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Let's say we have 0.33, we need to output "1/3".
If we have "0.4", we need to output "2/5".

The idea is to make it human-readable to make the user understand "x parts out of y" as a better way of understanding data.

I know that percentages is a good substitute but I was wondering if there was a simple way to do this?

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You need to state what language you are attempting to do this in to draw helpful answers. –  Kit Roed Sep 18 '08 at 19:02
1  
Any language is fine, Python is preferable. –  Swaroop C H Sep 18 '08 at 19:03
2  
There isn't a general solution, so probably not homework. –  Guvante Sep 18 '08 at 19:07
5  
I like this language-independent question –  jmfsg Sep 18 '08 at 19:23
1  
I can't say I like the statement of the problem. The title asks us to convert "floats", but the text offers string representations of decimal fractions. If we take "float" to be a internal representation like IEEE 754, then these are two different problems. Good answer for both, however. –  dmckee Sep 17 '11 at 19:41

26 Answers 26

up vote 48 down vote accepted

I have found David Eppstein's find rational approximation to given real number C code to be exactly what you are asking for. Its based on the theory of continued fractions and very fast and fairly compact.

I have used versions of this customized for specific numerator and denominator limits.

/*
** find rational approximation to given real number
** David Eppstein / UC Irvine / 8 Aug 1993
**
** With corrections from Arno Formella, May 2008
**
** usage: a.out r d
**   r is real number to approx
**   d is the maximum denominator allowed
**
** based on the theory of continued fractions
** if x = a1 + 1/(a2 + 1/(a3 + 1/(a4 + ...)))
** then best approximation is found by truncating this series
** (with some adjustments in the last term).
**
** Note the fraction can be recovered as the first column of the matrix
**  ( a1 1 ) ( a2 1 ) ( a3 1 ) ...
**  ( 1  0 ) ( 1  0 ) ( 1  0 )
** Instead of keeping the sequence of continued fraction terms,
** we just keep the last partial product of these matrices.
*/

#include <stdio.h>

main(ac, av)
int ac;
char ** av;
{
    double atof();
    int atoi();
    void exit();

    long m[2][2];
    double x, startx;
    long maxden;
    long ai;

    /* read command line arguments */
    if (ac != 3) {
        fprintf(stderr, "usage: %s r d\n",av[0]);  // AF: argument missing
        exit(1);
    }
    startx = x = atof(av[1]);
    maxden = atoi(av[2]);

    /* initialize matrix */
    m[0][0] = m[1][1] = 1;
    m[0][1] = m[1][0] = 0;

    /* loop finding terms until denom gets too big */
    while (m[1][0] *  ( ai = (long)x ) + m[1][1] <= maxden) {
        long t;
        t = m[0][0] * ai + m[0][1];
        m[0][1] = m[0][0];
        m[0][0] = t;
        t = m[1][0] * ai + m[1][1];
        m[1][1] = m[1][0];
        m[1][0] = t;
        if(x==(double)ai) break;     // AF: division by zero
        x = 1/(x - (double) ai);
        if(x>(double)0x7FFFFFFF) break;  // AF: representation failure
    } 

    /* now remaining x is between 0 and 1/ai */
    /* approx as either 0 or 1/m where m is max that will fit in maxden */
    /* first try zero */
    printf("%ld/%ld, error = %e\n", m[0][0], m[1][0],
           startx - ((double) m[0][0] / (double) m[1][0]));

    /* now try other possibility */
    ai = (maxden - m[1][1]) / m[1][0];
    m[0][0] = m[0][0] * ai + m[0][1];
    m[1][0] = m[1][0] * ai + m[1][1];
    printf("%ld/%ld, error = %e\n", m[0][0], m[1][0],
           startx - ((double) m[0][0] / (double) m[1][0]));
}
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3  
For those of you looking for a solution in Ruby, we're in luck! Christopher Lord has implemented the above algorithm in a Ruby gem. See christopher.lord.ac/fractions-in-ruby and rubygems.org/gems/fraction –  shedd Jan 26 '11 at 9:14
3  
Be aware that there are some edge cases that this code does not handle very welll: when given -1.3333333 with a maximum denominator of 4 it returns 4/-3 with an error of 3.333333e-08 and -5/4 with an error = -8.333330e-02, which is correct. But when given -1.33333337 with the same maximum denominator, it turns 12121211/-9090908 with an error of error = 4.218847e-15 and -4/3 with an error of -3.666667e-08, which is not correct. This is an issue in particular when presenting the algorithm with computed floating point numbers such as -4/3, which yields incorrect results like these. –  edsko Aug 1 '11 at 8:26

From Python 2.6 on there is the fractions module.

