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I am getting this error:

Msg 195, Level 15, State 10, Line 1
'fnParseName' is not a recognized built-in function name.

On this query:

SELECT  fnParseName(DOCTORFIRSTNAME+' ' +DOCTORLASTNAME) 
  FROM [PracticeandPhysician]

Here's the code for fnParseName

create FUNCTION [dbo].[fnParseName]
               (@FullName NVARCHAR(128))
RETURNS @FullNameParts TABLE  (FirstName  NVARCHAR(128),
                               Middle     NVARCHAR(128),
                               LastName   NVARCHAR(128))
AS
  BEGIN
    ... function body that populates @FullNameParts ...
    RETURN
  END

Why am I getting this error?

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it's a table valued function if that helps –  Yuck Mar 5 '12 at 23:28
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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's a table-valued function. So you probably meant:

SELECT p.DOCTORFISTNAME, p.DOCTORLASTNAME, t.FirstName, t.Middle, t.LastName
  FROM dbo.[PracticeandPhysician] AS p
  CROSS APPLY dbo.fnParseName(p.DOCTORFIRSTNAME + ' ' + p.DOCTORLASTNAME);

Note that you can't say:

SELECT dbo.TableValueFunction('foo');

Any more than you could say:

SELECT dbo.Table;
--or
SELECT dbo.View;

You can, however, say:

SELECT * FROM dbo.fnParseName('foo bar');
--or
SELECT FirstName, Middle, LastName FROM dbo.fnParseName('foo bar');

(Not that I have validated that your function does what you think, or does so efficiently.)

Please always use the dbo. prefix as others have suggested.

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thank you so much!!! how would i pass an entire table into fnparsename? –  Yuck Mar 6 '12 at 3:09
    
Didn't I show that in the very first sample, using CROSS APPLY? It should output columns from every input row in dbo.[PracticeandPhysician]. –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 6 '12 at 3:10
    
this is wonderful! what does cross apply do –  Yuck Mar 6 '12 at 3:59
    
"CROSS APPLY returns only rows from the outer table that produce a result set from the table-valued function." From the MSDN documentation: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms175156.aspx –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 6 '12 at 4:04
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The problem you have is similar to what I encountered too. Scalar function and Table inline functions are quite different in terms of implementation. See below for the diiferent

 Create function udfCountry
 (
@CountryName varchar(50)
 )
 returns varchar(2)
 as 
 BEGIN
 Declare @CountryID varchar(2),
    @Result varchar(2)

 Select @CountryID = Country from 
dbo.GeoIPCountryNames where CountryName = @CountryName

set @Result = isNull(@CountryID, 'NA')
if @Result = 'NA'
set @Result = 'SD'
return @Result
End

//Implementation

select dbo.[udfCountry]('Nigeria')

// sample result

NG

// Inline table function sample

 Create FUNCTION  ConditionEvaluation
 (
  @CountrySearch varchar(50)
 )
 returns @CountryTable table 
(
Country varchar(2),
CountryName varchar(50)
 )
 as 

 Begin

 Insert into @CountryTable(Country, CountryName)
 Select Country, CountryName from GeoIPCountryNames
 where Country like '%'+@CountrySearch+'%'
 return 
 end

//Implementation sample

 Declare @CountrySearch varchar(50)
 set @CountrySearch='a'
 select * from  ConditionEvaluation(@CountrySearch)

the parttern of implementation of scalar and inline table are quite different. I hope this helps

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You always have to prefix SQL function calls with the schema name dbo. or the schema name for that function (dbo is the default schema).

SELECT dbo.fnParseName(--etc
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Msg 4121, Level 16, State 1, Line 2 Cannot find either column "dbo" or the user-defined function or aggregate "dbo.fnParseName", or the name is ambiguous. –  Yuck Mar 5 '12 at 23:23
    
Then I'd say you were in the wrong database. –  Matt Gibson Mar 5 '12 at 23:27
    
@MattGibson nope definitely not, i can send u snapshot if u want –  Yuck Mar 5 '12 at 23:27
    
@MattGibson it's a table valued function if that helps –  Yuck Mar 5 '12 at 23:27
2  
@Peter it's a table-valued function. The prefix is important but the real problem is you can't reference a table-valued function like an expression (though you can with a scalar UDF). –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 5 '12 at 23:46
show 8 more comments

UDFs/Functions need to be prefixed with the schema name (most likely "dbo"). Change the call to

SELECT
    dbo.fnParseName(DOCTORFIRSTNAME + ' ' + DOCTORLASTNAME) 
FROM
    [PracticeandPhysician]
share|improve this answer
    
Msg 4121, Level 16, State 1, Line 2 Cannot find either column "dbo" or the user-defined function or aggregate "dbo.fnParseName", or the name is ambiguous. –  Yuck Mar 5 '12 at 23:23
    
The schema prefix is not the issue here (while it will still be required, there is a more fundamental syntax issue). –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 5 '12 at 23:54
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