Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I imagine this pertains to Hibernate only (I'm just now beginning to use these two frameworks). I have an application that tracks sessions for users. While a session is active, the Session entity is stored in a table for active sessions. When the user goes offline and the session ends, the session is moved to a secondary historical table.

How do I achieve this with Hibernate? Right now I have a Session.hbm.xml file that maps a Session object to the active sessions table. Can I map it to a secondary table and somehow specify to which table I want it to persist when I call saveOrUpdate?

My reputation currently won't allow me to answer my own question this quickly. I don't want anyone to waste their time on this though, since I found an answer, so I'm posting it here as an edit.

I can do this by making use of the entity-name attribute in a mapping file. I created a second mapping, identical to Session.hbm.xml, called HistoricalSession.hbm.xml. In this new mapping file I reference the same Session class, but add:

entity-name="HistoricalSession"

Then I map the object to my second (historical) table just like normal. Calling save() or saveOrUpdate() defaults to using the classname as the entity-name, and saves in my primary table as before. Now, when I want to save a session to the historical table I use the Hibernate API overrides that allow you to specify an entity-name:

saveOrUpdate("HistoricalSession",session);

This accomplishes exactly what I want without need to create another Java class for historical sessions

share|improve this question
    
I've thought of making a HistoricalSession entity with identical attributes to a Session but mapped to the historical table. In this case I would create a HistoricalSession from a Session that I am closing, and then persist the HistoricalSession. This will work, but requires creating a new object, a cost that I would like to avoid. –  tdimmig Mar 5 '12 at 18:15
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I can do this by making use of the entity-name attribute in a mapping file. I created a second mapping, identical to Session.hbm.xml, called HistoricalSession.hbm.xml. In this new mapping file I reference the same Session class, but add:

entity-name="HistoricalSession"

Then I map the object to my second (historical) table just like normal. Calling save() or saveOrUpdate() defaults to using the classname as the entity-name, and saves in my primary table as before. Now, when I want to save a session to the historical table I use the Hibernate API overrides that allow you to specify an entity-name:

saveOrUpdate("HistoricalSession",session);

This accomplishes exactly what I want without need to create another Java class for historical sessions

share|improve this answer
add comment

A couple of way to do this could be:

  • Use a database trigger when the session gets expired the trrigger will move the row to the historical table.
  • You can create a HistoricalSession extends Session and then do a second mapping for HistoricalSession and write the code to delete from Session and insert into historical session.
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your need sounds like more of an audit like. Check project Hibernate Envers it might help solve your case in a better way.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't all the functionality ( and overhead ) of Envers. I don't need a history of changes to the Object. What I need is the Session object to be persisted to a different table, exactly as it would be persisted to the first table. This will only ever happen once for a Session, and then the record will never be touched again. When a session closes, it's moved to the historical table just so a GUI can show when users were online in the past etc etc. –  tdimmig Mar 5 '12 at 18:42
    
Actually its not that overhead at all, thats your view point :). Its your app you choose whats best..... –  gbagga Mar 5 '12 at 19:42
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.