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Take these two classes for example. (C++)

class B1 {
public:

};

class B2 {
public:
  void f0 () {}
  void f1 () {}
};

How much bigger would class B2 be in memory vs B1

I feel like it's one of two answers.

a single 4 byte int pointer on 32 bit systems PER method.

Or something similar to what happens with Virtual Method Tables http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_method_table

where there would be one 4 byte int pointer that points to a table for each class so it can look up it's methods, which would make sense, but I don't know if this happens for non-virtual methods.

Thanks.

Edit : Thanks for all of the awesome and quick replies :) (Also marked answer)

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1  
A simple trick: Test it in your compiler and see if you can falsify your hypothesis. –  Kerrek SB Mar 5 '12 at 19:10
1  
Note that even if you try it and your this does not falsify you're hypothesis, it doesn't mean your hypothesis is valid. –  André Caron Mar 5 '12 at 19:16
    
possible duplicate of In C++, where in memory are class functions put? (with credit to @Sid for finding it) –  Ben Voigt Mar 5 '12 at 19:28
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

None.

Non-virtual methods don't increase a class's size.

As for virtual methods, only the first one added to a class will increase its size, all subsequent ones do not.

The fact that it's inline or not also doesn't affect the class size.

The reason for this is that extra memory is not needed. Just imagine if all instances of all classes held pointers to all methods in the class and all parent classes. That would be a huge waste of memory.

B2 b;
b.f0();

the compiler can simply generate code to call B2::f0(). The this pointer is passed as an under-the-hood parameter so that the method know on which instance of the class to operate.

For a simple test:

class B1 {
public:

};

class B2 {
public:
  void f0 () {}
  void f1 () {}
};

//...
assert( sizeof(B1) == sizeof(B2) );
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How would you prove this is true in C++ and why is this the case? –  mmacdermaid Mar 5 '12 at 19:14
1  
@mmacdermaid I already explained why this is the case: 1) there's no need for it, as the methods need no dynamic binding (like in the case of virtual methods) 2) huge memory waste. As for proving it, you can compare the size of your 2 classes. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 5 '12 at 19:16
    
Add a method and use sizeof to calculate before and after size. –  Sid Mar 5 '12 at 19:16
    
I caught your reply before you edited. Thanks for the update. –  mmacdermaid Mar 5 '12 at 19:16
1  
@mmacdermaid: I'm not sure the behavior is actually required by the standard, since it's (reportedly) possible to implement a C++ interpreter. However, in all practical implementations (and therefore, all popular compilers), the method address is hard-coded by the compiler at compile time and never needs to be looked-up/accessed/computed at run-time, so there is no need to store a pointer to look up the address. –  André Caron Mar 5 '12 at 19:19
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Luchian's answer is correct. I just want to add that code is kept on the text segment which is different from where the data resides (data segment). Hence, the only time methods affect an object's size is when their is a virtual method hence forcing a vptr to be placed inside the object. Read this to get more enlightened on the segments part: In C++, where in memory are class functions put?

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Thanks. I will give that a read. –  mmacdermaid Mar 5 '12 at 19:22
1  
Since this is not an answer, I suggest you make this a comment. Nice link, BTW! –  André Caron Mar 5 '12 at 19:28
    
That's a good reference, which appears to cover this question completely enough to mark this one as a dupe. –  Ben Voigt Mar 5 '12 at 19:28
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