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I define my own set class using collections.Set:

class MySet(collections.Set):
    def __init__(self, data=frozenset()):
        self._set = frozenset(data)
    __len__ = lambda self: self._set.__len__()
    __iter__ = lambda self: self._set.__iter__()
    __contains__ = lambda self: self._set.__contains__()

I wish to inherit the frozenset.union method. With that method you can do the following:

>>> frozenset.union(frozenset('ab'), frozenset('bc'))
frozenset(['a', 'c', 'b'])
>>> frozenset.union(*[frozenset('ab'), frozenset('bc')])
frozenset(['a', 'c', 'b'])

I want to be able to do the following:

>>> MySet.union(MySet('ab'), MySet('bc'))
MySet(['a', 'c', 'b'])
>>> MySet.union(*[MySet('ab'), MySet('bc')])
MySet(['a', 'c', 'b'])

How do I best go about this?

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"I define my own set class using collections.Set", Why? –  Johnsyweb Mar 5 '12 at 23:45
1  
I have reduced my own particular set class down to the above for this question. The particular class adds functionality to this class different from the one in the built-in (frozen)set, but those aspects are irrelevant to this question; i.e., I've omitted the unnecessary aspects to create a minimal example. –  equaeghe Mar 5 '12 at 23:52
    
EDIT: clarified exactly what I want to do, i.e., illustrated frozenset.union and hypothetical MySet.union –  equaeghe Mar 6 '12 at 11:25

2 Answers 2

You have __or__ which is called when you write s1 | s2 and is supposed to mean the union of two sets.

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I am specifically interested in inheriting/emulating the frozenset.union method which allows taking the union of arbitrary numbers of frozensets –  equaeghe Mar 6 '12 at 0:03
    
I have to define __or__ = lambda self, other: MySet(self._set | other._set), otherwise TypeError: specify a Set instead of a generator, because I have if isinstance(data, Set): before guarding the equivalent of self._set = frozenset(data) in my particular case –  equaeghe Mar 6 '12 at 11:32

I wouldn't say this is the "best way", but could work for your personal use?

import collections

class MySet(collections.Set):
    def __init__(self, data=frozenset()):
        self._set = frozenset(data)
    __len__ = lambda self: self._set.__len__()
    __iter__ = lambda self: self._set.__iter__()
    __contains__ = lambda self: self._set.__contains__()
    __union__ = lambda self,j: self._set.union(j)

a = MySet(range(5))
b = MySet(range(3,10))

print a.__union__(b)
print b.__union__(a)

"""
>>>
frozenset([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])
frozenset([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])
>>>
"""
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If I say union = lambda self, other: MySet(self._set.union(other)), then I get: MySet().union(MySet(set('ab'))) gives MySet(frozenset(['a', 'b'])) and MySet.union(MySet(set('ab'))) gives TypeError: <lambda>() takes exactly 2 arguments (1 given) –  equaeghe Mar 6 '12 at 11:35

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