(Quoting from the docs.)

>>> from fractions import Fraction
>>> Fraction('3.1415926535897932').limit_denominator(1000)
Fraction(355, 113)

>>> from math import pi, cos
>>> Fraction.from_float(cos(pi/3))
Fraction(4503599627370497, 9007199254740992)
>>> Fraction.from_float(cos(pi/3)).limit_denominator()
Fraction(1, 2)
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3  
Implementation and algorithm notes at hg.python.org/cpython/file/822c7c0d27d1/Lib/fractions.py#l211 –  piro Mar 28 '11 at 10:44

Here's a link explaining the math behind converting a decimal to a fraction:

http://www.webmath.com/dec2fract.html

And here's an example function for how to actually do it using VB (from www.freevbcode.com/ShowCode.asp?ID=582):

Public Function Dec2Frac(ByVal f As Double) As String

   Dim df As Double
   Dim lUpperPart As Long
   Dim lLowerPart As Long

   lUpperPart = 1
   lLowerPart = 1

   df = lUpperPart / lLowerPart
   While (df <> f)
      If (df < f) Then
         lUpperPart = lUpperPart + 1
      Else
         lLowerPart = lLowerPart + 1
         lUpperPart = f * lLowerPart
      End If
      df = lUpperPart / lLowerPart
   Wend
Dec2Frac = CStr(lUpperPart) & "/" & CStr(lLowerPart)
End Function

(From google searches: convert decimal to fraction, convert decimal to fraction code)

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If the the output is to give a human reader a fast impression of the order of the result, it makes no sense return something like "113/211", so the output should limit itself to using one-digit numbers (and maybe 1/10 and 9/10). If so, you can observe that there are only 27 different fractions.

Since the underlying math for generating the output will never change, a solution could be to simply hard-code a binary search tree, so that the function would perform at most log(27) ~= 4 3/4 comparisons. Here is a tested C version of the code

char *userTextForDouble(double d, char *rval)
{
    if (d == 0.0)
        return "0";

    // TODO: negative numbers:if (d < 0.0)...
    if (d >= 1.0)
        sprintf(rval, "%.0f ", floor(d));
    d = d-floor(d); // now only the fractional part is left

    if (d == 0.0)
        return rval;

