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Does Python have something like an empty string variable where you can do?:

if myString == string.empty:

Regardless what's the most elegant way to check for empty string values? I find hardcoding "" every time for checking an empty string not as good.

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2  
You may have a look at this stackoverflow.com/questions/21979604/… – octoback Feb 24 '14 at 6:47

13 Answers 13

up vote 547 down vote accepted

Empty strings are "falsy" which means they are considered false in a Boolean context, so you can just do this:

if not myString:

This is the preferred way if you know that your variable is a string. If your variable could also be some other type then you should use myString == "". See the documentation on Truth Value Testing for other values that are false in Boolean contexts.

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40  
Be careful, since lots of other things are false as well. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 5 '12 at 20:11
3  
I never heard of the term falsy before. Does it mean it returns false? – Joan Venge Mar 5 '12 at 20:15
16  
@Joan: It evaluates as false in a boolean context. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 5 '12 at 20:16
2  
@Bartek answer below should be taken into consideration too. Being hit by this today, thinking django forms required validation will take care empty string such as " " while it's not. – k4ml Aug 5 '13 at 6:35
12  
OP wants to know if the variable is an empty string, but you would also enter the if not myString: block if myString were None, 0, False etc. So if you aren't sure what type myString is, you should use if myString == "": to determine if it is an empty string as opposed to some other falsy value. – Andrew Clark Aug 7 '13 at 16:08

From PEP 8, in the “Programming Recommendations” section:

For sequences, (strings, lists, tuples), use the fact that empty sequences are false.

So you should use:

if not some_string:

or:

if some_string:
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3  
Great that you included references to the PEP! – Felix Aug 21 '15 at 9:58

The most elegant way would probably be to simply check if its true or falsy, e.g.:

if not my_string:

However, you may want to strip white space because:

 >>> bool("")
 False
 >>> bool("   ")
 True
 >>> bool("   ".strip())
 False

You should probably be a bit more explicit in this however, unless you know for sure that this string has passed some kind of validation and is a string that can be tested this way.

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I would test noneness before stripping. Also, I would use the fact that empty strings are False (or Falsy).

This is what I would use to test if a String is either None OR Empty OR Blank:

def isBlank (myString):
    if myString and myString.strip():
        #myString is not None AND myString is not empty or blank
        return False
    #myString is None OR myString is empty or blank
    return True

And, the exact opposite not None NOR Empty NOR Blank:

def isNotBlank (myString):
    if myString and myString.strip():
        #myString is not None AND myString is not empty or blank
        return True
    #myString is None OR myString is empty or blank
    return False

Lastly, more concise forms:

def isBlank (myString):
    return not (myString and myString.strip())

def isNotBlank (myString):
    return (myString and myString.strip())
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3  
imho this is too much complicated – vault Jan 16 '15 at 11:03
    
why not if mystring and not mystring.strip()? – Migol Feb 3 '15 at 14:06
2  
This answer is the correct solution. And it is not too complicated. – asmaier Mar 10 '15 at 13:23
    
How is it different from string and not string.isspace()? – Andrea Corbellini May 9 '15 at 7:50
2  
More concise for those who care about such things: def isBlank(s): return not (s and s.strip()) and def isNotBlank(s): return s and s.strip(). – Carl Dec 8 '15 at 10:07
a = ''
b = '   '
a.isspace() -> False
b.isspace() -> True
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3  
In a case it's not True. a should contain at least one character str.isspace – abele Oct 21 '13 at 19:04
    
Yeah, this post is .. wrong. I'll change it to be right, but it no longer qualifies as an answer to the question at all. – Yuki Izumi Feb 24 '14 at 0:55

If you want to differentiate between empty and null strings, I would suggest using if len(string), otherwise, I'd suggest using simply if string as others have said. The caveat about strings full of whitespace still applies though, so don't forget to strip.

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if stringname: gives a false when the string is empty. I guess it can't be simpler than this.

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I once wrote something similar to Bartek's answer and javascript inspired:

def isNotEmpty(s):
    return bool(s and s.strip())

Test:

print isNotEmpty("")    # False
print isNotEmpty("   ") # False
print isNotEmpty("ok")  # True
print isNotEmpty(None)  # False
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for those who expect a behaviour like the apache StringUtils.isBlank or Guava Strings.isNullOrEmpty :

if mystring and mystring.strip():
    print "not blank string"
else:
    print "blank string"
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Test empty or blanc string (shorter way):

if myString.strip():
    print("is't not an empty or blanc string")
else:
    print("is't an empty or blanc string")
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How about this? Perhaps it's not "the most elegant", but it seems pretty complete, clear, and safe to me:

if (s is None) or (str(s).strip()==""): // STRING s IS "EMPTY"...

Is there a possibility for an exception or a false positive with this?

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You may have a look at this Assigning empty value or string in Python

This is about comparing strings that are empty. So instead of testing for emptiness with not, you may test is your string is equal to empty string with "" the empty string...

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As prmatta posted above, but with mistake.

def isNoneOrEmptyOrBlankString (myString):
    if myString:
        if not myString.strip():
            return True
        else:
            return False
    return False
share|improve this answer
    
Just tested: His code returns True for "" and " " and False for "a" (just as expected). Your code returns the same, except for the empty string it returns True, what it shouldn't. – AbcAeffchen Nov 2 '14 at 1:05
    
Why not? The method name is: IS none or empty or blank string..... – Shadow Nov 2 '14 at 18:08
    
sry too tired: Your code returns False for the empty string. – AbcAeffchen Nov 2 '14 at 18:33
    
This code is wrong. You return False if a string is empty or none. – rouble Jan 16 '15 at 16:15
    
Did you even read what we talked above? – Shadow Jan 17 '15 at 18:04

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