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I'm constantly getting this error whenever I try to pass a array of Strucs into a function.

10: error: expected declaration specifiers or ‘...’ before ‘RECORD’ 113: error: conflicting types for ‘edit’ 10: error: previous declaration of ‘edit’ was here

I also get a lot of warnings about how I use strlen and strcmp about the arguments and how I'm making a pointer from a int without a cast. Is there anything wrong with this?

Can anyone explain to me what's wrong with the code I have so far?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#define MAXLENGTH 51 //longest length of a single record + 1 =51 bytes
#define SIZEOFDB 1000
#define ENCRYPT 5

void add(int argc, char *argv[]);
void del (char *username);
void edit(char *nName, char *nPw, char *nType, char *tName, char *tPw, RECORD *arr);
int verify (char *username, char *password);
void parse (char *record, char *delim, char);

typedef struct rec
{
char name[22];
char pw[22];
char type[6];
}RECORD;

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
int j;
char tempName[22];
char tempPw[22];
char tempType[6];
char newName[22];
char newPw[22];
char newType[6];
static const char filename[] = "password.csv";
FILE *file;
file = fopen(filename, "r+");

if (file == NULL){
    //create csv file password.csv
    printf("Just created password.csv");
    file = fopen(filename, "w+");
}
size_t i =0, count, size = 1000;
RECORD *arr = malloc(size * sizeof *arr);
if (arr){
    char line[51];
    while(i<size && fgets(line, sizeof(line), file)){
        sscanf(line, "%[^','],%[^','],%s", &arr[i].name, &arr[i].pw, &arr[i].type);
        ++i;
    }

    fclose(file);

    if (strcmp(argv[1], "-menu") == 0){
        //menu function
        printf("MENU\n");
    } else if(strcmp( argv[1], "-add") == 0){
        //add function

        strncpy(newName,argv[2],strlen(argv[2]));
        strncpy(newPw,argv[3],strlen(argv[3]));
        strncpy(newType,argv[4], strlen(argv[4]));

        printf("ADD\n");
    } else if(strcmp( argv[1], "-del") == 0){
        //del function

        strncpy(tempName,argv[2], strlen(argv[2]));

        printf("DEL\n");
    } else if(strcmp( argv[1], "-edit") == 0){
        //edit funciton

        strncpy(tempName,argv[2],strlen(argv[2]));
        strncpy(tempPw,argv[3],strlen(argv[3]));
        strncpy(tempType,argv[4],strlen(argv[4]));
        strncpy(newName,argv[5], strlen(argv[5]));
        strncpy(newPw,argv[6], strlen(argv[6]));
        strncpy(newType, argv[7], strlen(argv[7]));

        printf("EDIT\n");
    } else if(strcmp( argv[1], "-verify") == 0){
        //verify function

        strncpy(tempName,argv[2],strlen(argv[2]));
        strncpy(tempPw,argv[3],strlen(argv[3]));

        printf("VERIFY\n");
    } else {
        printf("SYNTAX ERROR\n");
        return 0;
    }
    for (j = 0; j < i; j++){
        printf("%s,%s,%s\n", arr[j].name,arr[j].pw,arr[j].type);
    }
}
free (arr);



return 0;

}

/*void add(char nName[],char nPw[], char nType[], record *arr,FILE *file; ){
int i,j;
if (arr){
char line[51];
while(i<size && fgets(line, sizeof(line), file)){
sscanf(line, "%[^','],%[^','],%s", &arr[i].name, &arr[i].pw, &arr[i].type);
++i
}

}*/

void edit(char *nName,char *nPw, char *nType, char *tName, char *tPw, RECORD *arr){
int i,j;
int size = (sizeof *arr)/(sizeof arr[0]);
for (i=0; i< size; i++){

if ((strcmp( arr[i].name, *tName) == 0 && strcmp (arr[i].pw, *tPw) == 0)){
for (j=0; j<size; j++){
if (strcmp(*nName, arr[j].name) == 0){
printf("ERROR USERNAME ALREADY EXISTS");
break;
}
}
strncpy(arr[i].name, *nName, strlen(*nName));
strncpy(arr[i].pw, *nPw, strlen(*nPw));
strncpy(arr[i].type, *nType, strlen(*nType));
}
}

}

Thanks

share|improve this question
3  
That's some horrendous indentation. –  bernie Mar 5 '12 at 19:47
    
Sorry. I was copying this from vim and it doesn't turn out too well. –  Yamato C Mar 5 '12 at 20:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to declare the RECORD structure before you use it in a parameter list. That is, you should move it to before the forward declarations of your functions.

share|improve this answer
    
Where do I declare it? When I create the array? RECORD *arr = malloc(size * sizeof *arr); –  Yamato C Mar 5 '12 at 19:49
    
Just move the bit that starts with typedef and ends with RECORD; above the function prototypes. –  Carl Norum Mar 5 '12 at 21:22
    
@YamatoC: The C compiler processes files from the top down, so typedef ... RECORD needs to appear before any other occurrence of RECORD in the source file. In this case, the compiler saw RECORD in the edit prototype and said, "you haven't told me what a RECORD is yet, so I can't process this declaration." –  John Bode Mar 5 '12 at 23:52

Try is like this:

typedef struct rec
{
char name[22];
char pw[22];
char type[6];
}RECORD;

void add(int argc, char *argv[]);
void del (char *username);
void edit(char *nName, char *nPw, char *nType, char *tName, char *tPw, RECORD *arr);
int verify (char *username, char *password);
void parse (char *record, char *delim, char);

instead of:

void add(int argc, char *argv[]);
void del (char *username);
void edit(char *nName, char *nPw, char *nType, char *tName, char *tPw, RECORD *arr);
int verify (char *username, char *password);
void parse (char *record, char *delim, char);

typedef struct rec
{
char name[22];
char pw[22];
char type[6];
}RECORD;
share|improve this answer

Try putting the structure definition for "RECORD" before the function declaration for "edit"

share|improve this answer

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