Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been programming in java for over a year now but am slowly teaching myself C / objectiveC whilst studying at uni from the book: Cocoa and Objective C - Up and Running. I'm still going through the introductory chapters familiarising myself with syntactical differences in C with java and have come across a section on dynamic memory, specifically on pointers. The example it provides is this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int* numbers;
numbers = malloc ( sizeof(int) * 10);

//create a second variable to always point at the 
//beginning of numbers memory block
int* numbersStart;
numbersStart = numbers;

*numbers = 100;
numbers++;
*numbers = 200;

//use the 'numbersStart' variable to free the memory instead
free( numbersStart );

I understand the code - create an integer pointer, allocate 10 blocks of memory for it, create a second pointer to point at the first dynamic memory block of numbers, set the first block to 100, increment to the 2nd block and set that to 200, then use free() to free memory.

However, when I try to compile I get a series of errors. The code is saved in a c class called Dynamic.c in a folder called dynamic.

here is a print of what occurs in terminal:

    gcc Dynamic.c -o Dynamic
    Dynamic.c:13: warning: data definition has no type or storage class
    Dynamic.c:13: error: conflicting types for ‘numbers’
    Dynamic.c:12: error: previous declaration of ‘numbers’ was here
    Dynamic.c:13: warning: initialization makes integer from pointer without a cast
    Dynamic.c:13: error: initializer element is not constant
    Dynamic.c:15: warning: data definition has no type or storage class
    Dynamic.c:15: error: conflicting types for ‘numbersStart’
    Dynamic.c:14: error: previous declaration of ‘numbersStart’ was here
    Dynamic.c:15: error: initializer element is not constant
    Dynamic.c:16: warning: data definition has no type or storage class
    Dynamic.c:16: warning: initialization makes pointer from integer without a cast
    Dynamic.c:17: error: expected ‘=’, ‘,’, ‘;’, ‘asm’ or ‘__attribute__’ before ‘++’ token
    Dynamic.c:18: warning: data definition has no type or storage class
    Dynamic.c:18: error: redefinition of ‘numbers’
    Dynamic.c:16: error: previous definition of ‘numbers’ was here
    Dynamic.c:18: warning: initialization makes pointer from integer without a cast
    Dynamic.c:19: warning: data definition has no type or storage class
    Dynamic.c:19: warning: parameter names (without types) in function declaration
    Dynamic.c:19: error: conflicting types for ‘free’
    /usr/include/stdlib.h:160: error: previous declaration of ‘free’ was here

If someone could explain why these errors occur I would be much obliged, I don't see why they should be as its an example from a book.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
I think you're missing a main() method. –  Mysticial Mar 5 '12 at 19:40
    
You said The code is saved in a c class . Well, what's a c class? Please show the entire Dynamic.c –  sidyll Mar 5 '12 at 19:43
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Wrap it in a main() function:

#import <stdio.h>
#import <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    int* numbers;
    numbers = malloc ( sizeof(int) * 10);

    //create a second variable to always point at the 
    //beginning of numbers memory block
    int* numbersStart;
    numbersStart = numbers;

    *numbers = 100;
    numbers++;
    *numbers = 200;

    //use the 'numbersStart' variable to free the memory instead
    free( numbersStart );

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Duh!!! I can't believe I forgot to place it in a main.... wow I need to sleep. Thanks a bunch I knew it was something very very simple. –  schQ Mar 5 '12 at 20:30
add comment

That program is no good. You need at least a main() function. Add:

int main(void)
{

Right after the #include lines, and add:

  return 0;
}

at the very end, and it will compile.

share|improve this answer
    
You're just throwing advices into the air. The code posted certainly isn't the whole file he/she is compiling. –  sidyll Mar 5 '12 at 19:44
    
Seriously? Adding those lines does make it compile. If the OP wants a better answer he has to ask a better question. –  Carl Norum Mar 5 '12 at 19:45
    
I know. That's just an advice :-) not to waste your time with something uncertain. The question is unclear, so just leave a comment asking for improvements instead of writing a whole answer. –  sidyll Mar 5 '12 at 19:48
    
Sorry If my initial question wasn't clear Carl Norum was right, and I was being that idiotic to try to compile without a main: I've been coding in java and maxmsp for the past few days so coming back to c when barely awake probably wasn't the best move. Thanks for the simple advice. –  schQ Mar 5 '12 at 21:02
add comment

You need to define a main function:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void)
{
  int* numbers; 
  numbers = malloc ( sizeof(int) * 10);
  ...  
  free( numbersStart );
  return EXIT_SUCCESS; 
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
numbers = malloc ( sizeof(int) * 10);

This is a statement and you cannot have a statement outside of a function in C.

Organize your program with functions and put the statements in the functions body. This is correct:

// This defines a function named foo that takes no argument and returns no value 
void foo(void)
{
    int* numbers;
    numbers = malloc ( sizeof(int) * 10);

    //create a second variable to always point at the 
    //beginning of numbers memory block
    int* numbersStart;
    numbersStart = numbers;

    *numbers = 100;
    numbers++;
    *numbers = 200;

    //use the 'numbersStart' variable to free the memory instead
    free( numbersStart );
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.