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When I run the following code, it does not enter the "do something here" section:

my $a ='µ╫P[┐╬♣3▀═<+·1╪מ└╖"ª';
my $b ='µ╫P[┐╬♣3▀═<+·1╪מ└╖"ª';

if ($a ne $b) {
    # do something here    
}

Is there another way to compare Unicode strings with perl?

share|improve this question
2  
Why would you need another way? Is there something that you're looking for that the built-in string comparisons (eq, ne, gt, lt, ge, and le) don't provide? –  Jack Maney Mar 5 '12 at 21:26
2  
If the strings are equal (as they appear to be) then I would expect that the do something here block would not be entered. –  David Harris Mar 5 '12 at 21:29
6  
For Perl to see the file as you do, it had to be encoded as UTF-8 and you had to use use utf8; Assuming you did that, Perl will do a code-point by code-point comparison of the string. What problems are you having? Do you need to normalize them first? –  ikegami Mar 5 '12 at 21:46

1 Answer 1

If you have two Unicode strings (i.e. string of Unicode code points), then you have surely saved your file as UTF-8 and you actually had

use utf8;  # Tell Perl source code is UTF-8.

my $a = 'µ╫P[┐╬♣3▀═<+·1╪מ└╖"ª';
my $b = 'µ╫P[┐╬♣3▀═<+·1╪מ└╖"ª';

if ($a eq $b) {
    print("They're equal.\n");
} else {
    print("They're not equal.\n");
}

And that works perfectly fine. eq and ne will compare the strings code point by code point.

Certain graphemes (e.g. "é") can be built multiple different ways, so you might have to normalize their representation first.

use utf8;  # Tell Perl source code is UTF-8.

use charnames          qw( :full );  # For \N{}
use Unicode::Normalize qw( NFC );

my $a = NFC("\N{LATIN SMALL LETTER E WITH ACUTE}");
my $b = NFC("e\N{COMBINING ACUTE ACCENT}");

if ($a eq $b) {
    print("They're equal.\n");
} else {
    print("They're not equal.\n");
}

Finally, Unicode considers certain characters almost equivalent, and they can be considered equal using a different form of normalization.

use utf8;  # Tell Perl source code is UTF-8.

use charnames          qw( :full );  # For \N{}
use Unicode::Normalize qw( NFKC );

my $a = NFKC("2");
my $b = NFKC("\N{SUPERSCRIPT TWO}");

if ($a eq $b) {
    print("They're equal.\n");
} else {
    print("They're not equal.\n");
}
share|improve this answer
7  
$a and $b are not good variables to lexicalize, because sort { fc($a) cmp fc($b) } @list will never work then. Also with normalization, there are the 33 singletons, which aren’t a matter of ordering of marks. Finally, he may want some sort of comparison better accomplished with a Unicode::Collate object, but we won’t know that without clarification. Me, I’m betting he has a program literal he’s comparing with something that he read in from a stream, and he hasn’t got all his utf8nesses in all the right places. Can’t tell, ’cause code snippet he gave isn’t telling the real story. –  tchrist Mar 5 '12 at 22:07
    
@tchrist, Those singletons are no exception to what I said. Those singletons (e.g. KELVIN SIGN) have the same grapheme (visual representation) as the letters (e.g. "LATIN CAPITAL LETTER K") to which they are considered equal. –  ikegami Mar 5 '12 at 22:17
    
You said “can be composed in multiple ways”. That suggests something involving combining characaters to me, and singletons are something else. They aren’t a big deal though. The ordering-of-marks aspect of normalization is usually a lot more important, except in certain legacy texts with the old singletons in them. –  tchrist Mar 5 '12 at 22:21
    
@tchrist, Having encountered it in music, photography and chemistry, order is just one of many factor involved in composition for me. But since you take order to be the primary factor of composition, I changed "composed" to "built" in my answer. –  ikegami Mar 7 '12 at 0:52

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