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def donuts(count):
  strout = 'Number of donuts %s'
  if count >= 10:
    %s('many')
  else:
    %s(str(count))
  return strout

I got SyntaxError: invalid syntax.

Of course you can do

def donuts(count):
  if count < 10:
    return 'Number of donuts: ' + str(count)
  else:
    return 'Number of donuts: many'

But just want to ues %, how would this work? Thanks!

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can anybody tell me why this question got down voted? Highly appreciated~ –  sammiwei Mar 5 '12 at 22:19
    
this question does not show any research effort,, google.com/search?q=python+percent –  Aprillion Mar 6 '12 at 9:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

howbout:

def donuts(count):
  somedonuts = 'Number of donuts %s'
  if count >= 10:
    somedonuts %= 'many'
  else:
    somedonuts %= str(count)
  return somedonuts
  1. don't use str for variables, that's already a builtin name (which you colided with in your own code!) Check dir(__builtins__) at the python prompt for the full list.
  2. use %= which formats the string and replaces the variable with the formatted result.
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For python 2.6+ or 3.0+ use http://docs.python.org/library/stdtypes.html#str.format:

mystr = "Number of donuts: {}"
...
mystr = mystr.format(count)
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And you can do stuff like mystr = "number of donuts: {0}. Number of coffees: {1}".format(donut_count, coffee_count) –  pycoder112358 Mar 5 '12 at 22:52
def donuts(count):
  format_str = 'Number of donuts %s'
  if count >= 10:
    return format_str % 'many'
  else:
    return format_str % count

P.S. Don't name a variable str - there's already a built-in Python function called str; shadowing it by naming a variable that can lead to madness.

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def donuts(count):
    if count >= 10:
      resp = 'many'
    else:
      resp = count
    strout = 'Number of donuts %s' %resp
    return strout
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String interpolation is the modulus of the string and a tuple (although a single value can be used if it is not a tuple).

mystr % ('many',)
mystr % (count,)
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The % is a binary operator. The left operand should be a string and the right operand should be a tuple with the same number of elements as there are format specifiers in the string (a scalar value will work if there is only one format specifier). In your case you can use it like this:

def donuts(count):
    return 'Number of donuts %s' % ('many' if count >= 10 else count)

Check the documentation for more information.

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