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Say I have a multiple inheritance scenario:

class A(object):
    # code for A here

class B(object):
    # code for B here

class C(A,B):
    def __init__(self):
        # What's the right code to write here to ensure 
        # A.__init__ and B.__init__ get called?

There's two typical approaches to writing C's __init__:

  1. (old-style) ParentClass.__init__(self)
  2. (newer-style) super(DerivedClass, self).__init__()

However, in either case, if the parent classes (A and B) don't follow the same convention, then the code will not work correctly (some may be missed, or get called multiple times).

So what's the correct way again? It's easy to say "just be consistent, follow one or the other", but if A or B are from a 3rd party library, what then? Is there an approach that can ensure that all parent class constructors get called (and in the correct order, and only once)?

Edit: to see what I mean, if I do:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "entering A"
        super(A, self).__init__()
        print "leaving A"

class B(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "entering B"
        super(B, self).__init__()
        print "leaving B"

class C(A,B):
    def __init__(self):
        print "entering c"
        A.__init__(self)
        B.__init__(self)
        print "leaving c"

Then I get:

entering c
entering A
entering B
leaving B
leaving A
entering B
leaving B
leaving c

Note that B's init gets called twice. If I do:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "entering A"
        print "leaving A"

class B(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "entering B"
        super(B, self).__init__()
        print "leaving B"

class C(A,B):
    def __init__(self):
        print "entering c"
        super(C, self).__init__()
        print "leaving c"

Then I get:

entering c
entering A
leaving A
leaving c

Note that B's init never gets called. So it seems that unless I know/control the init's of the classes I inherit from (A and B) I cannot make a safe choice for the class I'm writing (C).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Both ways work fine. The approach using super() leads to greater flexibility for subclasses.

In the direct call approach, C.__init__ can call both A.__init__ and B.__init__.

When using super(), the classes need to be designed for cooperative multiple inheritance where C calls super, which invokes A's code which will also call super which invokes B's code. See http://rhettinger.wordpress.com/2011/05/26/super-considered-super for more detail on what can be done with super.

[Response question as later edited]

So it seems that unless I know/control the init's of the classes I inherit from (A and B) I cannot make a safe choice for the class I'm writing (C).

The referenced article shows how to handle this situation by adding a wrapper class around A and B. There is a worked-out example in the section titled "How to Incorporate a Non-cooperative Class".

One might wish that multiple inheritance were easier, letting you effortlessly compose Car and Airplane classes to get a FlyingCar, but the reality is that separately designed components often need adapters or wrappers before fitting together as seemlessly as we would like :-)

One other thought: if you're unhappy with composing functionality using multiple inheritance, you can use composition for complete control over which methods get called on which occasions.

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No, they don't. If B's init doesn't call super, then B's init will not be called if we do the super().__init__() approach. If I call A.__init__() and B.__init__() directly, then (if A and B do call super) I get B's init being called multiple times. –  Adam Parkin Mar 5 '12 at 23:07
    
@AdamParkin To use super() with multiple inheritance, the classes need to be designed for cooperative multiple inheritance using the principles outlined in the the article. Your other choice is to let C call both A and B's code directly. –  Raymond Hettinger Mar 5 '12 at 23:12
    
@AdamParkin (regarding your question as edited): If one of the parent classes isn't designed for use with super(), it can usually be wrapped in a way that adds the super call. The referenced article shows a worked-out example in the section titled "How to Incorporate a Non-cooperative Class". –  Raymond Hettinger Mar 5 '12 at 23:36
    
Somehow I managed to miss that section when I read the article. Exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  Adam Parkin Mar 6 '12 at 16:59
    
Of course, the adapter approach means you now need to replicate the interface of the class you're inheriting from in the adapter. Ick, but safe. –  Adam Parkin Mar 6 '12 at 17:31

If you are multiply sub-classing classes from third party libraries, then no, there is no blind approach to calling the base class __init__ methods (or any other methods) that actually works regardless of how the base classes are programmed.

super makes it possible to write classes designed to cooperatively implement methods as part of complex multiple inheritance trees which need not be known to the class author. But there's no way to use it to correctly inherit from arbitrary classes that may or may use super.

Essentially, whether a class is designed to be sub-classed using super or with direct calls to the base class is a property which is part of the class' "public interface", and it should be documented as such. If you're using third-party libraries in the way that the library author expected and the library has reasonable documentation, it would normally tell you what you are required to do to subclass particular things. If not, then you'll have to look at the source code for the classes you're sub-classing and see what their base-class-invocation convention is. If you're combining multiple classes from one or more third-party libraries in a way that the library authors didn't expect, then it may not be possible to consistently invoke super-class methods at all; if class A is part of a hierarchy using super and class B is part of a hierarchy that doesn't use super, then neither option is guaranteed to work. You'll have to figure out a strategy that happens to work for each particular case.

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@RaymondHettinger Well, you already wrote and linked to an article with some thoughts about that in your answer, so I don't think I have much to add to that. :) I don't think it's possible to generically adapt any non-super-using class to a super-hierarchy though; you have to come up with a solution tailored to the particular classes involved. –  Ben Mar 6 '12 at 4:27

This article helps to explain cooperative multiple inheritance:

http://www.artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=281127

It mentions the useful method mro() that shows you the method resolution order. In your 2nd example, where you call super in A, the super call continues on in MRO. The next class in the order is B, this is why B's init is called the first time.

Here's a more technical article from the official python site:

http://www.python.org/download/releases/2.3/mro/

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