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Can you hook the opening of the DATA handle for a module while Perl is still compiling? And by that I mean is there a way that I can insert code that will run after Perl has opened the DATA glob for reading but before the compilation phase has ceased.

Failing that, can you at least see the raw text after __DATA__ before the compiler opens it up?


In response to Ikegami, on recent scripts that I have been working on, I have been using __DATA__ section + YAML syntax to configure the script. I've also been building up a vocabulary of YAML configuration handlers where the behavior is requested by use-ing the modules. And in some scripts that are quick-n-dirty, but not quite enough to forgo strict, I wanted to see if I could expose variables from the YAML specification.

It's been slightly annoying though just saving data in the import subs and then waiting for an INIT block to process the YAML. But it's been doable.

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What do you mean by "hook[ing] the opening"? –  Jack Maney Mar 5 '12 at 22:22
    
@JackManey, see revised question. –  Axeman Mar 5 '12 at 22:30
    
Hmmm...there's no way of doing that that I know of. The closest thing that comes to mind is to have another script open up your original script (ie the one with the DATA in it), grab the lines after __DATA__, and then do what needs to be done before running the original script. It'd probably work (depending on exactly what you want to do with reading the stuff after __DATA__ before running the original script), but it's a bit hacky... –  Jack Maney Mar 5 '12 at 22:34
    
Does what you are doing have to happen at BEGIN time? Could INIT or CHECK or one of the other blocks before runtime work? If so, you could just add one of those anywhere and put your processing of the *DATA handle there. –  Eric Strom Mar 5 '12 at 22:38
    
@EricStrom, I tried CHECK, 'INIT` and even UNITCHECK blocks, but they didn't work. –  Axeman Mar 6 '12 at 2:44

6 Answers 6

The file handle in DATA is none other than the handle the parser uses to read the code found before __DATA__. If that code is still being compiled, then __DATA__ hasn't been reached, then the handle hasn't been stored in DATA.

You could do something like the following instead:

open(my $data_fh, '<', \<<'__EOI__');
.
. Hunk of text readable via $data_fh
.
__EOI__
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There are other possible workarounds, but you didn't state what you're trying to do. –  ikegami Mar 5 '12 at 22:43

I don’t know where you want the hook. Probably in UNITCHECK.

use warnings;

sub i'm {
    print "in @_\n";
    print scalar <DATA>;
}

BEGIN       { i'm "BEGIN" }
UNITCHECK   { i'm "UNITCHECK" }
CHECK       { i'm "CHECK" }
INIT        { i'm "INIT" }
END         { i'm "END" }

i'm "main";
exit;

__END__
Data line one.
Data line two.
Data line three.
Data line four.
Data line five.
Data line six.

Produces this when run:

in BEGIN
readline() on unopened filehandle DATA at /tmp/d line 5.
in UNITCHECK
Data line one.
in CHECK
Data line two.
in INIT
Data line three.
in main
Data line four.
in END
Data line five.
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1  
Stoopeed StackOverflow syntax highlighter can’t even parse Perl. –  tchrist Mar 5 '12 at 22:46
2  
Only perl can parse Perl. –  mob Mar 5 '12 at 22:56
    
The old package/namespace separator is spooky, and using it like that is just evil. I wholeheartedly approve. –  kbenson Mar 5 '12 at 23:09
1  
@mob, This isn't an instance where determining syntax requires running code. –  ikegami Mar 5 '12 at 23:14
    
UNITCHECK doesn't help me break enough rules. :). I mainly use INIT blocks for things that can't be handled in during compilation. –  Axeman Mar 6 '12 at 2:50

You can use any of the before runtime but after compilation blocks to change the *DATA handle. Here is a short example using INIT to change *DATA to uc.

while (<DATA>) {
    print;
}

INIT {  # after compile time, so DATA is opened, but before runtime.
    local $/;
    my $file = uc <DATA>;
    open *DATA, '<', \$file;
}

__DATA__
hello,
world!

prints:

HELLO,
WORLD!

Which one of the blocks to use depends on other factors in your program. More detail about the various timed blocks can be found on the perlmod manpage.

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I'm afraid not, if I got your question right. It's written in The Doc:

Note that you cannot read from the DATA filehandle in a BEGIN block: the BEGIN block is executed as soon as it is seen (during compilation), at which point the corresponding DATA (or END) token has not yet been seen.

There's another way, though: read the file with DATA section as a normal text file, parse this section, then require the script file itself (which will be done at run-time). Don't know whether it'll be relevant in your case. )

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perlmod says:

CHECK code blocks are run just after the initial Perl compile phase ends and before the run time begins, in LIFO order.

May be you are looking for something like this?

CHECK {
    say "Reading from <DATA> ...";
    while (<DATA>) {
        print;
        $main::count++;
    };
}

say "Read $main::count lines from <DATA>";

__DATA__
1
2
3
4
5

This produces the following output:

Reading from <DATA> ...
1
2
3
4
5
Read 5 lines from <DATA>
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1  
UNITCHECK would surely be better than CHECK. –  ikegami Mar 5 '12 at 22:45
    
@ikegami: Could you explain how UNITCHECK is better than CHECK? Is that a general statement, or applicable in the context of this question? –  Prakash K Mar 6 '12 at 14:44
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found out that ::STDIN actually gives me access to the stream '-'. And that I can save the current location, through tell( $inh ) and then seek() it when I'm done.

By using that method, I could read the __DATA__ section in the import sub!

sub import { 
    my ( $caller, $file ) = ( caller 0 )[0,1];
    my $yaml;
    if ( $file eq '-' ) {
        my $place = tell( ::STDIN );
        local $RS;
        $yaml  = <::STDIN>;
        seek( ::STDIN, $place, 0 );
    }
    else { 
        open( my $inh, '<', $file );
        local $_ = '';
        while ( defined() and !m/^__DATA__$/ ) { $_ = <$inh>; }
        local $RS;
        $yaml = <$inh>;
        close $inh;
    }        
    if ( $yaml ) { 
        my ( $config ) = YAML::XS::Load( $yaml );;
        no strict 'refs';
        while ( my ( $n, $v ) = each %$config ) { 
            *{"$caller\::$n"} = ref $v ? $v : \$v;
        }
    }    
    return;
}

This worked on Strawberry Perl 5.16.2, so I don't know how portable this is. But right now, to me, this is working.

Just a background. I used to do a bit of programming with Windows Script Files. One thing I liked about the wsf format was that you could specify globally useful objects outside of the code. <object id="xl" progid="Application.Excel" />. I have always liked the look of programming by specification and letting some modular handler sort the data out. Now I can get a similar behavior through a YAML handler: excel: !ActiveX: Excel.Application.

This works for me.

The test is here, in case you're interested:

use strict;
use warnings;
use English qw<$RS>;
use Test::More;

use data_mayhem; # <-- that's my module.

is( $k, 'Excel.Application' );
is( $l[1], 'two' );

{   local $RS;
    my $data = <DATA>;
    isnt( $data, '' );
    say $data
}

done_testing;

__DATA__
---
k : !ActiveX Excel.Application
l : 
  - one
  - two
  - three
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