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I want to print the content of a JavaScript object in a string format like when we alert a variable.

The same formatted way I want to print an object.

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6  
Would you please reword your question? What do you mean by "formatted way"? As in, with rich formatting, like bold/italic/etc? –  Sasha Chedygov Jun 5 '09 at 19:03

16 Answers 16

up vote 351 down vote accepted

If you want to print the object for debugging purposes, I suggest instead installing Firebug for Firefox and using the code:

console.log(obj)
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25  
That function also works on Google Chrome when using the JavaScript Console (Shift+Control+J or Shift+Control+I, depending on the Chrome version). Also note that console.log(obj1, obj2) works very nicely, too, so you don't have to call console.log() for every object when logging multiple variables. Also, always remember to remove all such calls in production, as it will break browsers that do not implement it (such as Internet Explorer). –  Felix Apr 22 '10 at 9:31
123  
This does not work it prints [object Object] –  Doug Molineux Dec 13 '10 at 21:17
50  
Yes it prints [object Object] but it has a little expando-toggly button beside it that lets you inspect the contents of the object. –  hughes Jul 5 '11 at 13:46
8  
@hughes it actually can do both. i have an object i created with: var obj = { "foo" : false }; and another object that is being passed into a callback from a server, the one passed through the callback prints with the little arrow so you can open it up, the statically created one just prints [object Object] with no arrow. I'm trying to figure this out too, any other thoughts? –  benstraw Jul 8 '11 at 0:08
29  
console.log("id:"+obj); won't output correctly as it outputs a string as you see it there, you need to specify it like this: console.log("id:"); console.log(obj); –  Anriëtte Myburgh Mar 5 '13 at 11:06

Use JSON.stringify(obj); Also this method works with nested objects.

Edit: As suggested by Ben use JSON.stringify(obj, null, 4); for indented output.


Edit (17/02/2014): Use a custom JSON.stringify replacer if you encounter this Javascript error

"Uncaught TypeError: Converting circular structure to JSON"

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2  
that's how I do it too. console.log only works, ehu, in a console! –  Stefano Dec 17 '10 at 13:50
161  
For more readable output try JSON.stringify(obj, null, 4). This'll write it out as neatly indented text –  Ben Clayton Jun 5 '11 at 12:49
2  
Thanks, was trying to print out a complex, dynamic object to use as test data, and this saved me from having to create it manually. –  Jon Nov 1 '11 at 5:14
1  
JSON.stringify can only show a small subset of javascript values, and will throw an exception for the rest - console.log does not have this problem. –  Marc Lehmann Oct 1 '13 at 13:46
2  
If you are a newbie like me, don't forget console.log i.e. console.log(JSON.stringify(obj,null, 4)); –  nilesh Dec 30 '13 at 3:49
var output = '';
for (var property in object) {
  output += property + ': ' + object[property]+'; ';
}
alert(output);
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1  
I was looking for a php style foreach() thanks! –  DavidYell Oct 18 '10 at 15:14
1  
This is what exactly i want. I am using google maps v3 and the directionrenderer returns an object. That has four items and in that one objects name keeps changing so we need to find that. For that this method really helped. Besides this way we can get all the names of the properties and objects. Or is there any other way to find the names of the objects and properties? –  Jayapal Chandran Apr 28 '11 at 14:08
12  
+1, not all javascript is run in browsers or can be debugged in them. –  Bill Yang Jul 25 '11 at 2:19
2  
You probably want to mask out the built in cruft with hasOwnProperty most of the time. –  John Apr 20 '12 at 0:58
    
Atlast I got an answer which really helped, rest, used stringify and all weird things which complicated the process. –  Mr. Alien May 31 at 18:27

Well, Firefox (thanks to @Bojangles for detailed information) has Object.toSource() method which prints objects as JSON and function(){}.

That's enough for most debugging purposes, I guess.

