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How can I break a list comprehension based on a condition, for instance when the number 412 is found?

Code:

numbers = [951, 402, 984, 651, 360, 69, 408, 319, 601, 485, 980, 507, 725, 547, 544,
           615, 83, 165, 141, 501, 263, 617, 865, 575, 219, 390, 984, 592, 236, 105, 942, 941,
           386, 462, 47, 418, 907, 344, 236, 375, 823, 566, 597, 978, 328, 615, 953, 345, 399,
           162, 758, 219, 918, 237, 412, 566, 826, 248, 866, 950, 626, 949, 687, 217, 815, 67,
           104, 58, 512, 24, 892, 894, 767, 553, 81, 379, 843, 831, 445, 742, 717, 958, 609, 842,
           451, 688, 753, 854, 685, 93, 857, 440, 380, 126, 721, 328, 753, 470, 743, 527]

even = [n for n in numbers if 0 == n % 2]

So functionally, it would be something you can infer this is supposed to do:

even = [n for n in numbers if 0 == n % 2 and break if n == 412]

I really prefer:

  • a one-liner
  • no other fancy libraries like itertools, "pure python" if possible (read: the solution should not use any import statement or similar)
share|improve this question
4  
itertools is pure python. –  Marcin Mar 5 '12 at 19:41
1  
Both conditions can't be fulfilled at the same time. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 5 '12 at 19:42
4  
... itertools is Python ... Overall this sounds like a job for a normal for loop. –  Felix Kling Mar 5 '12 at 19:42
1  
@Flavius: Why is importing something from Python's own library not "showing off its powers"? –  Steven Rumbalski Mar 5 '12 at 19:58
5  
@Flavius: So you are trying to convince your colleagues that you can write something hackish and ugly in Python and that will somehow impress them? –  Steven Rumbalski Mar 5 '12 at 20:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
even = [n for n in numbers[:-1 if 412 not in numbers else numbers.index(412)] if not n % 2] 

Just took F.J.'s code above and added a ternary to check if 412 is in the list. Still a 'one liner' and will work even if 412 is not in the list.

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You can use generator expressions together with itertools.takewhile():

even_numbers = (n for n in numbers if not n % 2)
list(itertools.takewhile(lambda x: x != 412, even_numbers))

Edit: I just noticed the requirement not to use any imports. Well, I leave this answer here anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the right answer. –  Marcin Mar 5 '12 at 19:45
3  
And if he really wants his one liner: [n for n in itertools.takewhile(lambda x: x != 412, numbers) if not n % 2] –  Steven Rumbalski Mar 5 '12 at 19:54

Use a function to raise StopIteration and list to catch it:

>>> def end_of_loop():
...     raise StopIteration
... 
>>> even = list(end_of_loop() if n == 412 else n for n in numbers if 0 == n % 2)
>>> print(even)
[402, 984, 360, 408, 980, 544, 390, 984, 592, 236, 942, 386, 462, 418, 344, 236, 566, 978, 328, 162, 758, 918]

For those complaining it is not a one-liner:

even = list(next(iter(())) if n == 412 else n for n in numbers if 0 == n % 2)

For those complaining it is hackish and should not be used in production code: Well, you're right. Definitely.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not list comprehension, from my understanding, BUT it's an one-liner (I'll consider it as such, since the function is only used because of an unexplicable limitation in python for those raise statements there), and it doesn't seem to have any drawbacks. +1ed –  Flavius Mar 5 '12 at 19:49
1  
Interesting trick! Not that I'd ever use it in real code, but it's a nice observation anyway. –  Sven Marnach Mar 5 '12 at 19:49
4  
Or for a one-liner, replace end_of_loop() with next(iter([])). –  Andrew Clark Mar 5 '12 at 20:01
4  
@F.J Yes, I updated my answer a few minutes before your comment. –  WolframH Mar 5 '12 at 20:04
1  
+1 in light of disclaimer. –  Steven Rumbalski Mar 5 '12 at 22:58

If 412 will definitely be in the list you could use this:

even = [n for n in numbers[:numbers.index(412)] if not n % 2]

If you want to include 412 in the result just use numbers[:numbers.index(412)+1] for the slice.

Note that because of the slice this will be less efficient (at least memory-wise) than an itertools or for loop solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Not only because of the slice it is less efficient, it also has to make a linear search over the list. –  Felix Kling Mar 5 '12 at 19:47
2  
@FelixKling - Nevertheless, in a quick timeit test with the other answers shows that this is faster for the sample data provided. I would definitely expect the others to pass it as the data set increases though. –  Andrew Clark Mar 5 '12 at 19:58
2  
@FelixKling: The linear search for 412 is super-fast C code, while the other solutions test for 412 in Python code, some solutions calling a function (which is expensive in CPython) for every number. I'm sure this solution is faster! -- The list copy is also done in very fast C code; unless you are tight on memory there shouldn't be a performance problem. (OK, if the first number is 412 and the list has 10**6 entries, it's bad; but if 412 is the last number this solution should still be very, very fast.) –  WolframH Mar 5 '12 at 20:30
    
Considering the previous comment, +1ed. –  Flavius Mar 5 '12 at 21:29

The syntax for list displays (including list comprehensions) is here: http://docs.python.org/reference/expressions.html#list-displays

As you can see, there is no special while or until syntax. The closest you can get is:

even_numbers = (n for n in numbers if 0 == n % 2)
list(itertools.takewhile(lambda x: x != 412, even_numbers))

(Code taken from Sven Marnach's answer, posted while I was typing this).

share|improve this answer
    
Downvoter: why? –  Marcin Mar 5 '12 at 19:56
1  
I didn't downvote, but I assume it's because you took the code from someone else. At least you admitted it. I'll upvote it. –  CoffeeRain Mar 5 '12 at 19:59

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