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I'm learning Haskell and solving some programming problems on spoj.pl. The idea of the problem is the following: calculate summation of proper divisors of a number.

So my program reads number of numbers in the first line. Then read a number. Factorizes it (a1^p1 * a2^p2) and calculates (a1 ^ (p1 + 1) - 1) / (a1 - 1) * ... But program works slow. It takes 4 seconds to process 200000 numbers. Same program on c does it in 0.84 seconds. Please help me to optimize it. Code style criticism is also welcomed.

Here is the source code:

main = do
        nRaw <- getLine
        let n = (read nRaw)::Int in 
         loop n (do
                  vS <- getLine
                  let v = (read vS)::Int in
                   putStrLn (show (solve v))
                )

loop 1 a = a
loop n a = do a
              loop (n - 1) a

simples = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97, 101, 103, 107, 109, 113, 127, 131, 137, 139, 149, 151, 157, 163, 167, 173, 179, 181, 191, 193, 197, 199, 211, 223, 227, 229, 233, 239, 241, 251, 257, 263, 269, 271, 277, 281, 283, 293, 307, 311, 313, 317, 331, 337, 347, 349, 353, 359, 367, 373, 379, 383, 389, 397, 401, 409, 419, 421, 431, 433, 439, 443, 449, 457, 461, 463, 467, 479, 487, 491, 499, 503, 509, 521, 523, 541, 547, 557, 563, 569, 571, 577, 587, 593, 599, 601, 607, 613, 617, 619, 631, 641, 643, 647, 653, 659, 661, 673, 677, 683, 691, 701, 709, 719, 727, 733, 739, 743, 751, 757, 761, 769, 773, 787, 797, 809, 811, 821, 823, 827, 829, 839, 853, 857, 859, 863, 877, 881, 883, 887, 907, 911, 919, 929, 937, 941, 947, 953, 967, 971, 977, 983, 991, 997]

solve n = (subsolve n simples 1 1 n) - n

subsolve n [] ansnum ansden threshold = (ansnum `div` ansden)
subsolve n (x:spls) ansnum ansden threshold | x * x > threshold    = if n > 1 then subsolve n [] (ansnum * (n * n - 1)) (ansden * (n - 1)) threshold
                                                                              else subsolve n [] ansnum ansden threshold
                                            | (n `mod` x) == 0 = (let (a, p) = (getPower n x 1)
                                                                   in (subsolve a spls (ansnum * ((x * p) - 1)) (ansden * (x - 1)) threshold))
                                            | otherwise        = subsolve n spls ansnum ansden threshold

getPower n x ans | n `mod` x == 0 = getPower (n `div` x) x (ans * x)
                 | n `mod` x /= 0 = (n, ans)

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
Is there a bug with your usage of getPower? You only call it once with getPower n x 0, but having ans == 0 means the result always (n,ans) always is in the form (n,0). –  David Miani Mar 5 '12 at 23:32
    
Yes, there was a bug. Now fixed. Thanks. –  Victor Denisov Mar 6 '12 at 5:30
    
First thing to check : do you compile with optimization (-O2) ? That makes a large difference. I guess you do but it doesn't hurt to ask :) –  Jedai Mar 6 '12 at 20:39
    
Yes, I compile it with -O2 –  Victor Denisov Mar 9 '12 at 4:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Reading numbers from standard input can be expressed much more clearly using Haskell's lazy IO.

main :: IO ()
main = interact $ unlines . map (show . solve . read) . tail . lines

solve :: Int -> Int
solve ...

This will make your code more elegant, but not faster. If the IO and parsing numbers are the bottleneck (you can check it by using the profiler), you should consider using the Data.Text module which is more efficient than using lists of characters (String).

Unfortunately the price you gain for increased efficiency with Data.Text is that the code becomes more verbose and clunky. For example:

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}
import qualified Data.Text.Lazy as Text
import qualified Data.Text.Lazy.IO as Text
import qualified Data.Text.Lazy.Read as R
import qualified Data.Text.Lazy.Builder.Int as B
import qualified Data.Text.Lazy.Builder as B

main :: IO ()
main = Text.interact $ 
   Text.unlines . map (showInt . solve . readInt) . tail . Text.lines

readInt x = case R.decimal x of
  Left err -> error err
  Right (i,"") -> i

showInt = B.toLazyText . B.decimal  

(And would be even more clunky if I used the Builder module properly instead of converting a Builder to lazy text for each line)

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this, but my version of haskell doesn't have Builder.Int package and spoj.pl judge as well. I tried to use ByteString, but I don't know how to convert Int to ByteString. –  Victor Denisov Mar 7 '12 at 1:50
    
    
Yes, I see the readInt function. But how can I convert Int to ByteString? –  Victor Denisov Mar 9 '12 at 2:23
    
I used this line, and it was enough. May be there is better solution. main = C.interact $ C.unlines . map (C.pack . show . solve . fst . M.fromJust . C.readInt) . tail . C.lines –  Victor Denisov Mar 9 '12 at 5:00
    
@VictorDenisov: You could try the packDecimal function from hackage.haskell.org/packages/archive/bytestring-lexing/0.4.0/… –  Grzegorz Chrupała Mar 9 '12 at 21:46

Whenever you have something like

foo .... | condition     = result1
         | not condition = result2

You can rewrite it as

foo .... | condition     = result1
         | otherwise     = result2

This probably saves a few cycles at run time. And it may help the compiler generate better code because it knows that all cases are covered. Remember that it is obvious to you that (a `rem` b) == 0 || (a `rem` b) /= 0 but the compiler could really have a hard time figuring this out in the general case. Hence, the compiler writer, knowing that the problem is not generally solvable, might have decided not to check guard completeness at all.

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The obvious improvement (after improving the input reading by using ByteStrings or Text) is to avoid div and mod and instead use quot and rem. div and mod have nicer behaviour when dealing with negative numbers, but are considerably slower than quot and rem which are translated the usual machine division and remainder instructions.

Some more strictness is also likely to help, but since the optimiser is pretty good, it's not a priori obvious where that doesn't already makes your programme use raw machine Int#s.

Regarding style, don't let your code wander so far right, and give type signatures at least to all top-level functions.

share|improve this answer
    
While adding type signatures you might also want to specialize them to Ints (I assume the Int range is sufficient for your problem). For example currently the type of subsolve is inferred to be subsolve :: Integral t => t -> [t] -> t -> t -> t -> t. This is likely to be less efficient than subsolve :: Int -> [Int] -> Int -> Int -> Int -> Int –  Grzegorz Chrupała Mar 5 '12 at 22:37
    
Since it's not exported and the result of read is given type Int, in fact everything gets type Int here - when compiled with optimisations, at least. In general, though it's good advice to stick to Int if that suffices and performance is important. –  Daniel Fischer Mar 5 '12 at 22:45

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