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I want to check code inside math library function sqrt() how is it possible?
I am using DEV C++ .

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2  
Please don't use Dev C++. stackoverflow.com/tags/dev-c%2b%2b/info –  Fred Larson Mar 5 '12 at 19:35
3  
Dev-C++ is not a compiler. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 5 '12 at 19:37
1  
@FredLarson You do realize that DevC++ has had a recent update? –  Mysticial Mar 5 '12 at 19:44
    
@Mysticial: Interesting news! However, it's still hardly a recommended player in the IDE field. Perhaps after a few more updates it'll catch up. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 5 '12 at 19:46
    
@Mysticial: Well, I'll be! I thought it was abandonware. Maybe somebody should update the tag info. –  Fred Larson Mar 5 '12 at 20:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This stuff gets compiled into the toolchain runtime, but since GCC and its Windows port MinGW (which is what your Dev-C++ IDE invokes) are open-source, you can just take a look at the source.

Here it is for latest MinGW GCC; both versions appear to defer basically all of the work to the processor (which is not a great surprise, seeing as x86 — by way of the x87 part of the instruction set — supports square root calculations natively).

long double values

#include <math.h>
#include <errno.h>

extern long double  __QNANL;

long double
sqrtl (long double x)
{
  if (x < 0.0L )
    {
      errno = EDOM;
      return __QNANL;
    }
  else
    {
      long double res;
      asm ("fsqrt" : "=t" (res) : "0" (x));
      return res;
    }
}

float values

#include <math.h>
#include <errno.h>

extern float  __QNANF;

float
sqrtf (float x)
{
  if (x < 0.0F )
    {
      errno = EDOM;
      return __QNANF;
    }
  else
    {
      float res;
      asm ("fsqrt" : "=t" (res) : "0" (x));
      return res;
    }
}
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Very informative. +1 for digging that up. –  Johan Lundberg Mar 5 '12 at 20:11

Square roots are calculated by the floating point unit of the processor so there is not much C++ to learn there...

EDIT:

x86 instructions

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86_instruction_listings

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X87

FSQRT - Square root

Even back in the day: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8087

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Now that's shocking news to me... Any reference to back up your brave claim? –  Armen Tsirunyan Mar 5 '12 at 19:39
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8087 –  Johan Lundberg Mar 5 '12 at 19:40
1  
@JohanLundberg: Has that chip been used since the 80s? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X87 is probably a better link. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 5 '12 at 19:43
1  
@karthikgorijavolu: I guess you're not paying attention :(] –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 5 '12 at 20:12
3  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit now understood very well thanks for help –  karthik gorijavolu Mar 5 '12 at 20:41

If there's no source code for your sqrt(), you can always disassemble it. Inspecting the code would be one type of checking.

You can also write a test for sqrt(). That would be the other type of checking.

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What sort of "test" would that be? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 5 '12 at 20:12
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: There are many tests you can do: negative arguments, +/- 0, small positive arguments (normalized and denormalized), large positive arguments, exact squares, +/- infinity, NaNs, see that it's indeed calculating square roots (using predefined values or an alternative sqrt() function), see that it's accurate, see that it's monotonic, etc. You can throw in performance testing too. Is that good enough for a start? –  Alexey Frunze Mar 5 '12 at 20:27
    
I suppose, though it'd be a rather haphazard way of reverse-engineering the code behind your implementation's sqrt. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 5 '12 at 20:39
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: I didn't mean testing as a way of reverse-engineering, though it may reveal certain innards. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 5 '12 at 20:44
    
What did you mean it as, then? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 5 '12 at 20:47

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