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I am trying to pass a double* which holds an array of doubles, into the constructor of my class, and assign the value element for element.

Main:

int main()
{
    double* data = new double[4];
    data[0] = 1.1; data[1] = 2.2; data[2] = 3.3; data[3] = 4.4;

    Matrix a(2,2,data);

    return 0;
}

And this is my constructor:

Matrix::Matrix(int M, int N, double* input_data)
{
    this->M = M;
    this->N = N;

    cout << "Matrix Constructor: M: " << M << "\tN: " << N << endl;

    for (int i = 0; i < M; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < N; j++)
        {
            data[i*N+j] = input_data[i*N+j]; //***This is the problem***
        }
    }

}

Any attempt to index past input_data[0] in the constructor causes a crash. data[] can be accessed fine, and I can index past input_data[0] of data in my main function.

I'm assuming this should not be done this way, and would appreciate any nudge in the right direction.

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2  
How does your Matrix::data look like? Where and how is it initialized? –  Griwes Mar 5 '12 at 21:17
    
I'm not seeing a problem in the code posted here. Can you post your class definition? –  Dennis Mar 5 '12 at 21:18
    
@Griwes since it seems data is dynamically allocated (M and N are passed as parameters), this seems to be the problem - he's not allocating memory for it. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 5 '12 at 21:20
    
@LuchianGrigore, I know, I was trying to put his mind into right direction. –  Griwes Mar 5 '12 at 21:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It seems that you're not allocating memory for data in your constructor.

Matrix::Matrix(int M, int N, double* input_data)
{
   data = new double[M*N];
   //....
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very much obliged! Why am I incapable of spotting the smallest of errors >.< This is an overloaded constructor, and my original contains the allocation, so I have no excuse for missing this. –  LBHoward Mar 5 '12 at 21:24
    
@LBHoward glad to help! –  Luchian Grigore Mar 5 '12 at 21:25
    
@LBHoward also, as LihO pointed out, don't forget to free the memory in the destructor. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 5 '12 at 21:25
    
It's all in place, just commented out in the actual file, though thank you both for the reminder, the frame of mind I am tonight I wouldn't be suprised if I forgot. –  LBHoward Mar 5 '12 at 21:28

I assume that data is a member of Matrix class declared as double*.

You should allocate memory for this member in your constructor:

this->M = M;
this->N = N;
data = new double[M * N];
...

Don't forget to call delete[] data; in destructor. You should also call delete[] data; at the end of main.

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Just for the sake of nit-picking, it's not necessary to call delete[] data; in main() since the memory will be released anyway. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 5 '12 at 21:23
    
@LuchianGrigore: True, but I still recommend to call it. At least you will get used to cleaning up after yourself. –  LihO Mar 5 '12 at 21:33
    
That's true.... –  Luchian Grigore Mar 5 '12 at 21:53

You never allocated the memory to store the data.

Matrix::Matrix(int M, int N, double* input_data)
{
    this->M = M;
    this->N = N;
    data = new double[N * M]; // Allocate space for N * M elements

    cout << "Matrix Constructor: M: " << M << "\tN: " << N << endl;

    for (int i = 0; i < M; i++)
     {
         for (int j = 0; j < N; j++)
         {
             data[i*N+j] = input_data[i*N+j]; //***This is the problem***
         }
     }

}

In C++, in order to allow for dynamic arrays like that you need to explicitly say that data is an array of size N * M. Otherwise, you're assigning into an undefined location which can be anywhere.

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Did you allocate memory for data? Can't see that anywhere. However, I would not even bother with a constructor like that. Just take the dimensions as parameters (or as template parameters, but that's another thing I guess) and use a std::vector. Initialize the vector with N*M elements and overload the operator () for element access:

double& operator () (std::size_t i, std::size_t j);
const double& operator () (std::size_t i, std::size_t j) const;
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As everyone pointed out, you didn't allocate space for data. Additionally, you'll need to provide a useful destructor, copy-constructor, and assignment operator.

All of this mishigas goes away if you use std::vector:

std::vector<double> data;
Matrix::Matrix(int M, int N, double* input_data)
  : M(M), N(N), data(input_data, input_data+M*N)
{
  // No work required in here
}
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