    if( d < 0.47 )
    {
        if( d < 0.25 )
        {
            if( d < 0.16 )
            {
                if( d < 0.12 ) // Note: fixed from .13
                {
                    if( d < 0.11 )
                        strcat(rval, "1/10"); // .1
                    else
                        strcat(rval, "1/9"); // .1111....
                }
                else // d >= .12
                {
                    if( d < 0.14 )
                        strcat(rval, "1/8"); // .125
                    else
                        strcat(rval, "1/7"); // .1428...
                }
            }
            else // d >= .16
            {
                if( d < 0.19 )
                {
                    strcat(rval, "1/6"); // .1666...
                }
                else // d > .19
                {
                    if( d < 0.22 )
                        strcat(rval, "1/5"); // .2
                    else
                        strcat(rval, "2/9"); // .2222...
                }
            }
        }
        else // d >= .25
        {
            if( d < 0.37 ) // Note: fixed from .38
            {
                if( d < 0.28 ) // Note: fixed from .29
                {
                    strcat(rval, "1/4"); // .25
                }
                else // d >=.28
                {
                    if( d < 0.31 )
                        strcat(rval, "2/7"); // .2857...
                    else
                        strcat(rval, "1/3"); // .3333...
                }
            }
            else // d >= .37
            {
                if( d < 0.42 ) // Note: fixed from .43
                {
                    if( d < 0.40 )
                        strcat(rval, "3/8"); // .375
                    else
                        strcat(rval, "2/5"); // .4
                }
                else // d >= .42
                {
                    if( d < 0.44 )
                        strcat(rval, "3/7"); // .4285...
                    else
                        strcat(rval, "4/9"); // .4444...
                }
            }
        }
    }
    else
    {
        if( d < 0.71 )
        {
            if( d < 0.60 )
            {
                if( d < 0.55 ) // Note: fixed from .56
                {
                    strcat(rval, "1/2"); // .5
                }
                else // d >= .55
                {
                    if( d < 0.57 )
                        strcat(rval, "5/9"); // .5555...
                    else
                        strcat(rval, "4/7"); // .5714
                }
            }
            else // d >= .6
            {
                if( d < 0.62 ) // Note: Fixed from .63
                {
                    strcat(rval, "3/5"); // .6
                }
                else // d >= .62
                {
                    if( d < 0.66 )
                        strcat(rval, "5/8"); // .625
                    else
                        strcat(rval, "2/3"); // .6666...
                }
            }
        }
        else
        {
            if( d < 0.80 )
            {
                if( d < 0.74 )
                {
                    strcat(rval, "5/7"); // .7142...
                }
                else // d >= .74
                {
                    if(d < 0.77 ) // Note: fixed from .78
                        strcat(rval, "3/4"); // .75
                    else
                        strcat(rval, "7/9"); // .7777...
                }
            }
            else // d >= .8
            {
                if( d < 0.85 ) // Note: fixed from .86
                {
                    if( d < 0.83 )
                        strcat(rval, "4/5"); // .8
                    else
                        strcat(rval, "5/6"); // .8333...
                }
                else // d >= .85
                {
                    if( d < 0.87 ) // Note: fixed from .88
                    {
                        strcat(rval, "6/7"); // .8571
                    }
                    else // d >= .87
                    {
                        if( d < 0.88 ) // Note: fixed from .89
                        {
                            strcat(rval, "7/8"); // .875
                        }
                        else // d >= .88
                        {
                            if( d < 0.90 )
                                strcat(rval, "8/9"); // .8888...
                            else
                                strcat(rval, "9/10"); // .9
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return rval;
}
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1  
This is the kind of lateral thinking we need more of! Excellent suggestion. –  edsko Aug 1 '11 at 8:40
    
Its a bit ugly but very fast and practical way –  Bosak Nov 11 '12 at 17:10
    
This is an interesting approach that's wonderfully simple. To save space you could instead binary search an array, or create a binary tree, but your approach is probably a little faster (you could save space by using a single call to strcat before return and assign a var where it's now called) . Also I would have included 3/10 and 7/10, but maybe that's just me. –  jimhark Jan 20 '13 at 5:43
    
Inspired by this solution, I've created a short (but totally unoptimized) code. It can easily be extended to cover a larger range of fractions. jsfiddle.net/PdL23/1 –  Deepak Joy Dec 9 '13 at 10:41

You might want to read What Every Computer Scientist Should Know about Floating Point Arithmetic.

You'll have to specify some precision by multiplying by a large number:

3.141592 * 1000000 = 3141592

then you can make a fraction:

3 + (141592 / 1000000)

and reduce via GCD...

3 + (17699 / 125000)

but there is no way to get the intended fraction out. You might want to always use fractions throughout your code instead --just remember to reduce fractions when you can to avoid overflow!

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Here are Perl and Javascript versions of the VB code suggested by devinmoore:

Perl:

sub dec2frac {
    my $d = shift;

    my $df  = 1;
    my $top = 1;
    my $bot = 1;

    while ($df != $d) {
      if ($df < $d) {
        $top += 1;
      }
      else {
         $bot += 1;
         $top = int($d * $bot);
      }
      $df = $top / $bot;
   }
   return "$top/$bot";
}

And the almost identical javascript:

function dec2frac(d) {

    var df = 1;
    var top = 1;
    var bot = 1;

    while (df != d) {
        if (df < d) {
            top += 1;
        }
        else {
            bot += 1;
            top = parseInt(d * bot);
        }
        df = top / bot;
    }
    return top + '/' + bot;
}
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The Stern-Brocot Tree induces a fairly natural way to approximate real numbers by fractions with simple denominators.

