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I just write a simple program to print the address of variable.

#include <stdio.h>

void main(){
  int *a;
  int b;

  b=5;
  a=&b;

  printf("\n*a is the value of the integer:  %d\n",*a);
  printf("&a is the address of variable a: %p\n", &a);
  printf(" a is the address stored in a:   %p\n",a);
  printf("&b is the address of variable b: %p\n\n",&b);
}

The result is:

*a is the value of the integer:  5
&a is the address of variable a: 0x7fff935ad2b0
 a is the address stored in a:   0x7fff935ad2bc
&b is the address of variable b: 0x7fff935ad2bc

Why the addresses printed are not in the standard form?

Sorry for the silly question, but I just don't understand.

EDIT

I have another program

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

struct small{
  int a;
};

int main(){
   struct small *sm;

   sm = malloc(sizeof(struct small));
   memset(sm,0,sizeof(struct small));

   sm->a = 5;

   printf("The address of sm is: %p\n", &sm);
   printf("The address stored in sm is: %p\n", sm);

   return 0;
}

The output is:

The address of sm is: 0x7fffd1363158
The address stored in sm is: 0x17a3010

So I expected the format 0x17a3010 is somewhat standard to me.

And again why in this case the format of %p is different?

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closed as not a real question by casperOne Mar 6 '12 at 22:04

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
What is "standard form" ? –  cnicutar Mar 5 '12 at 21:55
1  
Are you wondering why it's printed in hexadecimal (0x...) instead of decimal? –  Marlon Mar 5 '12 at 21:55
    
That is the standard form. What were you expecting them to look like? –  egrunin Mar 5 '12 at 21:55
    
To be 100% C conformant (both C89 and C99) you need to cast the pointer values to (void*). ... and make main return an int: void main is just plain wrong. –  pmg Mar 5 '12 at 21:56
    
0x17a3010 is the same as 0x00000000017a3010. Try printf("%018p\n", (void*)sm); ... –  pmg Mar 5 '12 at 22:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That is called hexadecimal, i.e., base-16. It makes it easier to view groups of bits as bytes than binary or base-10 would. I'm not sure I understand your question. There is no "standard form", but if there were one this would be it.

Per your edit:

The output is:

The address of sm is: 0x7fffd1363158 The address stored in sm is: 0x17a3010 So I expected the format 0x17a3010 is somewhat standard to me.

And again why in this case the format of %p is different?

Those two are exactly the same. 0x17a3010 is no different than 0x00000000017a3010.

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Where is 0x00000000017a3010 to be found in the question? 0x7fffd1363158 and 0x17a3010 are quite obviously not "exactly the same". –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Mar 6 '12 at 2:07
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: They are "quite obviously the same" when talking about the format. What about the question confuses you exactly? Obviously they are not the same number, but I would have thought you would be able to figure out the intent on your own. –  Ed S. Mar 6 '12 at 19:12
    
The question doesn't confuse me at all. Quite the opposite: I believe my answer is the only one to actually address the question posed. The figures given are different both in length and in content, and you've just jumped to the conclusion that the OP is ignoring that, instead looking at two hexadecimal numbers purely for their base and finding some reason there that one should be valid and the other not.. which is nonsensical. –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Mar 6 '12 at 19:18
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Well, to be fair, we are all guessing at what is confusing the OP. All that s/he says is that the format of the printed value seems non-standard... to them. Not much to go on. –  Ed S. Mar 6 '12 at 20:03
    
FWIW, I don't feel like I'm guessing. –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Mar 7 '12 at 3:13

The standard doesn't say what format should be used for %p.

The argument shall be a pointer to void. The value of the pointer is converted to a sequence of printable characters, in an implementation-defined manner.

So, often that will be hexadecimal since it's the most comfortable when working with addresses.

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So I expected the format 0x17a3010 is somewhat standard to me.

And again why in this case the format of %p is different?

I suppose that it's just because the upper part of that number is all zeroes, so it's truncated, exactly how you normally write 1 instead of 0000000000001.

The two addresses probably are so distant because one address is on the stack, the other one on the heap, and the two happen to be at the opposite ends of the virtual address space on your system (this is actually quite a common implementation).

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It looks like you're used to addresses with low values, such as 0x17a3010, and have instead seen a high value such as 0x7fffd1363158. You have been surprised by the increased number of digits in such a value.

Do not be alarmed; in your case, apparently, the lower value represents a position in your "heap" and the higher value represents a position in your "stack".

Neither pointer value is more "standard" than the other; they simply lie at different ends of the spectrum, thanks to where your various sections of virtual address space happen to be.

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The %p format specifier formats addresses in hex; this is a common format for memory addresses.

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see @cnicutar answer, it is implementation defined –  ouah Mar 5 '12 at 21:58
    
Whether %p formats in hex, octal, decimal, ones-complement base-nine, or as a SHA-1 hash is completely up to the implementation. (Some of these are more likely than others…) –  J. C. Salomon Mar 5 '12 at 22:01
1  
Wouldn't hash collisions mean aliasing violations in your SHA-1 implementation? You'd think that different objects should also print different addresses... –  Kerrek SB Mar 5 '12 at 22:08
1  
Not just should; must. A pointer printed by printf is required to survive the round-trip back to a pointer via scanf. –  R.. Mar 5 '12 at 22:16

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