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Good afternoon all,

From what I understand, Android has (at least) 2 file systems. One is for "internal" storage (e.g. /data and /system) and the other for "external" storage (e.g. /mnt/sdcard),

This implies that when we save files to "internal" storage (Context.getFilesDir, Context.getCacheDir), the file separator used may be different from when we save files to "external" storage (Context.getExternalFilesDir, Context.getExternalCacheDir, Environment.getExternalStoragePublicDirectory), yet java.io.File.separator only seems to give us information on the "default" filesystem used.

How do we get the different file separators used by the different file systems on Android?

I've tried java.nio.file.spi.FileSystemProvider.installedProviders() but it looks like android doesn't have this package.

Is there anyway to get a list of filesystems on Android?

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What makes you think that path separator can be different? All in all, the OS is Linux and the filesystem stuff is handled by the OS. –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Mar 5 '12 at 20:37
    
@EugeneMayevski'EldoSCorp Hmm, I've heard of mountaing the external drive on a NTFS which is why I think that they can be different –  Pacerier Mar 5 '12 at 20:39
    
Common sense tells me, that the driver must follow path rules on the platform for which it's built (at least it is so on Windows and MacOS X), so even NTFS driver would work with forward slashes (which are, btw, valid on Windows as well) as path separators. And most OS functions will only handle forward slashes anyway. –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Mar 5 '12 at 20:52
    
@EugeneMayevski'EldoSCorp However its not just the file separators, the file delimiters (path separators) are also different between different file systems. –  Pacerier Mar 5 '12 at 20:54
    
no they are not. The file system (data structure) doesn't know anything about path separators. It's the driver that does. And drivers must follow OS rules (which they can combine with filesystem rules or limitations, but still OS rules must be followed). –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Mar 5 '12 at 20:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

From what I understand, Android has (at least) 2 file systems. One is for "internal" storage (e.g. /data and /system) and the other for "external" storage (e.g. /mnt/sdcard),

That was accurate for Android 1.x and 2.x. As of Android 3.0, external storage is merely a directory inside of internal storage.

This implies that when we save files to "internal" storage (Context.getFilesDir, Context.getCacheDir), the file separator used may be different from when we save files to "external" storage

Of course not. Separators are a feature of an operating system, not a file system.

Is there anyway to get a list of filesystems on Android?

Nothing that is supported. SDK applications should only use internal and external storage, such as via the APIs you cited in your answer.

Hmm, I've heard of mountaing the external drive on a NTFS which is why I think that they can be different

You are mistaken. File and path separators have nothing to do with the format of the file system.

However its not just the file separators, the file delimiters (path separators) are also different between different file systems.

You are mistaken. File and path separators have nothing to do with the format of the file system.

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Thanks for the easy to digest answer =) –  Pacerier Mar 6 '12 at 3:30

If you're concerned about putting a hardcoded file separator in your code you can use File.separator in place of hardcoded "/". This will give you the file separator used by Android without having concern of whatever file system lies underneath

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