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Part of the problem is that so many fractions aren't actually easily construed as fractions. E.g. 0.33 isn't 1/3, it's 33/100. But if you remember your elementary school training, then there is a process of converting decimal values into fractions, however it's unlikely to give you what you want since most of the time decimal numbers aren't stored at 0.33, but 0.329999999999998 or some such.

Do yourself a favor and don't bother with this, but if you need to then you can do the following:

Multiply the original value by 10 until you remove the fractional part. Keep that number, and use it as the divisor. Then do a series of simplifications by looking for common denominators.

So 0.4 would be 4/10. You would then look for common divisors starting with low values, probably prime numbers. Starting with 2, you would see if 2 divides both the numerator and denominator evenly by checking if the floor of division is the same as the division itself.

floor(5/2) = 2
5/2 = 2.5

So 5 does not divide 2 evenly. So then you check the next number, say 3. You do this until you hit at or above the square root of the smaller number.

After you do that then you need

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"then you need" ...........? –  Joe Philllips Apr 27 '09 at 19:05
1  
I'd suggest using the euclidean algorithm for that last step –  Graphics Noob Aug 25 '09 at 22:52

A C# implementation

/// <summary>
/// Represents a rational number
/// </summary>
public struct Fraction
{
    public int Numerator;
    public int Denominator;

    /// <summary>
    /// Constructor
    /// </summary>
    public Fraction(int numerator, int denominator)
    {
        this.Numerator = numerator;
        this.Denominator = denominator;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Approximates a fraction from the provided double
    /// </summary>
    public static Fraction Parse(double d)
    {
        return ApproximateFraction(d);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns this fraction expressed as a double, rounded to the specified number of decimal places.
    /// Returns double.NaN if denominator is zero
    /// </summary>
    public double ToDouble(int decimalPlaces)
    {
        if (this.Denominator == 0)
            return double.NaN;

        return System.Math.Round(
            Numerator / (double)Denominator,
            decimalPlaces
        );
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Approximates the provided value to a fraction.
    /// http://stackoverflow.com/questions/95727/how-to-convert-floats-to-human-readable-fractions
    /// </summary>
    private static Fraction ApproximateFraction(double value)
    {
        const double EPSILON = .000001d;

        int n = 1;  // numerator
        int d = 1;  // denominator
        double fraction = n / d;

        while (System.Math.Abs(fraction - value) > EPSILON)
        {
            if (fraction < value)
            {
                n++;
            }
            else
            {
                d++;
                n = (int)System.Math.Round(value * d);
            }

            fraction = n / (double)d;
        }

        return new Fraction(n, d);
    }
}
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"Let's say we have 0.33, we need to output "1/3". "

What precision do you expect the "solution" to have? 0.33 is not equal to 1/3. How do you recognize a "good" (easy to read) answer?

No matter what, a possible algorithm could be:

If you expect to find a nearest fraction in a form X/Y where Y is less then 10, then you can loop though all 9 possible Ys, for each Y compute X, and then select the most accurate one.

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You'll have to figure out what level of error you're willing to accept. Not all decimal fractions will reduce to a simple fraction. I'd probably pick an easily-divisible number, like 60, and figure out how many 60ths is closest to the value, then simplify the fraction.

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You can do this in any programming language using the following steps:

  1. Multiply and Divide by 10^x where x is the power of 10 required to make sure that the number has no decimal places remaining. Example: Multiply 0.33 by 10^2 = 100 to make it 33 and divide it by the same to get 33/100
  2. Reduce the numerator and the denominator of the resulting fraction by factorization, till you can no longer obtain integers from the result.
  3. The resulting reduced fraction should be your answer.

Example: 0.2 =0.2 x 10^1/10^1 =2/10 =1/5

So, that can be read as '1 part out of 5'

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You can check Chapter 5.2 of Numerical Recipes in C, which shows three algorithms for solving your problem, with even a modification to the third to make it more stable.

