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All -

I am trying to dynamically (at runtime) want to create a people collection which has 3 attributes - Name, Skillset and Collection of addresses.

the problem I am facing is I cant add the address in the following line at the time of instantiate.

people.Add(new Person() { Name = "John Smith", Skillset = "Developer", _________ });

So essentially how do i combine these 3 lines into 1 so I can pass it above:

Person per = new Person();
per.Complete_Add = new List<Address>();
per.Complete_Add.Add(new Address("a", "b"));

Here is my full program:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        PersonViewModel personViewModel = new PersonViewModel();
    }
}

public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Skillset { get; set; }
    public List<Address> _address;
    public List<Address> Complete_Add
    {
        get { return _address; }
        set { _address = value; }
    }
}

public class Address
{
    public string HomeAddress { get; set; }
    public string OfficeAddress { get; set; }

    public Address(string _homeadd, string _officeadd)
    {
        HomeAddress = _homeadd;
        OfficeAddress = _officeadd;
    }

}

public class PersonViewModel
{
    public PersonViewModel()
    {
        people = new List<Person>();
        Person per = new Person();                   \\Dont want to do this
        per.Complete_Add = new List<Address>();      \\Dont want to do this
        per.Complete_Add.Add(new Address("a", "b")); \\Dont want to do this
        people.Add(new Person() { Name = "John Smith", Skillset = "Developer", Complete_Add = per.Complete_Add });
        people.Add(new Person() { Name = "Mary Jane", Skillset = "Manager" });
        people.Add(new Person() { Name = null, Skillset = null });
    }

    public List<Person> people
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can still do it through Property Initialisers

 people.Add(new Person() { Name = "John Smith", Skillset = "Developer", 
      Complete_Add = new List<Address>
      {
           new Address("a", "b")
       }});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks everybody - the property initialisers works - its the {} brackets which I was missing. Really appreciate the help here – Patrick Mar 5 '12 at 21:38

I believe that's what constructors are for. Create a constructor for Person, and initialize the properties as you see fit.

share|improve this answer

you should do your initialization in the constructors:

public class Person
{
   public Person() 
   {
      this._address = new List<Address>();
      this.Complete_Add = new List<Address>();
   }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Skillset { get; set; }
    public List<Address> _address;
    public List<Address> Complete_Add
    {
        get { return _address; }
        set { _address = value; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Wouldn't this work:

Person per = new Person() { Complete_Add = new List<Address>() { new Address("a", "b") } };

?

share|improve this answer

You can also have your property instantiate the list if it is not already

private List<Address> _address;
public List<Address> Complete_Add
{
    get { return _address = _address ?? new List<Address>(); }
}
share|improve this answer

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