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I am trying to start an external process and wait for it to be active before continuing the execution of my program. I am searching based upon process name, but I have a problem with my implementation if the process name is not what I expect.

//When Method1 is called, it will load the data and bring a pop up
//as adobe save dialog box (as a save dialog exe in the task bar)
Method1(); 

while (true)
{
    foreach (Process clsProcess in Process.GetProcesses())
    {
        if (clsProcess.ProcessName.Contains("AdobeARM"))
        {
            isOpened = true;
        }
    }  

    //Once the pop up from Method 1 comes i call other methods     
    if (isOpened)
    {
        Method2();
        Method3();
        Method4();
        break;
    }
}

This could cause an infinite loop if the process is never found! What is the best way to handle this or alternative to while loop?

share|improve this question
2  
Thread.Sleep(100) –  M.Babcock Mar 5 '12 at 20:09
2  
Set a limit of some kind, either on the number of tries, or the length of time before you give up checking. If you go that route, you should definitely pause between checks (as @M.Babcock suggests.) –  dlev Mar 5 '12 at 20:11
    
Is this intended to check and see if it's running? or monitor and wait until it runs? –  McAden Mar 5 '12 at 20:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Get rid of the while.

It'll perform the check and then if the AdobeARM process is there it will run your methods and if not will skip them. Put everything right there after Method1 in a separate function and call that function from a System.Threading.Timer.

Note that depending on how it is used in your application you may want to add extra handling for threading issues.

private Timer myTimer;

private void DoSomething()
{
    if (myTimer != null)
    {
        myTimer.Dispose();
        myTimer = null;
    }

    Method1();

    myTimer = new Timer(CheckForProcess, null, 100, 100);
}

private void CheckForProcess(object state)
{
    bool isOpened = false;
    foreach (Process clsProcess in Process.GetProcesses())
    {
        if (clsProcess.ProcessName.Contains("AdobeARM"))
        {
            isOpened = true;
            break;
        }
    }

    //Once the pop up from Method 1 comes i call other methods     
    if (isOpened)
    {
        myTimer.Dispose();
        myTimer = null;
        Method2();
        Method3();
        Method4();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Even i tried this, but i think due to timing issue, that is not hitting the isOpened flag and calling other methods. –  Sharpeye500 Mar 5 '12 at 20:30
    
I've made edits. I believe this is more what you're looking for. –  McAden Mar 5 '12 at 20:37
    
'System.Windows.Forms.Timer' does not contain a constructor that takes 4 arguments, is what i get, any thoughts? –  Sharpeye500 Mar 5 '12 at 20:48
    
System.Threading.Timer instead of Timer solved that error. –  Sharpeye500 Mar 5 '12 at 21:05

You say 'I am trying to start an external process and wait for it to be active before continuing', so I suppose you use:

Process prc = new Process(...);
prc.Start();

If so, I will call

prc.WaitForInputIdle();

and then continue.
As from MSDN

WaitForInputIdle - Causes the Process component to wait indefinitely for the associated process to enter an idle state. This overload applies only to processes with a user interface and, therefore, a message loop.

share|improve this answer

May be just break?

while (true)
{


           foreach (Process clsProcess in Process.GetProcesses())
           {
                    if (clsProcess.ProcessName.Contains("AdobeARM"))
                    {
                          isOpened = true;
                    }
           }  
           //Once the pop up from Method 1 comes i call other methods                                  
           if (isOpened)
           {
             Method2();
             Method3();
             Method4();
             break;
           }
           else
             break; //BREAK HERE, CAUSE NO PROCESSES of ADOBE...
}

If you want to come up with this code time after time, use a Timer, but in this case, obviously do not use more while loop.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm assuming he wants to constantly monitor and react when the AdobeARM process is started. In which case, he'd do just as well to just get rid of the 'while' altogether instead of using this solution. –  McAden Mar 5 '12 at 20:15
    
Nope putting a break didn't help, it ran the first method and broke out and didn't hit the other methods. –  Sharpeye500 Mar 5 '12 at 20:15
    
If there is another better way, please share it.Thanks. –  Sharpeye500 Mar 5 '12 at 20:16
1  
If you break out of the loop on its first iteration like this, why even have a while loop? The OP is trying to wait until AdobeARM is running; the problem is that if AdobeARM never starts (or the program that launches has a process name not containing "AdobeARM") the program will never give up. –  KeithS Mar 5 '12 at 20:18
    
@Sharpeye500: not really clear what are those "other methods", sorry. But I suppose, you need use Timer and do not use while loop. In this case you can periodically check for Adobe process presence. And, may be, after some ticks, if the Adobe process still not present, just exit from the program, if this is your intention. –  Tigran Mar 5 '12 at 20:19

Using a sleep always helps

System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100); //100ms pause before continuing

It also would probably make sense to have a counter or something, assuming that if you've looped for more than 500 times (50 seconds with that delay) that you are not going to find it and should break out of the loop.

A pause will allow for your screen to repaint as well, instead of completely locking the thread.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't use Thred.Sleep as method 1 might return less data (less than 100 records or more data (more than 5000), so that depends on the parameter, hence i didn't use the sleep, sleep will help for lesser data. –  Sharpeye500 Mar 5 '12 at 20:14
    
@Sharpeye500 - Your question doesn't contain any contingencies regarding how many records were returned and that really has nothing to do with your question... the issue (as you described it) is "The issue here is if the task manager exe doesn't have something like "AdobeARM" and if it has something else my while loop will go into infinite looping." Yes it will loop infinitely because you never tell it to stop and it'll eat up a lot of CPU cycles unless you tell it to sleep. –  M.Babcock Mar 5 '12 at 20:25

Instead of a while(true), try a while loop that will end based on some timeout value:

//When Method1 is called, it will load the data and bring a pop up
//as adobe save dialog box (as a save dialog exe in the task bar)
Method1(); 

//define a "timeout" time one minute from now. (or whatever)
var timeout = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(60);

//loop only while the current time has not exceeded the timeout
while (DateTime.Now < timeout)
{
    foreach (Process clsProcess in Process.GetProcesses())
    {
        if (clsProcess.ProcessName.Contains("AdobeARM"))
        {
            isOpened = true;
        }
    }  

    //Once the pop up from Method 1 comes i call other methods     
    if (isOpened)
    {
        Method2();
        Method3();
        Method4();
        break;
    }
    else
        Thread.Yield(); //gives other threads CPU time; Thread.Sleep() works too.
}

//If we exit the loop without isOpened being set, we should probably tell someone.
if(!isOpened) throw new Exception("The operation timed out waiting for AdobeARM.");
share|improve this answer
    
+1 to get you out of the red and since this is how I would do it. Question though, isn't Thread.Yield basically the same as DoEvents? I'm pretty sure DoEvents is the spawn of satan. –  M.Babcock Mar 5 '12 at 20:43
    
Thread.Yield() is a code smell. I wouldn't call it as severe as Application.DoEvents(). The use of Yield() or Sleep() indicates a "polling loop" (which is exactly what this is) that is waiting for something else to occur, and there is usually a better solution to the problem (e.g. a Timer). My sample gets him what he needs (a way out of the infinite loop his "while true" construct was creating in a certain circumstance) with minimal code restructuring. –  KeithS Mar 5 '12 at 20:59
    
A Timer might be the cleaner solution overall, but it looks like what he has here is a call that invokes some other process, then waits for that process to spin up. If that never happens, he eventually has to "give up", and a timer that knows how to time out might be considered an even bigger code smell (an event handler with intimate tightly-coupled knowledge about a separate object containing the event it's hooked to?) –  KeithS Mar 5 '12 at 21:15

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