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I think the best way to do this is to first convert your float value to an ascii representation. In C++ you could use ostringstream or in C, you could use sprintf. Here's how it would look in C++:

ostringstream oss;
float num;
cin >> num;
oss << num;
string numStr = oss.str();
int i = numStr.length(), pow_ten = 0;
while (i > 0) {
    if (numStr[i] == '.')
        break;
    pow_ten++;
    i--;
}
for (int j = 1; j < pow_ten; j++) {
    num *= 10.0;
}
cout << static_cast<int>(num) << "/" << pow(10, pow_ten - 1) << endl;

A similar approach could be taken in straight C.

Afterwards you would need to check that the fraction is in lowest terms. This algorithm will give a precise answer, i.e. 0.33 would output "33/100", not "1/3." However, 0.4 would give "4/10," which when reduced to lowest terms would be "2/5." This may not be as powerful as EppStein's solution, but I believe this is more straightforward.

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This is not an "algorithm", just a Python solution: http://docs.python.org/library/fractions.html

>>> from fractions import Fraction
>>> Fraction('3.1415926535897932').limit_denominator(1000)
Fraction(355, 113)
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A built-in solution in R:

library(MASS)
fractions(0.666666666)
## [1] 2/3

This uses a continued fraction method and has optional cycles and max.denominator arguments for adjusting the precision.

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You are going to have two basic problems that will make this hard:

1) Floating point isn't an exact representation which means that if you have a fraction of "x/y" which results in a value of "z", your fraction algorithm may return a result other than "x/y".

2) There are infinity many more irrational numbers than rational. A rational number is one that can be represented as a fraction. Irrational being ones that can not.

However, in a cheap sort of way, since floating point has limit accuracy, then you can always represent it as some form of faction. (I think...)

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3  
A float (or double) is a fraction. Its denominator is a power of 2. That's why they can't exactly represent some rational numbers. –  erickson Sep 18 '08 at 20:35

I have no idea of the actual algorithm, but this pointer http://edoshin.skeletonkey.com/2006/01/fraction_approx.html could be of some help.

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One solution is to just store all numbers as rational numbers in the first place. There are libraries for rational number arithmetic (eg GMP). If using an OO language you may be able to just use a rational number class library to replace your number class.

Finance programs, among others, would use such a solution to be able to make exact calculations and preserve precision that may be lost using a plain float.

Of course it will be a lot slower so it may not be practical for you. Depends on how much calculations you need to do, and how important the precision is for you.

a = rational(1);
b = rational(3);
c = a / b;

print (c.asFraction)  --->  "1/3"
print (c.asFloat) ----> "0.333333"
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Completed the above code and converted it to as3

public static function toFrac(f:Number) : String
    {
        if (f>1)
        {
            var parte1:int;
            var parte2:Number;
            var resultado:String;
            var loc:int = String(f).indexOf(".");
            parte2 = Number(String(f).slice(loc, String(f).length));
            parte1 = int(String(f).slice(0,loc));
            resultado = toFrac(parte2);
            parte1 *= int(resultado.slice(resultado.indexOf("/") + 1, resultado.length)) + int(resultado.slice(0, resultado.indexOf("/")));
            resultado = String(parte1) +  resultado.slice(resultado.indexOf("/"), resultado.length)
            return resultado;
        }
        if( f < 0.47 )
            if( f < 0.25 )
                if( f < 0.16 )
                    if( f < 0.13 )
                        if( f < 0.11 )
                            return "1/10";
                        else
                            return "1/9";
                    else
                        if( f < 0.14 )
                            return "1/8";
                        else
                            return "1/7";
                else
                    if( f < 0.19 )
                        return "1/6";
                    else
                        if( f < 0.22 )
                            return "1/5";
                        else
                            return "2/9";
            else
                if( f < 0.38 )
                    if( f < 0.29 )
                        return "1/4";
                    else
                        if( f < 0.31 )
                            return "2/7";
                        else
                            return "1/3";
                else
                    if( f < 0.43 )
                        if( f < 0.40 )
                            return "3/8";
                        else
                            return "2/5";
                    else
                        if( f < 0.44 )
                            return "3/7";
                        else
                            return "4/9";
        else
            if( f < 0.71 )
                if( f < 0.60 )
                    if( f < 0.56 )
                        return "1/2";
                    else
                        if( f < 0.57 )
                            return "5/9";
                        else
                            return "4/7";
                else
                    if( f < 0.63 )
                        return "3/5";
                    else
                        if( f < 0.66 )
                            return "5/8";
                        else
                            return "2/3";
            else
                if( f < 0.80 )
                    if( f < 0.74 )
                        return "5/7";
                    else
                        if(f < 0.78 )
                            return "3/4";
                        else
                            return "7/9";
                else
                    if( f < 0.86 )
                        if( f < 0.83 )
                            return "4/5";
                        else
                            return "5/6";
                    else
                        if( f < 0.88 )
                            return "6/7";
                        else
                            if( f < 0.89 )
                                return "7/8";
                            else
                                if( f < 0.90 )
                                    return "8/9";
                                else
                                    return "9/10";
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I used this for Delphi, easier to port than all that curly stuff –  Peter Turner Sep 26 '12 at 17:02

