Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

struct Printable abstract
{
 friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& cout, const Printable& obj)
 {
  obj.print(cout);

  return cout;
 }

 virtual void print(std::ostream& cout) const = 0;
};

struct VirtualBase abstract : public Printable
{
 //stuff
};

struct Named abstract : public Printable
{
 std::string name;

 void print(std::ostream& cout) const
 {
  cout << "Name: " << name;
 }
};

struct DerivedA : public VirtualBase
{
 void print(std::ostream& cout) const
 {
  cout << "DerivedA";
 }
};

struct DerivedB : public VirtualBase, public Named
{
 void print(std::ostream& cout) const
 {
  cout << "DerivedB";

  dynamic_cast<const Named*>(this)->print(cout);
  //Is there a better way to call Named::print?
 }
};

Since DerivedB inherits VirtualBase and Named, and both of those inherit Printable, I can't use DerivedB with cout. What would be the best way to have Printable support on multiple layers of the inheritance hierarchy? Also, what would be the simplest way to call Named::print in a derived class's print?

share|improve this question
    
What's with the abstract in your struct declarations? That isn't valid C++. –  David Brown Mar 5 '12 at 23:21
    
@DavidBrown: Unless he made it as a macro. –  Linuxios Mar 5 '12 at 23:24
    
@Linux Ah yes. If so you might want to include it in your code sample and making it all caps as is standard for macros to avoid confusion user173342. –  David Brown Mar 5 '12 at 23:29
    
Oh, it's for VC++ 2010. You can ignore the abstract if you want. –  user173342 Mar 5 '12 at 23:29
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is because DerivedB is a VirtualBase (which is a Printable), and a Named (which is a Printable), so the operator<< tries to convert DerivedB to a Printable, but can't downcast, because it is two Printable objects, and it doesn't know which to downcast to. Since you only want DerivedB to derive from one Printable object, you have to use virtual inheritance.

   normal inheritance:            virtual inheritance:
Printable      Printable                 Printable
   |               |                    /        \
VirtualBase      Named          VirtualBase      Named
       \         /                     \         /
        DerivedB                         DerivedB

Which is done simply:

struct Named abstract : virtual public Printable
struct VirtualBase abstract : virtual public Printable

Note that a class with virtual inheritance is larger and slightly slower than it would be without, but on the other hand, C++ is one of the very few languages that can do it at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Still gives me the C2594 ambiguity error with struct Named abstract : virtual public Printable, also tried putting a virtual for DerivedB's Named inheritance and still no go. –  user173342 Mar 6 '12 at 0:21
    
Ok, if I do virtual on both VirtualBase and Named for inheriting Printable, it compiles (and works right)! But it has to be both, not one like your example. –  user173342 Mar 6 '12 at 0:23
    
@user173342: I thought it only had to be one, but maybe my memory is off. Sorry about that! –  Mooing Duck Mar 6 '12 at 0:24
add comment

You just have to qualify which print you want to call with the scope resolution operator (::) like so:

Named::print(cout);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that solves one problem, but it still can't compile due to the ambiguity in DerivedB's Printable inheritance. –  user173342 Mar 5 '12 at 23:32
    
@user173342 It compiles fine for me. This seems to indicate however that C++/CLI does not support multiple inheritance like this. If you're targeting C++/CLI you should add that to your question. –  David Brown Mar 5 '12 at 23:37
    
I am not using the /clr tag (set to No Common Language Runtime Support)... Doesn't that cause VC++ 2010 to not use C++/CLI? –  user173342 Mar 5 '12 at 23:47
    
@user173342 I think so. I'm afraid I have little experience with VC++ however :( –  David Brown Mar 5 '12 at 23:56
    
DavidBrown: He's not using CLR, since he says he's not using the tag, and if he were, it would be a compile error. That being said, this answer solves what he asks, but not his ambiguity problem. –  Mooing Duck Mar 6 '12 at 0:10
add comment

Ok, I found a way to fix it by templating the operator overload:

 template<typename P> friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& cout, const P& obj)
 {
  obj.print(cout);

  return cout;
 }

I'm not sure how stable this is, though.

share|improve this answer
    
That's... not a good idea. Not at all. –  Mooing Duck Mar 6 '12 at 0:13
    
@MooingDuck Just out of curiosity, what terrible things would it do? And do you know an alternative? –  user173342 Mar 6 '12 at 0:17
    
I posted the correct answer to your problem. The problem from your code comes from classes that do not derive from Printable attempting to use your function, and probably failing. Namely, every template class. –  Mooing Duck Mar 6 '12 at 0:20
    
I suppose that would be unfortunate. –  user173342 Mar 6 '12 at 0:24
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.