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I have n lists of numbers. I want to make sure that each list contains unique elements to that particular list. I.e. There are no "shared" duplicates across any of the rest.
This is really easy to do with two lists, but a little trickier with n lists.

e.g.   
mylist = [
[1, 2, 3, 4],
[2, 5, 6, 7],
[4, 2, 8, 9]
]

becomes:

mylist = [
[1, 3],
[5, 6, 7],
[8, 9]
]
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4  
Why is 2 not in any of the three lists, whereas 4 is still present in the first list? –  Praveen Gollakota Mar 5 '12 at 23:03
1  
Do you care if order is preserved? –  wim Mar 5 '12 at 23:06
    
Use a bag (default_dict) to build a "seen" list. Replace each list of mylist (I'll call it sublist) with a generator that looks for a matching seen: if found, don't include it in the final sublist. If not found, add it to the bag. –  Droogans Mar 5 '12 at 23:13
    
order doesn't matter :) –  LittleBobbyTables Mar 5 '12 at 23:14
    
what is your expected output for mylist = [[1, 2, 2], [3]] ? –  wim Mar 5 '12 at 23:49
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
from collections import Counter
from itertools import chain

mylist = [
    [1,2,3,4],
    [2,5,6,7,7],
    [4,2,8,9]
]

counts = Counter(chain(*map(set,mylist)))

[[i for i in sublist if counts[i]==1] for sublist in mylist]
#[[1, 3], [5, 6, 7, 7], [8, 9]]
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This is really nice, but I would prefer not to have to import Counter and chain I guess as this might slightly reduce the running time (?). –  LittleBobbyTables Mar 5 '12 at 23:27
    
!!! I was looking for a way to do chain(*mylist) in my answer in an elegant way. Very nice. Oops, and I don't even need .get() like in my answer because of course it'll always be defined. I'm deleting my answer because yours is almost exactly the same but strictly better. –  ninjagecko Mar 5 '12 at 23:29
2  
@MatthewRNYC: you should not be afraid of using basic collections like this answer suggests. Additionally I can see no reason that chain and the Counter constructor would not both be O(N). –  ninjagecko Mar 5 '12 at 23:31
2  
It does not preserve duplicates in one list though. –  Felix Kling Mar 5 '12 at 23:42
1  
@FelixKling: I just realized this and fixed dugres's answer. The trick is to count numbers at most once from each list (map(set,mylist) rather than mylist). –  ninjagecko Mar 6 '12 at 3:45
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This does it in linear time, 2 passes. I'm assuming you want to preserve duplicates within a list; if not, this can be simplified a bit:

>>> import collections, itertools
>>> counts = collections.defaultdict(int)
>>> for i in itertools.chain.from_iterable(set(l) for l in mylist):
...     counts[i] += 1
... 
>>> for l in mylist:
...     l[:] = (i for i in l if counts[i] == 1)
... 
>>> mylist
[[1, 3], [5, 6, 7], [8, 9]]
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This leaves in items seen once, not sure if the OP wants that.. –  wim Mar 5 '12 at 23:12
    
@wim, thanks, fixed. –  senderle Mar 5 '12 at 23:25
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Since you don't care about order, you can easily remove duplicates using set subtraction and converting back to list. Here it is in a monster one-liner:

>>> mylist = [
... [1, 2, 3, 4],
... [2, 5, 6, 7],
... [4, 2, 8, 9]
... ]
>>> mynewlist = [list(set(thislist) - set(element for sublist in mylist for element in sublist if sublist is not thislist)) for thislist in mylist]
>>> mynewlist
[[1, 3], [5, 6, 7], [8, 9]]

Note: This is not very efficient because duplicates are recomputed for each row. Whether this is a problem or not depends on your data size.

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1  
This is a beast! :) –  LittleBobbyTables Mar 5 '12 at 23:27
    
Looks like an expensive operation though. If you have n lists with m elements each you have something like O(n * n-1 * m) (that's only for iterating over each element of each sublist). Or am I wrong? –  Felix Kling Mar 5 '12 at 23:32
    
Unfortunately I have to -1: this recalculates all duplicates for each list, resulting in roughly O(N^(3/2)) work assuming the number of sublists is like sqrt(N). Nor does it preserve the order of a list (though if the lists were sorted, you could re-sort them, at a cost of a multiplicative O(log(sublistN)) factor extra). I would personally go with the Counter solution which I believe is O(N). –  ninjagecko Mar 5 '12 at 23:36
    
That is true. I guess I should choose the faster one :/ –  LittleBobbyTables Mar 5 '12 at 23:41
    
True, it is not efficient - I will add a disclaimer to the answer. But is that a problem? I am always in habit to ask "Does it need to be efficient?" before I ask "How can I make this more efficient?" –  wim Mar 5 '12 at 23:43
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This is my solution, using Counter to build a set of all the common numbers, and then it just does a set difference:

from collections import Counter

def disjoin(lsts):
    c = Counter(num for lst in lsts for num in lst)
    common = set(x for x,v in c.items() if v > 1)
    result = []
    for lst in lsts:
        result.append(set(lst) - common)
    return result

Example:

>>> remove_common(mylist)
[set([1, 3]), set([5, 6, 7]), set([8, 9])]
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set() is the right approach. although you don't have to use a list comprehension.

Without additional imports:

mylist = [
[1, 2, 3, 4],
[2, 5, 6, 7],
[4, 2, 8, 9]
]
>>> result_list = []
>>> for test_list in mylist:
...     result_set = set(test_list)
...     for compare_list in mylist:
...         if test_list != compare_list:
...             result_set = result_set - set(compare_list)
...     result_list.append(result_set)
...
>>> result_list
[set([1, 3]), set([5, 6, 7]), set([8, 9])]
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