Ruby already has a built in solution:

0.33.rationalize.to_s # => "33/100"
0.4.rationalize.to_s # => "2/5"

In Rails, ActiveRecord numerical attributes can be converted too:

product.size = 0.33
product.size.to_r.to_s # => "33/100"
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Answer in C++, assuming that you have a 'BigInt' class, which can store unlimited-size integers.

You can use 'unsigned long long' instead, but it will only work for certain values.

void GetRational(double val)
{
    if (val == val+1) // Inf
        throw "Infinite Value";
    if (val != val) // NaN
        throw "Undefined Value";

    bool sign = false;
    BigInt enumerator = 0;
    BigInt denominator = 1;

    if (val < 0)
    {
        val = -val;
        sign = true;
    }

    while (val > 0)
    {
        unsigned int intVal = (unsigned int)val;
        val -= intVal;
        enumerator += intVal;
        val *= 2;
        enumerator *= 2;
        denominator *= 2;
    }

    BigInt gcd = GCD(enumerator,denominator);
    enumerator /= gcd;
    denominator /= gcd;

    Print(sign? "-":"+");
    Print(enumerator);
    Print("/");
    Print(denominator);

    // Or simply return {sign,enumerator,denominator} as you wish
}

BTW, GetRational(0.0) will return "+0/1", so you might wanna handle this case separately.

P.S.: I've been using this code in my own 'RationalNum' class for several years, and it's been tested thoroughly.

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Your example seems to break down on values like 1.333333.. it goes into a very long loop trying to find the value and does not seem to work... does fine with other simple values such as 1.25 –  Adamski May 31 at 23:01
    
@Adamski: Thanks. The "convergence" period of the while loop is bounded by the size of double, which is typically 64 bits. So it does not depend on the initial value of the input (val). The GCD function, however, does depend on this value, although it usually converges to a solution pretty quick. Is it possible that you did not implement this function properly? –  barak manos Jun 1 at 7:20
    
@Adamski: In addition, as I mentioned at the beginning of the answer, if you're using unsigned long long instead of BigInt, then it will not necessarily yield the correct result for every input value... But even under that scenario, the code is not supposed to "go into a very long loop". –  barak manos Jun 1 at 7:24
    
Ah ok yes, that is totally possible, the GCD function I was using is part of the Juce library BigInteger class. Thanks for the information! –  Adamski Jun 1 at 9:24
    
@Adamski: So it doesn't make sense that the GCD function is not implemented properly. Have you checked if the code runs for a long time during the while loop or after it? I will check the value of 1.33333, to see what's behind this. Thanks. –  barak manos Jun 1 at 9:47

As many people have stated you really can't convert a floating point back to a fraction (unless its extremely exact like .25). Of course you could create some type of look up for a large array of fractions and use some sort of fuzzy logic to produce the result you are looking for. Again this wouldn't be exact though and you would need to define a lower bounds of how large your want the denominator to go.

.32 < x < .34 = 1/3 or something like that.

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Here is implementation for ruby http://github.com/valodzka/frac

Math.frac(0.2, 100)  # => (1/5)
Math.frac(0.33, 10)  # => (1/3)
Math.frac(0.33, 100) # => (33/100)
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Let's say we have 0.33, we need to output "1/3". If we have "0.4", we need to output "2/5".

