Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to restrict the value of a field in a row of a table to a specific range. Is it possible to restrict my relationship_level field to [0.00 to 1.00]?

At the moment I am using DECIMAL(2,2), it wouldn't allow DECIMAL(1,2) as M must be >= D. I assume a data type of DECIMAL(2,2) will actually allow values from 00.00 up to 99.99?

CREATE TABLE relationships (
    from_user_id MEDIUMINT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    to_user_id MEDIUMINT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    relationship_level DECIMAL(2,2) UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (from_user_id, to_user_id), 
    FOREIGN KEY (from_user_id) REFERENCES users (user_id) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE NO ACTION,
    FOREIGN KEY (to_user_id) REFERENCES users (user_id) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE NO ACTION,
    INDEX relationship_from_to (to_user_id, from_user_id, relationship_level)
) ENGINE = INNODB;

Is there a better way to do this, can anyone foresee any limitations?

Many thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
If you really want to restrict the values from 0.00 to 1.00, you should use a DECIMAL(3,2) datatype and an FK referencing to a "stable" (reference) table, with just 101 rows. Much like the answer to your other question: Limit the value of a MySQL datatype to a specific range – ypercubeᵀᴹ Mar 5 '12 at 23:46
    
Perfect. I imagined it would involve something similar to this (with a FK referencing another table restricting the range) I just wondered if there existed a more 'efficient' method to the previous approach. Many thanks. – leokennedy Mar 5 '12 at 23:49
1  
There is one other possibility but I haven't used it so I'm not aware of any problems. Define an updatable View using the WITH CHECK OPTION. But then, you'll have to use only that View instead of the Table (at least for Inserts and Updates): CREATE VIEW Syntax – ypercubeᵀᴹ Mar 6 '12 at 0:02
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can simulate a check constraint in MySQL using triggers.

For example, if you want to force all values larger than 1.00 to be stored as 1.00, you could do so with 2 triggers like this:

DELIMITER $$

DROP TRIGGER IF EXISTS tr_b_ins_relationships $$

CREATE TRIGGER tr_b_ins_relationships BEFORE INSERT ON relationships FOR EACH ROW BEGIN
  IF new.relationship_level > 1
  THEN
    SET new.relationship_level = 1;
  END IF;
END $$

DELIMITER ;


DELIMITER $$

DROP TRIGGER IF EXISTS tr_b_upd_relationships $$

CREATE TRIGGER tr_b_upd_relationships BEFORE UPDATE ON relationships FOR EACH ROW BEGIN
  IF new.relationship_level > 1
  THEN
    SET new.relationship_level = 1;
  END IF;
END $$

DELIMITER ;
share|improve this answer
    
Triggers sounds excellent, I think I'll be using them to solve this problem and in a few other places now. Thanks! – leokennedy Mar 6 '12 at 0:45
    
The apple sounded excellent (and looked yummy) to Adam, too. Are database triggers evil? – ypercubeᵀᴹ Mar 6 '12 at 1:28
1  
I assert this is a reasonable use of triggers, especially given the fact that MySQL does not support check constraints. – Ike Walker Mar 6 '12 at 1:43

Actually, DECIMAL(2,2) will allow a decimal of up to 2 places, BOTH of which are allocated to decimal places. The maximum value for that field would be 0.99, and the minimum would be 0.00.

To restrict values to 00.00 to 99.99, use DECIMAL(4,2) UNSIGNED.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, thanks for clarifying the range I would actually get from using DECIMAL(2,2)=[0.00 to 0.99]. Is it actually possible to limit it in such a way to achieve a range of [0.00 to 1.00], I'm assuming it would involve alternatives to the DECIMAL datatype. – leokennedy Mar 5 '12 at 23:34
1  
No, you can't have from [0.00 to 1.00] restricted. With DECIMAL(3,2) UNSIGNED you could have from 0.00 to 9.99 – ypercubeᵀᴹ Mar 5 '12 at 23:37
    
You could restrict it using BEFORE INSERT/UPDATE TRIGGERS. You could either coerce the values or trigger an error by setting a NOT NULL column to NULL in the trigger. – nnichols Mar 5 '12 at 23:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.