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I am trying to make simple app, that lets user to move around with arrows. So far, i managed to let user move up, down, left and right overriding ProcessCmdKey() method.

protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData)
        {
            if (keyData == Keys.Up)
            {
                statek.Y--;
                return true;
            }
            if (keyData == Keys.Left)
            {
                statek.X--;
                return true;
            }
            if (keyData == Keys.Right)
            {
                statek.X++;
                return true;
            }
            if (keyData == Keys.Down)
            {
                statek.Y++;
                return true;
            }
            return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
        }

The problem is, i would love to let the user, go diagonally too. Like up and right at same time. I tried to search for some solutions, but unfortunately without any luck. I will try to modify it, to make left/right keys to turn/rotate, so the up key would mean "forward", not "go up". But first of all, i need to make 2 keys at once possible.

So the question is, how can i make possible, to use 2 keys at once, to move diagonally?

PS. Atm, i am moving an ellipse on picturebox, changing Point statek = new Point(250, 470); cords, so everytime timers ticks, it checks if X or Y changed, and draw it in new place. Often ticks - That's how i tried to achieve Real-time movement for now. Thats not going to be any complex application.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First create bit enumeration to hold arrow keys states:

[Flags]
enum ArrowsPressed
{
    None = 0x00,
    Left = 0x01,
    Right = 0x02,
    Up = 0x04,
    Down = 0x08,
    All = 0x0F
}

Then a member to keep track of state and a function to change it;

ArrowsPressed arrowsPressed;

void ChangeArrowsState(ArrowsPressed changed, bool isPressed)
{
    if (isPressed)
    {
        arrowsPressed |= changed;
    }
    else
    {
        arrowsPressed &= ArrowsPressed.All ^ changed;
    }
}

Override KeyDown and KeyUp (do not forget to set KeyPreview property of the form to true to let the form receive keys in case a child control wants to steal them;

protected override void OnKeyDown(KeyEventArgs e)
{
    base.OnKeyDown(e);
    switch (e.KeyCode)
    {
        case Keys.Down:
            ChangeArrowsState(ArrowsPressed.Down, true);
            break;
        case Keys.Up:
            ChangeArrowsState(ArrowsPressed.Up, true);
            break;
        case Keys.Left:
            ChangeArrowsState(ArrowsPressed.Left, true);
            break;
        case Keys.Right:
            ChangeArrowsState(ArrowsPressed.Right, true);
            break;
        default:
            return;
    }
    HandleArrows();
    e.Handled = true;
}
protected override void OnKeyUp(KeyEventArgs e)
{
    base.OnKeyUp(e);
    switch (e.KeyCode)
    {
        case Keys.Down:
            ChangeArrowsState(ArrowsPressed.Down, false);
            break;
        case Keys.Up:
            ChangeArrowsState(ArrowsPressed.Up, false);
            break;
        case Keys.Left:
            ChangeArrowsState(ArrowsPressed.Left, false);
            break;
        case Keys.Right:
            ChangeArrowsState(ArrowsPressed.Right, false);
            break;
        default:
            return;
    }
    e.Handled = true;
}

Finally, using a Point structure to hold your position test all tracked keys and move point in the direction they indicate;

Point position;
private void HandleArrows()
{
    if ((arrowsPressed & ArrowsPressed.Down) != ArrowsPressed.None)
    {
        position.Y++;
    }
    if ((arrowsPressed & ArrowsPressed.Up) != ArrowsPressed.None)
    {
        position.Y--;
    }
    if ((arrowsPressed & ArrowsPressed.Left) != ArrowsPressed.None)
    {
        position.X--;
    }
    if ((arrowsPressed & ArrowsPressed.Right) != ArrowsPressed.None)
    {
        position.X++;
    }
    //  Do whatever is needed using position
}
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This is a good answer. –  Russ C Mar 6 '12 at 1:13
    
Doesn't work, the key stops repeating. A timer is required. –  Hans Passant Mar 6 '12 at 1:29
    
@Hans Yes, you are absolutely right. Windows send WM_KEYDOWN messages for last key pressed. When this key is released movement stops. A timer will certainly help in this situation, but if one uses a timer it would pay out to use Pinvoke for GetKeyboardState. –  Nikola Markovinović Mar 6 '12 at 2:20
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You need to keep some type of list of all the keys that are currently in the Key_Down state.

This allows you to track what keys are pressed down and decide what combinations are valid.

Each event triggers once per key down/up event. So detecting two keys in one event is not possible, but you can track this information in a collection scoped outside of your events.

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Improved version using GetKeyboardState. This time around a timer will invoke a function which will check for pressed keys, construct ArrowsPressed enumeration and call a function to execute movement. If you want to use some other key put it in virtualKeyToArrowsPressed Dictionary.

const int VK_LEFT = 0x25;
const int VK_UP = 0x26;
const int VK_RIGHT = 0x27;
const int VK_DOWN = 0x28;

[DllImport("user32.dll")]
[return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
static extern bool GetKeyboardState(byte[] lpKeyState);

byte[] keys = new byte[256];

[Flags]
enum ArrowsPressed
{
    None = 0x00,
    Left = 0x01,
    Right = 0x02,
    Up = 0x04,
    Down = 0x08,
    All = 0x0F
}
Dictionary<int, ArrowsPressed> virtualKeyToArrowsPressed = new Dictionary<int, ArrowsPressed>
{
    { VK_LEFT, ArrowsPressed.Left },
    { VK_RIGHT, ArrowsPressed.Right },
    { VK_UP, ArrowsPressed.Up },
    { VK_DOWN, ArrowsPressed.Down },
};

protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e)
{
    base.OnLoad(e);

    timer1.Tick += timer1_Tick;
    timer1.Interval = 100;
    timer1.Start();
}

void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (GetKeyboardState(keys))
    {
        ArrowsPressed arrowsPressed = ArrowsPressed.None;
        foreach (KeyValuePair<int, ArrowsPressed> kvp in virtualKeyToArrowsPressed)
        {
            if ((keys[kvp.Key] & 0x80) != 0)
            {
                arrowsPressed |= kvp.Value;
            }
        }
        if (arrowsPressed != ArrowsPressed.None)
        {
            HandleArrows(arrowsPressed);
        }
    }
}

Point position;
private void HandleArrows(ArrowsPressed arrowsPressed)
{
    if ((arrowsPressed & ArrowsPressed.Down) != ArrowsPressed.None)
    {
        position.Y++;
    }
    if ((arrowsPressed & ArrowsPressed.Up) != ArrowsPressed.None)
    {
        position.Y--;
    }
    if ((arrowsPressed & ArrowsPressed.Left) != ArrowsPressed.None)
    {
        position.X--;
    }
    if ((arrowsPressed & ArrowsPressed.Right) != ArrowsPressed.None)
    {
        position.X++;
    }
    //  Do whatever is needed using position
}
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