It's wrong in common case, because of 1/3 = 0.3333333 = 0.(3) Moreover, it's impossible to find out from suggested above solutions is decimal can be converted to fraction with defined precision, because output is always fraction.

BUT, i suggest my comprehensive function with many options based on idea of Infinite geometric series, specifically on formula:

enter image description here

At first this function is trying to find period of fraction in string representation. After that described above formula is applied.

Rational numbers code is borrowed from Stephen M. McKamey rational numbers implementation in C#. I hope there is not very hard to port my code on other languages.

/// <summary>
/// Convert decimal to fraction
/// </summary>
/// <param name="value">decimal value to convert</param>
/// <param name="result">result fraction if conversation is succsess</param>
/// <param name="decimalPlaces">precision of considereation frac part of value</param>
/// <param name="trimZeroes">trim zeroes on the right part of the value or not</param>
/// <param name="minPeriodRepeat">minimum period repeating</param>
/// <param name="digitsForReal">precision for determination value to real if period has not been founded</param>
/// <returns></returns>
public static bool FromDecimal(decimal value, out Rational<T> result, 
    int decimalPlaces = 28, bool trimZeroes = false, decimal minPeriodRepeat = 2, int digitsForReal = 9)
{
    var valueStr = value.ToString("0.0000000000000000000000000000", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
    var strs = valueStr.Split('.');

    long intPart = long.Parse(strs[0]);
    string fracPartTrimEnd = strs[1].TrimEnd(new char[] { '0' });
    string fracPart;

    if (trimZeroes)
    {
        fracPart = fracPartTrimEnd;
        decimalPlaces = Math.Min(decimalPlaces, fracPart.Length);
    }
    else
        fracPart = strs[1];

    result = new Rational<T>();
    try
    {
        string periodPart;
        bool periodFound = false;

        int i;
        for (i = 0; i < fracPart.Length; i++)
        {
            if (fracPart[i] == '0' && i != 0)
                continue;

            for (int j = i + 1; j < fracPart.Length; j++)
            {
                periodPart = fracPart.Substring(i, j - i);
                periodFound = true;
                decimal periodRepeat = 1;
                decimal periodStep = 1.0m / periodPart.Length;
                var upperBound = Math.Min(fracPart.Length, decimalPlaces);
                int k;
                for (k = i + periodPart.Length; k < upperBound; k += 1)
                {
                    if (periodPart[(k - i) % periodPart.Length] != fracPart[k])
                    {
                        periodFound = false;
                        break;
                    }
                    periodRepeat += periodStep;
                }

                if (!periodFound && upperBound - k <= periodPart.Length && periodPart[(upperBound - i) % periodPart.Length] > '5')
                {
                    var ind = (k - i) % periodPart.Length;
                    var regroupedPeriod = (periodPart.Substring(ind) + periodPart.Remove(ind)).Substring(0, upperBound - k);
                    ulong periodTailPlusOne = ulong.Parse(regroupedPeriod) + 1;
                    ulong fracTail = ulong.Parse(fracPart.Substring(k, regroupedPeriod.Length));
                    if (periodTailPlusOne == fracTail)
                        periodFound = true;
                }

                if (periodFound && periodRepeat >= minPeriodRepeat)
                {
                    result = FromDecimal(strs[0], fracPart.Substring(0, i), periodPart);
                    break;
                }
                else
                    periodFound = false;
            }

            if (periodFound)
                break;
        }

        if (!periodFound)
        {
            if (fracPartTrimEnd.Length >= digitsForReal)
                return false;
            else
            {
                result = new Rational<T>(long.Parse(strs[0]), 1, false);
                if (fracPartTrimEnd.Length != 0)
                    result = new Rational<T>(ulong.Parse(fracPartTrimEnd), TenInPower(fracPartTrimEnd.Length));
                return true;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }
    catch
    {
        return false;
    }
}

public static Rational<T> FromDecimal(string intPart, string fracPart, string periodPart)
{
    Rational<T> firstFracPart;
    if (fracPart != null && fracPart.Length != 0)
    {
        ulong denominator = TenInPower(fracPart.Length);
        firstFracPart = new Rational<T>(ulong.Parse(fracPart), denominator);
    }
    else
        firstFracPart = new Rational<T>(0, 1, false);