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3  
Object.toSource() doesn't seem to work for Chrome, is this expected? Or does Chrome not fall under "advanced browsers"? =) –  tstyle Feb 13 '11 at 12:10
    
Obviously it doesn't :( –  alamar Feb 24 '11 at 13:32
33  
Old thread, just found it through Google. .toSource() is actually Firefox only. Just thought I'd let you know. –  Bojangles Aug 26 '11 at 12:14

If you want to use alert, to print your object, you can do this:

alert("myObject is " + myObject.toSource());

It should print each property and its corresponding value in string format.

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6  
toSource() doesn't work in non-gecko browsers (e.g. Chrome, Safari) –  Yarin Mar 7 '11 at 18:59
2  
However this works fine for Firefox (Gecko) Browsers COOL !!!! –  Vinothkumar Arputharaj Jul 5 '11 at 13:18

Function:

var print = function(o){
    var str='';

    for(var p in o){
        if(typeof o[p] == 'string'){
            str+= p + ': ' + o[p]+'; </br>';
        }else{
            str+= p + ': { </br>' + print(o[p]) + '}';
        }
    }

    return str;
}

Usage:

var myObject = {
    name: 'Wilson Page',
    contact: {
        email: 'wilson@hotmail.com',
        tel: '123456789'
    }  
}

$('body').append( print(myObject) );

Example:

http://jsfiddle.net/WilsonPage/6eqMn/

share|improve this answer

Use this:

console.log('print object: ' + JSON.stringify(session));
share|improve this answer

In NodeJS you can print an object by using util.inspect(obj). Be sure to state the depth or you'll only have a shallow print of the object. http://nodejs.org/api/util.html#util_util_inspect_object_options

share|improve this answer
    
Question does not mention NodeJS, clutters the flow (esp. with the 6, now 5 ;-)) up-votes –  Morten Bergfall Jul 20 at 15:41
    
Well, A) NodeJS in a platform that uses JavaScript B) the environment is not stated in the question and C) there seems to be others that find the answer somewhat useful by indication of up-votes. But, whatever you say captain ;) –  Lander Jul 22 at 11:10
    
@Lander Your absolutely correct, your answer adds value and clutters nothing –  Alex Nov 24 at 16:38

I needed a way to recursively print the object, which pagewil's answer provided (Thanks!). I updated it a little bit to include a way to print up to a certain level, and to add spacing so that it is properly indented based on the current level that we are in so that it is more readable.

// Recursive print of object
var print = function( o, maxLevel, level ) {
    if ( typeof level == "undefined" ) {
        level = 0;
    }
    if ( typeof level == "undefined" ) {
        maxLevel = 0;
    }

    var str = '';
    // Remove this if you don't want the pre tag, but make sure to remove
    // the close pre tag on the bottom as well
    if ( level == 0 ) {
        str = '<pre>';
    }

    var levelStr = '';
    for ( var x = 0; x < level; x++ ) {
        levelStr += '    ';
    }

    if ( maxLevel != 0 && level >= maxLevel ) {
        str += levelStr + '...</br>';
        return str;
    }

    for ( var p in o ) {
        if ( typeof o[p] == 'string' ) {
            str += levelStr +
                p + ': ' + o[p] + ' </br>';
        } else {
            str += levelStr +
                p + ': { </br>' + print( o[p], maxLevel, level + 1 ) + levelStr + '}</br>';
        }
    }

    // Remove this if you don't want the pre tag, but make sure to remove
    // the open pre tag on the top as well
    if ( level == 0 ) {
        str += '</pre>';
    }
    return str;
};

Usage:

var pagewilsObject = {
    name: 'Wilson Page',
    contact: {
        email: 'wilson@hotmail.com',
        tel: '123456789'
    }  
}

// Recursive of whole object
$('body').append( print(pagewilsObject) ); 

// Recursive of myObject up to 1 level, will only show name 
// and that there is a contact object
$('body').append( print(pagewilsObject, 1) ); 
share|improve this answer

Reinventing the wheel here! None of these solutions worked for my situation. So, I quickly doctored up pagewil's answer. This one is not for printing to screen (via console, or textfield or whatever). It is, however, for data transport. This version seems to return a very similar result as toSource(). I've not tried JSON.stringify, but I assume this is about the same thing. The result of this function is a valid Javascript object declaration.

