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I'm a beginner to the Win32 API, but I am intermediately experienced with C++. For learning purposes, I created, according to references, tutorials, and examples, a very simple Win32 application.

The problem is, after the main window is closed, its process still runs in the background. How can I prevent this? In my WndProc function, I do have a WM_DESTROY case with DestroyWindow, but it doesn't seem to be doing the trick. The code is below:

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>

#ifdef UNICODE
#include <tchar.h>
#endif

#include <Windows.h>

HINSTANCE hinst;
HWND hwnd;

LRESULT CALLBACK WndProc(HWND hwnd, UINT uMsg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam);

#ifdef UNICODE
int WINAPI _tWinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPTSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
#else
int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
#endif
{
    MSG msg;
    WNDCLASSEX mainclass;
    BOOL bRet;
    UNREFERENCED_PARAMETER(lpCmdLine);

    mainclass.cbSize =          sizeof(WNDCLASSEX);
    mainclass.style =           CS_VREDRAW | CS_HREDRAW;
    mainclass.lpfnWndProc =     (WNDPROC) WndProc;
    mainclass.cbClsExtra =      NULL;
    mainclass.cbWndExtra =      NULL;
    mainclass.hInstance =       hInstance;
    mainclass.hIcon =           NULL;
    mainclass.hCursor =         LoadCursor(NULL, IDC_ARROW);
    mainclass.hbrBackground =   (HBRUSH) COLOR_WINDOW;
    mainclass.lpszMenuName =    NULL;
    mainclass.lpszClassName =   TEXT("MainWindowClass");
    mainclass.hIconSm =         NULL;

    if (!RegisterClassEx(&mainclass))
        return FALSE;

    hinst = hInstance;

    hwnd = CreateWindowEx(
        WS_EX_WINDOWEDGE,
        TEXT("MainWindowClass"),
        TEXT("Test Window"),
        WS_CAPTION | WS_VISIBLE | WS_SIZEBOX | WS_SYSMENU | WS_MINIMIZEBOX | WS_MAXIMIZEBOX,
        CW_USEDEFAULT,
        CW_USEDEFAULT,
        CW_USEDEFAULT,
        CW_USEDEFAULT,
        NULL,
        NULL,
        hinst,
        NULL);

    ShowWindow(hwnd, nCmdShow);
    UpdateWindow(hwnd);

    while ((bRet = GetMessage(&msg, NULL, 0, 0)) != 0)
    {
        if (bRet != -1)
        {
            TranslateMessage(&msg);
            DispatchMessage(&msg);
        }
    }
    return (int) msg.wParam;
}

LRESULT CALLBACK WndProc(HWND hwnd, UINT uMsg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
{
    PAINTSTRUCT ps;
    switch(uMsg)
    {
    case WM_DESTROY:
        DestroyWindow(hwnd);
        break;
    case WM_PAINT:
        BeginPaint(hwnd, &ps);
        EndPaint(hwnd, &ps);
        break;
    default:
        return DefWindowProc(hwnd, uMsg, wParam, lParam);
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
You can use the debugger to help you. When you close the main window and your program is still running, pause execution and look at the call stack to find out what your program is still busy doing. That can give you clues about what your program is expecting you to do to make it stop running. For example, if you find that your program is still running the message loop, you could arrange for the loop's termination condition to be met. –  Rob Kennedy Mar 5 '12 at 18:14
    
Here is a better reference/tutorial/example: Raymond Chen's C++ scratch program. And here's a link to the C scratch program as well. –  Ben Voigt Mar 5 '12 at 19:24
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2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

DOn't call DestroyWindow the message is telling you that your window has already been destroyed, , call PostQuitMessage(0) to quit the application.

share|improve this answer
1  
Actually, you want WM_CLOSE to trigger DestroyWindow(hwnd). That might be the default though. –  Ben Voigt Mar 5 '12 at 17:52
    
Ah, thanks! I misunderstood the use of the WM_DESTROY message. PostQuitMessage(0) fixed it. –  Archimaredes Mar 5 '12 at 17:55
    
@BenVoigt It appears to be default. I didn't need to add that case in for an apparent automatic DestroyWindow. –  Archimaredes Mar 5 '12 at 17:56
    
I'd like to point out that DestroyWindow essentially calls WM_DESTROY, which in your case calls DestroyWindow again, etc.. –  Brandon Mar 5 '12 at 23:25
1  
For those new or unfamiliar with PostQuitMessage(), it is what places a WM_QUIT on your message queue which causes GetMessage() to return FALSE, thus terminating the while() loop of your main message pump. read more about it in the SDK docs shipped with Visual Studio. –  WhozCraig Sep 3 '12 at 21:23
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In your WndProc add a case for WM_CLOSE and call PostQuitMessage.

LRESULT CALLBACK WndProc(HWND hwnd, UINT uMsg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
{
  case WM_CLOSE:
  PostQuitMessage(0);
  break;
  // other cases
}

When user clicks close button (or from sys menu) Windows will post the WM_CLOSE message. This will cause your main Windows message handler to quit. This, in turn will ensure your application exits properly.

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