    Rational<T> secondFracPart;
    if (periodPart != null && periodPart.Length != 0)
        secondFracPart =
            new Rational<T>(ulong.Parse(periodPart), TenInPower(fracPart.Length)) *
            new Rational<T>(1, Nines((ulong)periodPart.Length), false);
    else
        secondFracPart = new Rational<T>(0, 1, false);

    var result = firstFracPart + secondFracPart;
    if (intPart != null && intPart.Length != 0)
    {
        long intPartLong = long.Parse(intPart);
        result = new Rational<T>(intPartLong, 1, false) + (intPartLong == 0 ? 1 : Math.Sign(intPartLong)) * result;
    }

    return result;
}

private static ulong TenInPower(int power)
{
    ulong result = 1;
    for (int l = 0; l < power; l++)
        result *= 10;
    return result;
}

private static decimal TenInNegPower(int power)
{
    decimal result = 1;
    for (int l = 0; l > power; l--)
        result /= 10.0m;
    return result;
}

private static ulong Nines(ulong power)
{
    ulong result = 9;
    if (power >= 0)
        for (ulong l = 0; l < power - 1; l++)
            result = result * 10 + 9;
    return result;
}

There are some examples of usings:

Rational<long>.FromDecimal(0.33333333m, out r, 8, false);
// then r == 1 / 3;

Rational<long>.FromDecimal(0.33333333m, out r, 9, false);
// then r == 33333333 / 100000000;

Your case with right part zero part trimming:

Rational<long>.FromDecimal(0.33m, out r, 28, true);
// then r == 1 / 3;

Rational<long>.FromDecimal(0.33m, out r, 28, true);
// then r == 33 / 100;

Min period demostration:

Rational<long>.FromDecimal(0.123412m, out r, 28, true, 1.5m));
// then r == 1234 / 9999;
Rational<long>.FromDecimal(0.123412m, out r, 28, true, 1.6m));
// then r == 123412 / 1000000; because of minimu repeating of period is 0.1234123 in this case.

Rounding at the end:

Rational<long>.FromDecimal(0.8888888888888888888888888889m, out r));
// then r == 8 == 9;

The most interesting case:

Rational<long>.FromDecimal(0.12345678m, out r, 28, true, 2, 9);
// then r == 12345678 / 100000000;

Rational<long>.FromDecimal(0.12345678m, out r, 28, true, 2, 8);
// Conversation failed, because of period has not been founded and there are too many digits in fraction part of input value.

Rational<long>.FromDecimal(0.12121212121212121m, out r, 28, true, 2, 9));
// then r == 4 / 33; Despite of too many digits in input value, period has been founded. Thus it's possible to convert value to fraction.

Other tests and code everyone can find in my MathFunctions library on github.

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Here is a quick and dirty implementation in javascript that uses a brute force approach. Not at all optimized, it works within a predefined range of fractions: http://jsfiddle.net/PdL23/1/

/* This should convert any decimals to a simplified fraction within the range specified by the two for loops. Haven't done any thorough testing, but it seems to work fine.

I have set the bounds for numerator and denominator to 20, 20... but you can increase this if you want in the two for loops.

Disclaimer: Its not at all optimized. (Feel free to create an improved version.)
*/

decimalToSimplifiedFraction = function(n) {

    for(num = 1; num < 20; num++) {  // "num" is the potential numerator
        for(den = 1; den < 20; den++) {  // "den" is the potential denominator
            var multiplyByInverse = (n * den ) / num;

            var roundingError = Math.round(multiplyByInverse) - multiplyByInverse;

            // Checking if we have found the inverse of the number, 
            if((Math.round(multiplyByInverse) == 1) && (Math.abs(roundingError) < 0.01)) {
                return num + "/" + den;
            }
        }
    }
};

//Put in your test number here.
var floatNumber = 2.56;

alert(floatNumber + " = " + decimalToSimplifiedFraction(floatNumber));

This is inspired by the approach used by JPS.

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protected by devnull Mar 9 at 13:16

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