new BitmapImage();
  bitmapImage.SetSource(stream);
  Image image = new Image();
  image.Source = bitmapImage;
  Images.Add(image);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Hi @Chris , I tried to switch those two lines but it didn't work, even there is no definition for .ContinueWith() method. thanks for your help . –  user1038031 Mar 6 '12 at 11:53

Ok, I found the solution for this thanks to you guys , I had to rearrange the code little bit,

public async Task Initialize()
        {   
            IReadOnlyList<StorageFile> storageFiles = await KnownFolders.PicturesLibrary.GetFilesAsync();              
            foreach (var storageFile in storageFiles)
            {
                var image = new Image();
                image.Source = await GetBitmapImageAsync(storageFile);
                Images.Add(image);
            }
        }

        public async Task<BitmapImage> GetBitmapImageAsync(StorageFile storageFile)
        {
            BitmapImage bitmapImage = new BitmapImage();
            IAsyncOperation<IRandomAccessStream> operation = storageFile.OpenAsync(FileAccessMode.Read);
            IRandomAccessStream stream = await operation;
            bitmapImage.SetSource(stream);
            return bitmapImage;
        }

then call all that in the OnNavigateTo event since the constructor can't be async

 protected override async void OnNavigatedTo(NavigationEventArgs e)
        {
            _imageList = new ImagesList();
            await _imageList.Initialize();
            foreach (var image in _imageList.Images)
            {
                Image img = new Image() { Source = image.Source };
                img.Width = img.Height = 200;
                img.Margin = new Thickness(20, 0, 20, 0);
                img.ImageFailed += image_ImageFailed;
                img.PointerEntered += img_PointerEntered;
                img.PointerExited += img_PointerExited;
                sp_MainStackPanel.Children.Add(img);
            }
        }

thanks again guys !

share|improve this answer
    
FWIW, you could change the 'await _imageList.Initialize()' to '_imageList.Initialize().Wait()' and then the code could be put in the ctor (since it would be running synchronously at that point and not rewritten). If you're consuming an async API and don't want the caller to be async, just interacting with the returned Task normally (for instance, calling Wait()) is perfectly fine. You only need to 'await' when you want the caller to also be async :) –  James Manning Mar 6 '12 at 18:28

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