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Im quite a beginner at SQL and I've been trying to workout for hours now what the problem is with this:

SELECT COUNT (DISTINCT c.BAND_ID)Number_of_bands, COUNT(DISTINCT c.COMP_ID)"Total_Competitions",g.NAME GENRE_TYPE
FROM ENTERED_COMPS ec,COMPETITIONS c,GENRE g
WHERE c.COMP_ID = ec.COMP_ID
AND g.GENRE_ID = c.GENRE_ID
AND c.BAND_ID = b.BAND_ID
GROUP BY GENRE_TYPE
ORDER BY GENRE_TYPE ASC;

Oracle just comes up with the error 
ORA-00904: "GENRE_TYPE": invalid identifier
00904. 00000 -  "%s: invalid identifier"
*Cause:    
*Action:
Error at Line: 6 Column: 9

Which makes me think there must be a problem with the GENRE.NAME column.... with the name being incorrect or misspelled. That is however not the case..

Im trying to get query to analyze the comparative popularity of genres by outputting them in alphabetical order and showing how many competitions of each genre are being held and how many bands have entered competitions of each genre.

To make this a little simpler here's a link to my ERD - http://www.missingstudios.com/matt/ERD%20Logical.pdf

Support would be much appreciated!

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Can you change it to GROUP BY g.NAME instead? –  Mike Christensen Mar 5 '12 at 18:32
    
Try using g.Name instead of GENRE_TYPE in both the GROUP BY and ORDER BY clauses. –  Michael Todd Mar 5 '12 at 18:33
    
And please stop using implicit join syntax. That is a very ppor programing technique. IMplicit joins are far less subject ot accidental cross joins are easier to maintain and far more likely to be correct. –  HLGEM Mar 5 '12 at 18:38
    
Using explicit joins, you are less likely to omit a table such as the one aliassed 'b' (presumably BAND) - as in c.BAND_ID = b.BAND_ID. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 5 '12 at 21:17
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3 Answers 3

Try leaving the alias in your group by and order by clause

SELECT COUNT (DISTINCT c.BAND_ID) Number_of_bands, 
       COUNT(DISTINCT c.COMP_ID) Total_Competitions, 
       g.NAME GENRE_TYPE
FROM ENTERED_COMPS ec,COMPETITIONS c,GENRE g
WHERE c.COMP_ID = ec.COMP_ID
AND g.GENRE_ID = c.GENRE_ID
AND c.BAND_ID = b.BAND_ID
GROUP BY g.NAME
ORDER BY g.NAME ASC;
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While I suspect your answer will work, I will downvote anything that uses the SQl Antipattern of an implicit join. We should not be encouraging poor programming techniques. –  HLGEM Mar 5 '12 at 18:39
2  
Some of us learned to write SQL before the ANSI join syntax was supported. Oracle 8i wasn't that long ago. –  Adam Musch Mar 6 '12 at 6:22
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The problem is that column aliases introduced in the select-list cannot be used in the GROUP BY and ORDER BY clauses. You also reference a table alias 'b' that doesn't appear in the FROM clause.

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT c.BAND_ID) Number_of_bands,
       COUNT(DISTINCT c.COMP_ID) "Total_Competitions",
       g.NAME GENRE_TYPE
  FROM ENTERED_COMPS ec
  JOIN COMPETITIONS  c  ON c.COMP_ID  = ec.COMP_ID
  JOIN GENRE         g  ON g.GENRE_ID = c.GENRE_ID
  JOIN BAND          b  ON c.BAND_ID  = b.BAND_ID
 GROUP BY g.NAME
 ORDER BY g.NAME ASC;

Some variants of SQL allow the use of the aliases in the ORDER BY clause; some may allow them more generally. It is a source of confusion. (Some DBMS follow the SQL standard and allow AS between table names and aliases; Oracle does not.)

Please discuss with your tutor why you've been taught the archaic implicit join notation; you should only learn it in order to understand old SQL that you are not changing, not in order to write new SQL. You should always use the explicit join notation (as shown above) in new SQL statements.

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Assuming your ERD is accurate, the error message is exactly correct. GENRE_TYPE is an invalid identifier. It isn't in your ERD.

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Thank You for your support much appreciated. Had another look at this entire code and i have found a number of problems which i must previously had ignored including some of the tables in the FROM statement. Looks like ill learn from this for the future! –  Matt Kidd Mar 5 '12 at 18:50
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