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I've the following code:

#include <iostream>

typedef void ( *FuncPtr )( int );

extern void MyFunc( FuncPtr callback )    

class MyClass
{
public:
    void SomeFunction( int n )
    {
        std::cout << "bla: " << n << std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    MyClass obj;
    MyFunc( /*  */ );
}

What is the best and safety way to pass in MyFunc function as a parameter a function of class without (SomeFunction) boost?

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1  
parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/pointers-to-members.html –  user195488 Mar 5 '12 at 21:03
1  
Declare SomeFunction as static. –  Kerrek SB Mar 5 '12 at 21:04
    
Is the question "how do you pass a pointer to member function as a function parameter"? –  Jesse Good Mar 5 '12 at 21:07

2 Answers 2

You can't, and even if your compiler allows it, I'm sure you'd get into undefined behavior.

SomeFunction is not like a free function, it is a member function. That means it operates on an object, so calling it outside of context is a sure path to disaster.

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The idiom for C callbacks is to include user data which passes an arbitrary parameter through the function and back into the callback:

typedef void ( *FuncPtr )( int, uintptr_t user_data );

extern void MyFunc( FuncPtr callback, uintptr_t user_data );

When invoking a method on a class with a callback you use the user_data to pass the this pointer:

class MyClass
{
public:
    void SomeFunction( int n )
    {
        std::cout << "bla: " << n << std::endl;
    }
private:
    static void SomeFunctionEntry( int n, uintptr_t user_data)
    {
        MyClass *ths = (MyClass *) user_data;
        ths->SomeFunction(n);
    }
};

The static function SomeFunctionEntry is a free function which can be invoked as a callback. You ensure its user_data argument is a valid class instance:

int main()
{
    MyClass obj;
    MyFunc(&MyClass::SomeFunctionEntry, (uintptr_t) &obj);
}

(side note: it is a very bad idea to pass an automatic variable like obj as a callback in a multithreaded environment because it is difficult to be sure that the pointer will still be valid when the callback is eventually invoked)

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+1 complete answer, even the classic "very bad idea" is in there :) –  Luchian Grigore Mar 5 '12 at 21:22

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