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I am processing frames in a video and displaying it live (real time). The algorithm is fast, but I am wondering if there's any optimizations that I can do that will make it even more seamless. I don't know what functions in my algorithm take up the most amount of time, my guess is the sqrt() function because apparently it does some look ups, but i am not sure.

This is my algorithm:

IplImage *videoFrame = cvCreateImage(cvSize(bufferWidth, bufferHeight), IPL_DEPTH_8U, 4);
videoFrame->imageData = (char*)bufferBaseAddress;
int channels = videoFrame->nChannels;
int widthStep = videoFrame->widthStep;
int width = videoFrame->width;
int height = videoFrame->height;

for(int i=0;i<height;i++){

    uchar *col = ((uchar *)(videoFrame->imageData + i*widthStep));

    for(int j=0;j<width;j++){

        double pRed     = col[j*channels + 0];                      
        double pGreen   = col[j*channels + 1];       
        double pBlue    = col[j*channels + 2];       

        double dRed     = green.val[0] - pRed;
        double dGreen   = green.val[1] - pGreen;
        double dBlue    = green.val[2] - pBlue;

        double sDRed    = dRed * dRed;
        double sDGreen  = dGreen * dGreen;
        double sDBlue   = dBlue * dBlue;


        double sum = sDRed + sDGreen + sDBlue;

        double euc = sqrt(sum);
        //NSLog(@"%f %f %f", pRed, pGreen, pBlue);

        if (euc < threshold) {
            col[j*channels + 0] = white.val[0];
            col[j*channels + 1] = white.val[1];
            col[j*channels + 2] = white.val[2];
        }

    }
}

Thanks!

UPDATE Ok, so what this does is loop throughout every pixel in the image, and calculator the Euclidean distance between the color of the pixel and green color. So, overall this is a green screen algorithm.

I did some benchmarks, and the fps without using this algorithm is 30.0fps. Using this algorithm, it falls down to about 8fps. But, the majority of the for drop comes from col[j*channels + 0]; If the algorithm doesn't do anything else and use access the array elects, it drops down to about 10fps.

UPDATE 2 Ok this is interesting, I was removing random lines from the stuff inside the double loop to see what causes the bigger overhead and this is what I found: Creating variables on the stack causes HUGE drop in FPS. Consider this example:

for(int i=0;i<height;i++){

    uchar *col = ((uchar *)(data + i*widthStep));

    for(int j=0;j<width;j++){

        double pRed     = col[j*channels + 0];                      
        double pGreen   = col[j*channels + 1];       
        double pBlue    = col[j*channels + 2];       

    }
}

This drops the fps to 11-ish.

Now this on the other hand:

for(int i=0;i<height;i++){

    uchar *col = ((uchar *)(data + i*widthStep));

    for(int j=0;j<width;j++){

        col[j*channels + 0];                      
        col[j*channels + 1];       
        col[j*channels + 2];       

    }
}

doesn't drop the FPS at all! The FPS stays at a pretty 30.0. Thought I should update this and let you guys know what's this is the real bottle neck, making variables not he stack. I wonder if I inline everything I might get a pure 30.0fps.

Nvm...maybe the expressions that aren't assigned to a var aren't even evaluated.

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2  
Is there a reason you're asking this before profiling on your own? –  ildjarn Mar 5 '12 at 23:03
    
Search the web for "data driven design"; some of the articles tell how to optimize the processor's data and instruction caches. –  Thomas Matthews Mar 5 '12 at 23:18
1  
If I were doing this on a platform capable of it, and it made sense relative to the operations you perform before and after this operation, then I'd shift the computation to the GPU. –  sigfpe Mar 5 '12 at 23:21
    
2nd update...found something interesting... –  0xSina Mar 6 '12 at 3:14
2  
@PragmaOnce: Those expressions aren't evaluated since they have no side effects. –  Ben Voigt Mar 6 '12 at 13:19

8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

sqrt is a monotonically increasing function, and you appear to only be using it in a threshold test.

Due to monotonicity, sqrt(sum) < threshold is equivalent to sum < threshold * threshold (assuming threshold is positive).

No more expensive square root, and the compiler will move the multiplication outside the loop.


As a next step, you can remove the expensive multiply j * channels from inside the inner loop. The compiler should be smart enough to do it only once and use the result three times, but it's still a multiply that the rest of the calculation is dependent on, so hurts pipelining.

Remember that a multiply is the same as repeated addition? Normally doing more operations is more expensive, but in this case you already have the repetition part, due to the loop. So use:

for(int j=0;j<width;j++){
    double pRed     = col[0];
    double pGreen   = col[1];
    double pBlue    = col[2];

    double dRed     = green.val[0] - pRed;
    double dGreen   = green.val[1] - pGreen;
    double dBlue    = green.val[2] - pBlue;

    double sDRed    = dRed * dRed;
    double sDGreen  = dGreen * dGreen;
    double sDBlue   = dBlue * dBlue;


    double sum = sDRed + sDGreen + sDBlue;

