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I learned that TCP requires two ports to work: one to send data to the server, and one to receive data from the server. Is there a way to specify--specifically for ssh--both of those ports? I am under the impression that the local tunnel method is for the outgoing local port and the incoming server port, but not the incoming local port.

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With openssh you can create encrypted tunnels to direct traffic from one point to another. You can use -L and/or -R flags to accomplish the job.

Ex1: You can bind a local port on your client PC that will be forwarded to another machine flowing through the SSH server;

(ssh user@sshserver -L<local_port>:<remote_ip>:<remote_port>)
ssh user@192.168.1.1 -L8080:192.168.1.20:8090

Ex2: You can bind a port on a remote machine that is attached to a port of your local machine flowing through the SSH server;

(ssh user@sshserver -R<local_port>:<remote_ip>:<remote_port>)
ssh user@192.168.1.1 -R8080:192.168.1.20:8080

Ex3: You can bind a local port on your client PC that will be forwarded to a remote port of the SSH server itself;

(ssh user@sshserver -L<local_port>:<sshserver>:<remote_port>)
ssh user@192.168.1.1 -L8080:127.0.0.1:8090

In the first example, executing:

telnet 127.0.0.1 8080

on the client machine will connect you to 192.168.1.20 on port 8090 (it's a SSH server network!)

In the second example, the port 8080 will be binded (created) on the machine 192.168.1.20 (it's a SSH server network!) and it's associated to a local port 8080 of the SSH client. So, on 192.168.1.20 you can:

telnet 127.0.0.1 8080

and you'll be directed to the 8080 of the SSH client machine.

The third example is like the first, but the remote machine is the SSH server itself, so if you:

telnet 127.0.0.1 8080

from you client machine, you'll be connected to the port 8090 of the SSH server.

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I just read that you need to forward UDP traffic. This can be done with openvpn, not with openssh. – dAm2K Mar 6 '12 at 0:06

What you learned is not quite correct. A TCP connection is between a pair of IP/port combinations (client IP/port, server IP/port), but there is only one port used by each end. For instance, a connection might be between a client on 1.2.3.4:65432 and a server on 5.6.7.8:22.

The client port is completely immaterial to most applications, including SSH. You can force SSH to use a "privileged" (under 1024) port using the UsePrivilegedPort directive, but that's only available to root.

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Ok, thanks for clarifying. I assume that nonetheless there is no way of doing what I proposed? I wanted to forward udp streams to ssh using a python script. – Alex Eftimiades Mar 5 '12 at 23:53
    
SSH doesn't forward UDP, period. Only handles TCP. – duskwuff Mar 5 '12 at 23:55
    
I know, I was hoping to be able to use a python program to take the data ssh sends to one port via tcp, forward it to another with UDP, and take it to listening port via tcp. – Alex Eftimiades Mar 6 '12 at 0:01

I learned that TCP requires two ports to work: one to send data to the server, and one to receive data from the server

No it doesn't. It needs one local port and one remote port. It is a bidirectional protocol, and it is also full-duplex. Your question therefore doesn't need an answer.

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