I wouldn't doubt if something like this was already on SO somewhere, but it was just shorter to make it than to spend a while searching past answers. And since this question was my top hit on google when I started searching about this; I figured putting it here might help others.

Anyhow, the result from this function will be a string representation of your object, even if your object has embedded objects and arrays, and even if those objects or arrays have even further embedded objects and arrays. (I heard you like to drink? So, I pimped your car with a cooler, and then I pimped your cooler a cooler so your cooler can drink while your being cool.)

Arrays are stored with [] instead of {} and thus dont have key/value pairs, just values. Like regular arrays. Therefore, they get created like arrays do.

Also, all string (including key names) are quoted, this is not necessary unless those strings have special characters (like a space or a slash). But, I didn't feel like detecting this just to remove some quotes that would otherwise still work fine.

This resulting string can then be used with eval or just dumping it into a var thru string manipulation. Thus, re-creating your object again, from text.

function ObjToSource(o){
    if (!o) return 'null';
    var k="",na=typeof(o.length)=="undefined"?1:0,str="";
    for(var p in o){
        if (na) k = "'"+p+ "':";
        if (typeof o[p] == "string") str += k + "'" + o[p]+"',";
        else if (typeof o[p] == "object") str += k + ObjToSource(o[p])+",";
        else str += k + o[p] + ",";
    }
    if (na) return "{"+str.slice(0,-1)+"}";
    else return "["+str.slice(0,-1)+"]";
}

Let me know if I messed it all up, works fine in my testing. Also, the only way I could think of to detect type array was to check for the presence of length. Because Javascript really stores arrays as objects, I cant actually check for type array (there is no such type!). If anyone else knows a better way, I would love to hear it. Because, if your object also has a property named length then this function will mistakenly treat it as an array.

EDIT: Added check for null valued objects. Thanks Brock Adams

EDIT: Below is the fixed function to be able to print infinitely recursive objects. This does not print the same as toSource from FF because toSource will print the infinite recursion one time, where as, this function will kill it immediately. This function runs slower, so I'm adding it here instead of editing the above function, as its only needed if you plan to pass objects that link back to themselves, somewhere.

function ObjToSource(o){
    if (!o) return 'null';
    if (typeof(o) == "object") {
        if (!ObjToSource.check) ObjToSource.check = new Array();
        for (var i=0, k=ObjToSource.check.length ; i<k ; ++i) {
            if (ObjToSource.check[i] == o) {return '{}';}
        }
        ObjToSource.check.push(o);
    }
    var k="",na=typeof(o.length)=="undefined"?1:0,str="";
    for(var p in o){
        if (na) k = "'"+p+ "':";
        if (typeof o[p] == "string") str += k + "'" + o[p]+"',";
        else if (typeof o[p] == "object") str += k + ObjToSource(o[p])+",";
        else str += k + o[p] + ",";
    }
    if (typeof(o) == "object") ObjToSource.check.pop();
    if (na) return "{"+str.slice(0,-1)+"}";
    else return "["+str.slice(0,-1)+"]";
}

Test:

var test1 = new Object();
test1.foo = 1;
test1.bar = 2;

var testobject = new Object();
testobject.run = 1;
testobject.fast = null;
testobject.loop = testobject;
testobject.dup = test1;

console.log(ObjToSource(testobject));
console.log(testobject.toSource());

Result:

{'run':1,'fast':null,'loop':{},'dup':{'foo':1,'bar':2}}
({run:1, fast:null, loop:{run:1, fast:null, loop:{}, dup:{foo:1, bar:2}}, dup:{foo:1, bar:2}})

NOTE: Trying to print document.body is a terrible example. For one, FF just prints an empty object string when using toSource. And when using the function above, FF crashes on SecurityError: The operation is insecure.. And Chrome will crash on Uncaught RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded. Clearly, document.body was not meant to be converted to string. Because its either too large, or against security policy to access certain properties. Unless, I messed something up here, do tell!