    //NSLog(@"%f %f %f", pRed, pGreen, pBlue);

    if (sum < threshold * threshold) {
        col[0] = white.val[0];
        col[1] = white.val[1];
        col[2] = white.val[2];
    }

    col += channels;
}

Next, you have expensive conversions between uchar and double. These aren't needed for a threshold test:

int j = width;
do {
    int_fast16_t const pRed   = col[0];
    int_fast16_t const pGreen = col[1];
    int_fast16_t const pBlue  = col[2];

    int_fast32_t const dRed   = green.val[0] - pRed;
    int_fast32_t const dGreen = green.val[1] - pGreen;
    int_fast32_t const dBlue  = green.val[2] - pBlue;

    int_fast32_t const sDRed   = dRed * dRed;
    int_fast32_t const sDGreen = dGreen * dGreen;
    int_fast32_t const sDBlue  = dBlue * dBlue;

    int_fast32_t const sum = sDRed + sDGreen + sDBlue;

    //NSLog(@"%f %f %f", pRed, pGreen, pBlue);

    if (sum < threshold * threshold) {
        col[0] = white.val[0];
        col[1] = white.val[1];
        col[2] = white.val[2];
    }

    col += channels;
} while (--j);
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1  
I think is better to say set threshold *= threshold, in start, instead of computing threshold every-time. IF you change this your answer will be better than mine. –  Saeed Amiri Mar 5 '12 at 23:19
    
@Saeed: I think the compiler is smart enough to do that. –  Ben Voigt Mar 5 '12 at 23:20
    
IF he compile it in -O3 :) –  Saeed Amiri Mar 5 '12 at 23:25
    
@SaeedAmiri: This is one of the simplest and least expensive optimizations, I would be quite surprised if it wasn't included in -O1. –  Ben Voigt Mar 6 '12 at 13:14
    
+1 the sqrt() replacement tip is brilliant! –  user1222021 Mar 6 '12 at 21:18

Premature optimisation is always a bad thing - and if it's really necessary it needs to be backed by hard-evidence. For almost all circumstances, the compiler will do a good job of optimising the specifics of your code - it's your job to get the complexity down in the higher functions.

Rather than trying to optimise this specific bit of code, check first that you're performance isn't bottle-necking elsewhere in the program, and then check to see if you can avoid this function being called at all in the first place. Only once you're sure that there's nothing left to do but to optimise this code should you begin considering optimising this code.

If you really really really must optimise this code, the best way to do it would be using MMX and SIMD instructions to essentially vectorize all of the double "triples" into single instructions.

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This is a great next step after removing the square root. –  Ben Voigt Mar 5 '12 at 23:15

Well, without knowing what your algorithm does, if you want to improve it a little you can get rid of that sqrt call. Just replace:

double euc = sqrt(sum);

if (euc < threshold) {
    ....
}

By:

if (sum < threshold_2) {
    ....
}

Where threshold_2 equals threshold * threshold, which you can precalculate and take out of the loops.

That will give it a little performance boost, but don't expect too much.

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sqrt is quite slow. why don't you calculate double threshold_sq = threshold * threshold; before the outer loop and use sum < threshold_sq for comparison. Furthermore, the restrict keyword might or might not help you a bit.

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I would advise looking into something like Valgrind. It has a bunch of useful tests that can analyze practically every piece of your code.

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Given your comment that col[j*channels + 0]; is taking a lot of time: Is channels always 3? or even always 4? If so, you could avoid the offset math by just advancing the pointer, like this:

for(int i=0;i<height;i++){
   uchar *col = ((uchar *)(videoFrame->imageData + i*widthStep));   
   for(int j=0;j<width;j++){
      double dRed     = green.val[0] - *col++;   
      double dGreen   = green.val[1] - *col++;  
      double dBlue    = green.val[2] - *col++; 

   //math here

   if (euc < thresholdSqrd) {
     *(col-3) = white.val[0];
     *(col-2) = white.val[1];
     *(col-1) = white.val[2];
   }
   col++; //do this only if `channels`==4
}

Also, since your raw data seems to be rgb as consecutive bytes, you could set a pixel to white using *(int32_t*)(col-3) |= 0xFFFFFF;

And doing your subtraction as integers may be slightly faster (store green as ints):

      int16_t iRed     = green.val[0] - *col++;   
      int16_t iGreen   = green.val[1] - *col++;  
      int16_t iBlue    = green.val[2] - *col++; 
      double euc = (double)iRed*iRed + iGreen*iGreen + iBlue*iBlue;
share|improve this answer
    
AShelly, thanks for your input. I like the pointer arithmetic, I am using that now. But I found something very interesting, i'll update my original question. Kinda surprising.... –  0xSina Mar 6 '12 at 3:07

If you on Linux, take a look at oprofile and the utility perf (supplied with kernel source code).

BTW, the code in UPDATE2 likely doesn't do anything at all, it is compiled out, as the effects of the expessions are not stored anywhere. In such cases the compiler decides not to put it in the output at all. Compile the code with -S (assembler output) and take a look.

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You are using nested for loops but I don't see you using the variable from your outer loop at all. If what have written is in-fact correct, I would suggest you modify the outer for loop which would change your running time from O(n^2) to O(n).

share|improve this answer
    
He does use i to get the col pointer. –  Florian Mar 5 '12 at 23:10
    
Aah, you are right. But still, if height <= width he could include the cols in one loop right? –  noMAD Mar 5 '12 at 23:14
    
@noMAD: One loop can be used, but its complexity will be O(width * height), just like the nested loops. –  Ben Voigt Mar 5 '12 at 23:19
    
@BenVoigt: I don't agree in all the situations. Example, the one I mentioned above, you would just need O(width) –  noMAD Mar 6 '12 at 8:10
    
@noMAD: He's testing and updating width*height different pixels, there's no way to do that in O(width). –  Ben Voigt Mar 6 '12 at 13:16

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