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I have a ordered binary tree:
              4
              |
          |-------|
          2       5
          |
      |-------|
      1       3

The leaves point to null. I have to create a doubly link list which should look like

1<->2<->3<->4<->5

(Obviously 5 should point to 1)

The node class is as follows:

class Node {
    Node left;
    Node right;
    int value;

    public Node(int value)
    {
        this.value = value;
        left = null;
        right = null;
    }
}

As you can see the doubly link list is ordered (sorted) as well.

Question: I have to create the linked list form the tree without using any extra pointers. The left pointer of the tree should be the previous pointer of the list and the right pointer of the tree should be the next pointer of the list.

What I thought off: Since the tree is an ordered tree, the inorder traversal would give me a sorted list. But while doing the inorder traversal I am not able to see, where and how to move the pointers to form a doubly linked list.

P.S I checked some variations of this question but none of them gave me any clues.

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Why can't you use ANY extra pointers? Doesn't sound like realistic limitation. You should mark it as homework if it's an exercise. –  Lycha Mar 5 '12 at 21:00
    
This is not a homework. I was reading for my interview and found this question. Its the exact problem statement. –  noMAD Mar 5 '12 at 21:01
    
When you say "without using any extra pointers" does it actually mean "in place, without creating any new Node objects"? –  Ted Hopp Mar 5 '12 at 21:36
    
Yes, that's what I intended to say. –  noMAD Mar 5 '12 at 21:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It sounds like you need a method that accepts a Node reference to the root of the tree and returns a Node reference to the head of a circular list, where no new Node objects are created. I would approach this recursively, starting with the simple tree:

   2
   |
|-----|
1     3

You don't say whether the tree is guaranteed to be full, so we need to allow for 1 and/or 3 being null. The following method should work for this simple tree:

Node simpleTreeToList(Node root) {
    if (root == null) {
        return null;
    }
    Node left = root.left;
    Node right = root.right;
    Node head;
    if (left == null) {
        head = root;
    } else {
        head = left;
        left.right = root;
        // root.left is already correct
    }
    if (right == null) {
        head.left = root;
        root.right = head;
    } else {
        head.left = right;
        right.right = head;
        right.left = root;
    }
    return head;
}

Once it is clear how this works, it isn't too hard to generalize it to a recursive method that works for any tree. It is a very similar method:

Node treeToList(Node root) {
    if (root == null) {
        return null;
    }
    Node leftTree = treeToList(root.left);
    Node rightTree = treeToList(root.right);
    Node head;
    if (leftTree == null) {
        head = root;
    } else {
        head = leftTree;
        leftTree.left.right = root;
        root.left = leftTree.left;
    }
    if (rightTree == null) {
        head.left = root;
        root.right = head;
    } else {
        head.left = rightTree.left;
        rightTree.left.right = head;
        rightTree.left = root;
        root.right = rightTree;
    }
    return head;
}

If I got all the link assignments covered correctly, this should be all you need.

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Can you explain why its //case rightree!=null. head.left=rightTree.left.right? Shouldnt it be head.left=rightTree.right.right. ? Great post, btw. –  KodeSeeker Nov 3 '13 at 22:59
    
@KodeSeeker - Actually, that's a bug (now fixed), it should be head.left = rightTree.left (not rightTree.left.right, which is just rightTree). If rightTree is not null, then it is (the head of) a circular list of the nodes in the right tree. The previous node to head needs to be the last node of the rightTree list; that node is rightTree.left. (I knew I needed that caveat at the end!) –  Ted Hopp Nov 4 '13 at 0:28
    
after this line "rightTree.left = root;", I think we need to call "root.right = rightTree;". Is it correct? –  XWang Feb 19 at 10:14
    
@XWang - Yes, you're correct. I'll fix that now. –  Ted Hopp Feb 19 at 15:31

Do an in-order traversal of the list, adding each list item to the doubly linked list as you encounter it. When done, add an explicit link between the first and last items.

Update 3/6/2012: Since you must reuse the Node objects you already have, after you put the node objects into the the list, you can then iterate over the list and reset the left and right pointers of the Node objects to point to their siblings. Once that is done, you can get rid of the list and simply return the first node object.

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I think the challenge is to use the existing Node objects in-place, without allocating anything new. –  Ted Hopp Mar 5 '12 at 21:26

This should also work:

NodeLL first = null;
NodeLL last = null;
private void convertToLL(NodeBST root) {
    if (root == null) {
        return;
    }
    NodeLL newNode = new NodeLL(root.data);
    convertToLL(root.left);   
    final NodeLL l = last;
    last = newNode;
    if (l == null)
        first = newNode;
    else {
        l.next = newNode;
        last.prev = l;
    }
    convertToLL(root.right);
}
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Add the following method to your Node class

public Node toLinked() {
    Node leftmost = this, rightmost = this;
    if (right != null) {
        right = right.toLinked();
        rightmost = right.left;
        right.left = this;
    }
    if (left != null) {
        leftmost = left.toLinked();
        left = leftmost.left;
        left.right = this;
    }
    leftmost.left = rightmost;
    rightmost.right = leftmost;
    return leftmost;
}

EDIT By maintaining the invariant that the list returned by toLinked() has the proper form, you can easily get the left- and rightmost nodes in the sublist returned by the recursive call on the subtrees

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/*  input: root of BST. Output: first node of a doubly linked sorted circular list. **Constraints**: do it in-place.     */

public static Node transform(Node root){

        if(root == null){
            return null;
        }

        if(root.isLeaf()){

            root.setRight(root);
            root.setLeft(root);
            return root;

        }

        Node firstLeft = transform(root.getLeft());
        Node firstRight = transform(root.getRight());
        Node lastLeft = firstLeft == null ? null : firstLeft.getLeft();
        Node lastRight=  firstRight == null ? null : firstRight.getLeft();

        if(firstLeft != null){

           lastLeft.setRight(root);
           root.setLeft(lastLeft);

           if(lastRight == null){

               firstLeft.setLeft(root);

           }
           else{

               firstLeft.setLeft(lastRight);
               root.setRight(firstRight);
           }
        }

        if(firstRight != null){

           root.setRight(firstRight);
           firstRight.setLeft(root);       

           if(lastLeft == null){

               root.setLeft(lastRight);
               lastRight.setLeft(root);
               firstLeft = root;

           }
           else{

               root.setLeft(lastLeft);
               lastRight.setRight(firstLeft);
           }
        }

        return firstLeft;
}
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