share|improve this answer
    
Crash prone. Try ObjToSource(document.body), for example. –  Brock Adams Dec 28 '12 at 22:34
    
ok, I found the issue. I was not checking for null valued objects. That is fixed now. But, you still cant do ObjToSource(document.body) because of infinite recursion. Even document.body.toSource() in FireFox returns an empty object. –  Pimp Trizkit Dec 28 '12 at 23:35
    
@BrockAdams - There now its fixed for infinite recursion, however document.body is still not printable. See NOTE. –  Pimp Trizkit Dec 29 '12 at 1:57
    
document.body was just a shortcut to pointing out some big problems. You've now fixed the worst of those and I already upvoted. (Although, I do believe that a different approach could handle document.body. Most of the answers here would not do well against it either.) –  Brock Adams Dec 29 '12 at 2:17
    
Well, if you (or anyone else) got any ideas of how to get past the fact that such a large object will fill up the stack during recursion or bypass security restrictions. I would love to hear it. Thanks for the vote! –  Pimp Trizkit Dec 29 '12 at 2:21

console.dir(object):

"Displays an interactive listing of the properties of a specified JavaScript object. This listing lets you use disclosure triangles to examine the contents of child objects."

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i used pagewil's print method, and it worked very nicely.

here is my slightly extended version with (sloppy) indents and distinct prop/ob delimiters:

var print = function(obj, delp, delo, ind){
    delp = delp!=null ? delp : "\t"; // property delimeter
    delo = delo!=null ? delo : "\n"; // object delimeter
    ind = ind!=null ? ind : " "; // indent; ind+ind geometric addition not great for deep objects
    var str='';

    for(var prop in obj){
        if(typeof obj[prop] == 'string' || typeof obj[prop] == 'number'){
          var q = typeof obj[prop] == 'string' ? "" : ""; // make this "'" to quote strings
          str += ind + prop + ': ' + q + obj[prop] + q + '; ' + delp;
        }else{
          str += ind + prop + ': {'+ delp + print(obj[prop],delp,delo,ind+ind) + ind + '}' + delo;
        }
    }
    return str;
};
share|improve this answer

As it was said before best and most simply way i found was

var getPrintObject=function(object)
{
    return JSON.stringify(object);
}
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I wanted to do something like this, so I wrote a little bit of code to turn javascript objects into HTML which can be put on a page, and which provides you with some ability to explore the objects rendered.

You can see it here. Or get the source here.

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It seems that a simple for...in can't solve the problem especially when we want to tackle apart from custom, host , native or CSSOM objects. Besides, we are talking about debugging here and who knows when and where we'll need it!

My small library can handle objects like this one:

    obj2
     |__ foo = 'bar'
     |__ loop2 = obj2
     |            :
     |__ another = obj1
                    |__ a1 = 1
                    |__ b1 = 'baz'
                    |__ loop1 = obj1
                    |            :
                    |__ c1 = true
                    |__ d1 = ''
                    |__ e1 = [1,2,3]

and present them colorful and with identation like:

  1. 0, foo, 'bar'
  2. 0, loop2, 'contains a circular reference to object at index 0'
  3. 0, another, 'object'
  4. 1, a1, 1
  5. 1, b1, 'baz'
  6. 1, loop1, 'contains a circular reference to object at index 2'
  7. 1, c1, 'true'
  8. 1, d1, ''
  9. 1, e1, [1,2,3]

but see there:

  1. https://github.com/centurianii/jsdebug
  2. http://jsfiddle.net/centurianii/92Cmk/36/

With some precautions even document.body is parsed!

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You may use my function .
Call this function with an array or string or an object it alerts the contents.

Function

function print_r(printthis, returnoutput) {
    var output = '';

    if($.isArray(printthis) || typeof(printthis) == 'object') {
        for(var i in printthis) {
            output += i + ' : ' + print_r(printthis[i], true) + '\n';
        }
    }else {
        output += printthis;
    }
    if(returnoutput && returnoutput == true) {
        return output;
    }else {
        alert(output);
    }
}

Usage

var data = [1, 2, 3, 4];
print_r(data);
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